Page 11234..1020..»

NanoViricides (NNVC) Abstract Accepted for Poster Presentation at ASV – StreetInsider.com

§ June 20th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on NanoViricides (NNVC) Abstract Accepted for Poster Presentation at ASV – StreetInsider.com

Get daily under-the-radar research with StreetInsider.com’s Stealth Growth Insider Get your 2-Wk Free Trial here.

NanoViricides, Inc., (NYSE: NNVC) a pioneer in developing anti-viral nanomedicine drugs, is pleased to announce that its late-breaking abstract submission has been accepted for a poster presentation at the 36th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Virology (ASV). The ASV Meeting will be hosted and held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, from June 24th to 28th, 2017 (https://extensionconferencecenters.uwex.edu/asv2017/).

Dr. Brian Friedrich, Senior Virologist of the Company, will present the Company’s work on the evaluation of nanoviricides drug candidates for effectiveness against the shingles virus (Varicella Zoster Virus, VZV, aka Human HerpesVirus-3 or HHV-3). He will present data on both safety and effectiveness of the nanoviricides drug candidates against VZV infection in multiple different cell lines.

NanoViricides has recently announced that two of the HerpeCide program drug candidates demonstrated complete (almost 100%) inhibition of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV, aka human herpesvirus 3 or HHV-3) at highest drug doses, whereas acyclovir at the same drug dose exhibited only about 70% inhibition of the virus. The nanoviricide drug candidates were almost five times as effective as acyclovir in these assays. No cytotoxicity was observed at any of the doses tested for the herpecide drug candidates. Details of these studies will be presented in the poster at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the ASV.

The NanoViricides poster, entitled “Novel Nanoviricides Highly Effective against Varicella Zoster Virus in Cell Culture” will be presented in Poster Session II, open for viewing from 4pm to 6pm on Monday, June 26th, 2017.

About NanoViricides: NanoViricides, Inc. (www.nanoviricides.com) is a development stage company that is creating special purpose nanomaterials for antiviral therapy. The Company’s novel nanoviricide class of drug candidates are designed to specifically attack enveloped virus particles and to dismantle them. The Company is developing drugs against a number of viral diseases including H1N1 swine flu, H5N1 bird flu, seasonal Influenza, HIV, oral and genital Herpes, viral diseases of the eye including EKC and herpes keratitis, Hepatitis C, Rabies, Dengue fever, and Ebola virus, among others.

Read more:
NanoViricides (NNVC) Abstract Accepted for Poster Presentation at ASV – StreetInsider.com

Read the Rest...

Nanomedicine Global Market Outlook,Research,Trends and Forecast to 2023 – Digital Journal

§ June 20th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Nanomedicine Global Market Outlook,Research,Trends and Forecast to 2023 – Digital Journal

WiseGuyReports.Com Publish a New Market Research Report On – Nanomedicine Global Market Outlook,Research,Trends and Forecast to 2023.

This press release was orginally distributed by SBWire

New York, NY — (SBWIRE) — 06/19/2017 — Overview: Nanomedicine is an offshoot of nanotechnology, and refers to highly-specific medical intervention at the molecular scale for curing diseases or repairing damaged tissues. Nanomedicine uses nano-sized tools for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of disease, and to gain increased understanding of the complex underlying pathophysiology of the disease. It involves three nanotechnology areas of diagnosis, imaging agents, and drug delivery with nanoparticles in the 11,000 nm range, biochips, and polymer therapeutics.

The majority of nanomedicines used now allow oral drug delivery and its demand is increasing significantly. Although these nanovectors are designed to translocate across the gastrointestinal tract, lung, and bloodbrain barrier, the amount of drug transferred to the organ is lower than 1%; therefore improvements are challenging. Nanomedicines are designed to maximize the benefit/risk ratio, and their toxicity must be evaluated not only by sufficiently long term in vitro and in vivo studies, but also pass multiple clinical studies.

The major drivers of the nanomedicine market include its application in various therapeutic areas, increasing R&D studies about nanorobots in this segment, and significant investments in clinical trials by the government as well as private sector. The Oncology segment is the major therapeutic area for nanomedicine application, which comprised more than 35% of the total market share in 2016. A major focus in this segment is expected to drive the growth of the nanomedicine market in the future.

Get a Sample Report @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/1273888-global-nanomedicine-market-drivers-opportunities-trends-and-forecasts-2017-2023

For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com

Market Analysis: The “Global Nanomedicine Market” is estimated to witness a CAGR of 17.1% during the forecast period 20172023. The nanomedicine market is analyzed based on two segments therapeutic applications and regions.

Regional Analysis: The regions covered in the report are the Americas, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Rest of the World (ROW). The Americas is set to be the leading region for the nanomedicine market growth followed by Europe. The Asia Pacific and ROW are set to be the emerging regions. Japan is set to be the most attractive destination and in Africa, the popularity and the usage of various nano-drugs are expected to increase in the coming years. The major countries covered in this report are the US, Germany, Japan, and Others.

Therapeutic Application Analysis: Nanomedicines are used as fluorescent markers for diagnostic and screening purposes. Moreover, nanomedicines are introducing new therapeutic opportunities for a large number of agents that cannot be used effectively as conventional oral formulations due to poor bioavailability. The therapeutic areas for nanomedicine application are Oncology, Cardiovascular, Neurology, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-infectives, and various other areas. Globally, the industry players are focusing significantly on R&D to gain approval for various clinical trials for future nano-drugs to be commercially available in the market. The FDA should be relatively prepared for some of the earliest and most basic applications of nanomedicine in areas such as gene therapy and tissue engineering. The more advanced applications of nanomedicine will pose unique challenges in terms of classification and maintenance of scientific expertise.

Key Players: Merck & Co. Inc., Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Gilead Sciences Inc., Novartis AG, Amgen Inc., Pfizer Inc., Eli Lilly and Company, Sanofi, Nanobiotix SA, UCB SA and other predominate & niche players.

Competitive Analysis: At present, the nanomedicine market is at a nascent stage but, a lot of new players are entering the market as it holds huge business opportunities. Especially, big players along with the collaboration with other SMBs for clinical trials of nanoparticles and compounds are coming with new commercial targeted drugs in the market and they are expecting a double-digit growth in the upcoming years. Significant investments in R&D in this market are expected to increase and collaborations, merger & acquisition activities are expected to continue.

Benefits: The report provides complete details about the usage and adoption rate of nanomedicines in various therapeutic verticals and regions. With that, key stakeholders can know about the major trends, drivers, investments, vertical player’s initiatives, government initiatives towards the nanomedicine adoption in the upcoming years along with the details of commercial drugs available in the market. Moreover, the report provides details about the major challenges that are going to impact on the market growth. Additionally, the report gives the complete details about the key business opportunities to key stakeholders to expand their business and capture the revenue in the specific verticals to analyze before investing or expanding the business in this market.

Ask Query @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/enquiry/1273888-global-nanomedicine-market-drivers-opportunities-trends-and-forecasts-2017-2023

Table Of Contents Major Key Points

1 Industry Outlook 10 1.1 Industry Overview 10 1.2 Industry Trends 11 1.3 PEST Analysis 12

2 Report Outline 12 2.1 Report Scope 12 2.2 Report Summary 13 2.3 Research Methodology 14 2.4 Report Assumptions 14

3 Market Snapshot 16 3.1 Total Addressable Market (TAM) 16 3.2 Segmented Addressable Market (SAM) 16 3.3 Related Markets 17 3.3.1 mHealth Market 17 3.3.2 Healthcare Analytics Market 18

4 Market Outlook 18 4.1 Overview 18 4.2 Regulatory Bodies and Standards 19 4.3 Government Spending and Initiatives 19 4.4 Porter 5 (Five) Forces 21

5 Market Characteristics 22 5.1 Evolution 22 5.2 Ecosystem 25 5.2.1 Regulatory Process 25 5.2.2 Clinical Trials 25 5.2.3 Pricing and Reimbursement 26 5.3 Market Segmentation 28 5.4 Market Dynamics 28 5.4.1 Drivers 29 5.4.1.1 Emergence of nanorobotics 29 5.4.1.2 Applications and advantages of nanomedicine in various healthcare segments 29 5.4.1.3 Reasonable investments in R&D 30 5.4.1.4 Increased support from governments 30 5.4.2 Restraints 31 5.4.2.1 Long approval process and stringent regulations 31 5.4.2.2 Problems regarding nanoscale manufacturing 31 5.4.2.3 Risks related to nanomedicines 31 5.4.2.4 Undefined regulatory standards 31 5.4.3 Opportunities 32 5.4.3.1 Aging population with chronic care needs 32 5.4.3.2 Population and income growth in emerging countries 32 5.4.4 DRO Impact Analysis 33

6 Trends, Roadmap and Projects 34 6.1 Market Trends and Impact 34 6.2 Technology Roadmap 35

7 Types: Market Size and Analysis 36 7.1 Overview 36 7.2 Global Nanomedicine Market in Oncology Segment 37 7.3 Global Nanomedicine Market in Cardiovascular Segment 38 7.4 Global Nanomedicine Market in Neurology Segment 39 7.5 Global Nanomedicine Market in Anti-inflammatory Segment 39 7.6 Global Nanomedicine Market in Anti-infective Segment 40 7.7 Global Nanomedicine Market in Other Therapeutic Areas 41

8 Trending Nanomedicines 42 8.1 Overview 42 8.2 Abraxane 43 8.3 Alimta 43 8.4 Eligard 44 8.5 Copaxone 44 8.6 Rapamune 44 8.7 Neulasta 45 8.8 Cimzia 45 8.9 AmBisome 46 8.10 Mircera 46 8.11 Pegasys 46 8.12 Emend 47 8.13 Renagel 47 8.14 Ritalin 47

For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com

Buy 1-User PDF @ https://www.wiseguyreports.com/checkout?currency=one_user-USD&report_id=1273888

About Wise Guy Reports Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports features an exhaustive list of market research reports from hundreds of publishers worldwide. We boast a database spanning virtually every market category and an even more comprehensive collection of market research reports under these categories and sub-categories.

For more information on this press release visit: http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/nanomedicine-global-market-outlookresearchtrends-and-forecast-to-2023-816726.htm

See original here:
Nanomedicine Global Market Outlook,Research,Trends and Forecast to 2023 – Digital Journal

Read the Rest...

2017 Forecast – Asia Pacific Nanomedicine Market, Industry Size and Share to 2023 – Digital Journal

§ June 20th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on 2017 Forecast – Asia Pacific Nanomedicine Market, Industry Size and Share to 2023 – Digital Journal

Global Market Research Report on Nanomedicine Market 2017 is a professional and in-depth complete study on the current state of the Nanomedicine worldwide.

This press release was orginally distributed by SBWire

Deerfield Beach, FL — (SBWIRE) — 06/19/2017 — Latest industry research report on Nanomedicine Market. Nanomedicine is the applied branch of nanotechnology. Application of nanomedicines ranges from nonmaterial to nanoelectronic and in the near future, it could possibly expand to molecular nanotechnology. Biological, pharmaceutical and medical research organizations (CROs) are largely benefitted by the exceptional properties of nonmaterial and exploit it for various applications including diagnosis and treatment of diseases. The Asia pacific nanomedicine market is majorly driven by advancement in nanomedicine technologies, government initiatives, growing investment in research funding, better understanding of technical know-how and a high prevalence of chronic diseases.

Get Free Sample Report Of Nanomedicine Market @ http://www.marketresearchstore.com/report/asia-pacific-nanomedicine-market-opportunities-and-forecasts-71378#RequestSample

However, the cost of materials used in nanotechnology study along with the insufficient regulatory framework can pose a major restrain for the growth of the Asia pacific nanomedicines market. Presence of high growth opportunities in nanomedicines would provide significant benefits to emerging economies such as India and China due to the impending healthcare needs in this location.

The Asia Pacific nanomedicine market is segmented into two categories such as application and geography.

BY APPLICATION

Cardiovascular Oncology Anti-Inflammatory Anti-Infective Neurology Others

BY GEOGRAPHY

China Japan India Australia Others

Do Inquiry To Buy Report Of Nanomedicine Market @ http://www.marketresearchstore.com/report/asia-pacific-nanomedicine-market-opportunities-and-forecasts-71378#InquiryForBuying

For more information on this press release visit: http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/2017-forecast-asia-pacific-nanomedicine-market-industry-size-and-share-to-2023-813182.htm

Read more here:
2017 Forecast – Asia Pacific Nanomedicine Market, Industry Size and Share to 2023 – Digital Journal

Read the Rest...

Editor’s choice: recent research highlights from the International Journal of Nanomedicine – Dove Medical Press

§ June 20th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Editor’s choice: recent research highlights from the International Journal of Nanomedicine – Dove Medical Press

Farooq A Shiekh,1 Abdul-Rahman M Abu-Izzah,2 Vivian J Lee,2 Syed Mudassar1

1Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar, India; 2Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Avalon University School of Medicine, Curacao, the Netherlands Is nanomedicine really less harmful? Evaluation of: Thakkar A, Chenreddy S, Thio A, Khamas W, Wang J, Prabhu S. Preclinical systemic toxicity evaluation of chitosan-solid lipid nanoparticle-encapsulated aspirin and curcumin in combination with free sulforaphane in BALB/c mice. Int J Nanomedicine. 2016;11:32653276. Nanomedicine1 has increasingly received a tremendous attention over the past two decades as a potential multidimensional field, developing nano-applications that are transforming a host of medical products and services,2,3 including drug delivery4 and health-monitoring devices, and the possibility of gaining new insights about undruggable targets and treatment through atomic-scale precision is increasing rapidly.5 Although it is uncertain as to which of the new delivery platforms will become the most effective and useful, it is certain that many new approaches will be investigated in the years to come.4,6

This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Read the original here:
Editor’s choice: recent research highlights from the International Journal of Nanomedicine – Dove Medical Press

Read the Rest...

Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery Conferences | Pharma …

§ June 13th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery Conferences | Pharma …

About Us

International Conference and Exhibition on Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery May 14-16, 2018 Tokyo, Japan

ConferenceSeries Ltdis a renowned organization that organizes highly notable Pharmaceutical Conferencesthroughout the globe. Currently we are bringing forthInternational Conference on Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery(NanoDelivery 2018) scheduled to be held duringMay 14-16, 2018 at Tokyo, Japan. The conferenceinvites all the participants across the globe to attend and share their insights and convey recent developments in the field of Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery.

ConferenceSeries Ltdorganizes aconference seriesof 1000+ Global Events inclusive of 1000+ Conferences, 500+ Upcoming and Previous Symposiums and Workshops in USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientificsocietiesand publishes 700+Open access Journalswhich contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

2018 Highlights:

Nanomedicine and drugdelivery will account for 40% of a $136 billion nanotechnology-enabled drug delivery market by 2021. We forecast the total market size in 2021 to be US$136 billion, with a 60/40 split between nano medicine and drug delivery respectively, although developing new targeted delivery mechanisms may allow more value to be created for companies and entrepreneurs.

However, the Asia-Pacific region is expected to grow at a faster CAGR owing to presence of high unmet healthcare needs, research collaborations and increase in nanomedicine research funding in emerging economies such as Japan, China, India and other economies in the region. Japan is expected to surpass the United States in terms of nanotechnology funding in the near future, which indicates the growth offered by this region.This conference seeks to showcase work in the area of Nanomedicine, Drug Delivery Systems, and nanotechnology, Nanobiothechnology, particularly related to drug delivery.

For More PS: http://nanomedicine.pharmaceuticalconferences.com/

(Click here for any queries)

Nanomedicine and drugdelivery can address one of the greatest challenges in the post-genomic era of the 21st century making the essential connections between Academics and industry professionals.

To meet these challenges, the field of Nanomedicine and drugdelivery has undergone exponential growth during the last 5 years. Technologies such as Personalized Nanomedicine, Nanomedicine in Theranostics, Design of Nanodrugs, Synthesis of Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery, Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering, Nanomedicines and Biomedicalapplications, Nanomaterials for drug delivery, Regulatory Aspects Towards Approval of Nanomedicine, NanoPharmaceutical Industry and Market processing and drug delivery promise to transform the world of nanomedicines and drug delivery much in the same way that integrated a transformed the world of pharmaceutical sciences.

Nanodelivery 2018 has everything you need:

Open panel discussions: Providing an open forum with experts from academia and business to discuss on current challenges in nanomedicine and drugdelivery, where all attendees can interact with the panel followed by a Q&A session.

Speaker and poster presentations: Providing a platform to all academicians and industry professionals to share their research thoughts and findings through a speech or a poster presentation.

Editorial board meeting: Discussing on growth and development of open access Nanomedicine and drugdelivery International Journals and recruiting board members and reviewers who can support the journal.

Round table meetings: Providing a platform where industry professionals meet academic experts.

Over 50+ organizations and international pavilions will be exhibiting at the Nanodelivery 2017 conference and Exhibition. Exhibitors will include equipment manufacturers and suppliers, systems providers, finance and investment firms, R&D companies, project developers, trade associations, and government agencies.

In addition to the products and services you will see at the Nanodelivery Exhibition, you will have access to valuable content, including Keynote Presentations, Product Demonstrations and Educational Sessions from todays industry leaders.

The Nanodelivery 2017 has everything you need, all under one roof, saving you both time and money. It is the event you cannot afford to miss!

Who’s Coming to Nanodelivery 2018?

More:
Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery Conferences | Pharma …

Read the Rest...

A method to improve in vitro tests – Phys.Org

§ June 9th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on A method to improve in vitro tests – Phys.Org

June 6, 2017

Before new nanoparticles or other nanomedicines can be injected into the human body, a whole series of tests must be conducted in the laboratory, then in living cells, and in the end on humans. But often the results obtained in vitro do not resemble what actually happens in the animal or human body. Thus, the researchers reconsidered the basis of the in vitro experimental design.

In an article published in the journal Small, EPFL researchers explain how such issues can be avoided by replacing conventional static in vitro tests with dynamic tests that approximate complex living conditions – comparable to those that occur in the body’s blood and lymphatic systems.

The researchers were able to “replicate” the varying real-body conditions in a lab, and test the behaviour of nanoparticles in different blood and lymph flows. They also reproduced the “cleaning” effect of nanoparticles, which go through in lymph nodes, by “washing” lymph off them and reinjecting them into the blood serum.

“Current incubation conditions are static,” says Marijana Mionic Ebersold, a former post-doc at EPFL, leading author of the study in the framework of a Nano-Tera project and currently working as a scientific collaborator at the University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV). “Nanoparticles or drugs to be tested are carefully added to the typically static fluids and cells, and then there is a waiting period in static conditions before the interaction and the effects can be studied for instance under the microscope”, she adds. “In the human body, fluids and cells never stay nicely static. It’s an extremely dynamic and complex environment. The conventional static in vitro methods do not therefore allow for the translation of results from in vitro to in vivo testing.”

Reproducing the conditions in blood and lymphatic systems

For their study, the researchers used the protein corona as the parameter which reflects this in vitro/in vivo discrepancy. The protein corona forms around nanoparticles when they come into contact with a biological environment. Its presence influences the behaviour of nanoparticles in the body by altering their chemical properties, destination, and their interactions with other cells.

The protein corona is affected by both the flow and type of fluid, i.e. blood or lymph, as the study shows. “Surprisingly, the influence of lymph on the protein corona and the fate of nanoparticles has so far been completely neglected – although subcutaneously injected nanomedicines immediately contact the patient’s lymph”, says Mioni? Ebersold.

The study revealed that a change in both the flow and fluids is an extremely important factor when it comes to the formation of the protein corona. For example, the flow conditions would change and the protein corona would be different in a patient with different blood pressure troubles as compared to a healthy person. Nanoparticles may thus behave quite differently and in various patients and have different effects on them.

Dynamic tests would therefore be extremely useful for observing the formation of the protein corona in various in vitro environments in order to predict how the nanoparticles will ultimately behave in vivo. “When in vivo results are different to in vitro results, scientists tend to say that they tested their nanomedicine in the wrong animal model or that the chemicals weren’t exactly the same etc.,” says Mioni? Ebersold. “We think that the problem begins much earlier, with the in vitro tests that are performed at the starting point of translational nanomedicine: their static design is what often accounts for the discrepancies with the later in vivo tests.”

Explore further: Silver nanoparticles’ protein ‘corona’ affects their toxicity

More information: Debora Bonvin et al. Protein Corona: Impact of Lymph Versus Blood in a Complex In Vitro Environment, Small (2017). DOI: 10.1002/smll.201700409

A senior fellow at the Faculty of Chemistry, MSU, Vladimir Bochenkov, together with his colleagues from Denmark, have established the mechanism of interaction of silver nanoparticles with the cells of the immune system. The …

Hemostasis is a highly regulated process with key function for human life. The process is based on a rather complex interplay between endothelial cells, plasmatic coagulation and platelets. Deregulated hemostasis can result …

A Houston Methodist-led research team showed that the systemic administration of nanoparticles triggers an inflammatory response because of blood components accumulating on their surface. This finding may help researchers …

(Phys.org)One of the biggest challenges to realizing the potential of targeted therapies is keeping nanomaterials from accumulating in the liver or spleen. The liver and spleen are part of the mononuclear phagocyte system. …

Due to their nanoscale dimensions and sensitivity to light, quantum dots are being used for a number of bioimaging applications including in vivo imaging of tumor cells, detection of biomolecules, and measurement of pH changes.

Researchers at the National University of Singapore (NUS) have developed a technique to observe, in real time, how individual blood components interact and modify advanced nanoparticle therapeutics. The method, developed …

To understand the nature of something extremely complex, you often have to study its smallest parts. In trying to decipher the universe, for example, we search for gravitational waves or faint waves of light from the Big …

Researchers have studied how light can be used to observe the quantum nature of an electronic material. They captured light in graphene and slowed it down to the speed of the material’s electrons. Then electrons and light …

New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Nanoscale, has probed the structure and material properties of protein machines in bacteria, which have the capacity to convert carbon dioxide into sugar …

When oil mixes with or enters into water, conventional methods of cleaning the water and removing the oil can be challenging, expensive and environmentally risky. But researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The …

The endothelial cells that line blood vessels are packed tightly to keep blood inside and flowing, but scientists at Rice University and their colleagues have discovered it may be possible to selectively open gaps in those …

Recent research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln may help future engineers of digital components get two (or more) for the space of one.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Read the original:
A method to improve in vitro tests – Phys.Org

Read the Rest...

NanoViricides (NNVC) Says Topical Drug Candidates for Treatment of Shingles Demonstrated Excellent Inhibition of … – StreetInsider.com

§ June 7th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on NanoViricides (NNVC) Says Topical Drug Candidates for Treatment of Shingles Demonstrated Excellent Inhibition of … – StreetInsider.com

News and research before you hear about it on CNBC and others. Claim your 2-week free trial to StreetInsider Premium here.

NanoViricides, Inc., (NYSE: NNVC) (the “Company”), a pioneer in developing anti-viral nanomedicine drugs, reports that its topical drug candidates in development for the treatment of shingles have demonstrated excellent inhibition of the causative virus with practically no cytotoxicity in cell culture assays using multiple cell lines.

Two of the nanoviricide drug candidates in the HerpeCide program demonstrated almost complete inhibition of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) at the highest drug doses, whereas acyclovir at the same drug dose exhibited partial inhibition of the virus. These comparative studies indicated that the antiviral effect of the herpecide drug candidates was almost five times superior to that of acyclovir. These studies were conducted using ARPE-19 cell line, which is a sensitive retinal cell line. Additional studies with another cell line, namely BS-C-1 produced comparable results. No cytotoxicity was observed at any of the doses tested for the herpecide drug candidates.

“We are excited with the excellent effectiveness and safety of these shingles antiviral drug candidates,” said Dr. Eugene Seymour, MD, MPH, CEO of the Company, adding, “We anticipate validation of our approach in skin culture studies as well. The human skin studies are already in progress in Professor Moffat’s Lab at the SUNY Syracuse Upstate Medical Center. Taken together, these results will put us on a quick path towards an IND filing.”

“We had strong confidence that the herpecide antivirals that we developed against HSV-1 would be effective against VZV as well. These studies validate our approach,” said Anil R. Diwan, PhD, President and Chairman of the Company, adding, “Importantly, the drug candidates that were successful against VZV are simpler to manufacture than our drug candidates that were previously found to be successful against HSV-1 in animal studies. We believe that this will reduce our workload towards an IND filing and help accelerate our progress to the clinic.”

Previously, the Company has demonstrated that treatment with certain herpecide drug candidates led to complete survival of small animals lethally infected with the aggressive and neurotropic HSV-1 strain H129c, wherein all of the untreated animals died. Those animal studies also reproducibly demonstrated dramatic improvements in clinical symptoms associated with herpes simplex virus infection, as illustrated by a complete absence of zosteriform spreading. Those animal studies were performed by TransPharm Preclinical Solutions (“TransPharm”), a pre-clinical services company in Jackson, MI, and by the laboratory of Dr. Ken S. Rosenthal at Northeast Ohio Medical University where Dr. Rosenthal then continued as a Professor Emeritus. Dr. Rosenthal is a leading researcher in herpes virus anti-viral agents and vaccines. He is now Professor of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, at the Roseman University of Health Sciences, Summerlin Campus, Las Vegas, NV.

The Company thereafter expanded its HerpeCide program into development of topical treatments for (a) herpes labials (HSV-1), (b) genital herpes (HSV-2), (c) shingles (VZV), and (d) herpes keratitis. Of these, the shingles treatment program is currently the most advanced and is rapidly moving towards clinical candidate selection.

Continued here:
NanoViricides (NNVC) Says Topical Drug Candidates for Treatment of Shingles Demonstrated Excellent Inhibition of … – StreetInsider.com

Read the Rest...

Rallying Point – Harvard Medical School (registration)

§ June 2nd, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Rallying Point – Harvard Medical School (registration)

Harvard Medical School researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have identified a surprising new role for the immune cells called macrophages: improving the effectiveness ofnanoparticle-deliveredcancer therapies.

In theirScience Translational Medicinereport, the investigators describe finding how appropriately timed radiation therapy can improve the delivery of cancernanomedicinesas much as 600 percent by attracting macrophages to tumor blood vessels, which results in a transient burst of leakage from capillaries into the tumor.

Get more HMS news here.

The field ofnanomedicinehas worked to improve selective drug delivery to tumors for over a decade, typically by engineering ever more advancednanomaterialsand often with mixed clinical success, said first authorMiles Miller, HMS instructor in radiology at Mass General. Rather than focusing on thenanoparticlesthemselves, we used in vivo microscopy to discover how to rewire the structure of the tumor itself to more efficiently accumulate a variety ofnanomedicinesalready in clinical use.

Encapsulating cancer drugs innanoparticlescan improve how a drug is absorbed, distributed, metabolized and excreted by extending a drugs presence in the circulatory system and avoiding the toxic solvents used in infusion chemotherapy.

But in clinical practice, delivering nanoencapsulated drugs into patients tumors has been challenging, largely because of known factors in the microenvironment of the tumor. High pressures within tumors and low permeability of tumor blood vessels limit the passage of drugs into tumor cells.

A 2015 study by Miller and his colleagues showed that tumor-associated macrophages can improve delivery of nanoparticle-based therapies to tumor cells, and radiation therapy is known to increase the permeability of tumor vessels. But exactly how these effects are produced and how they could be combined to enhancenanomedicinedelivery was not known. Answering those questions was the goal of the current study.

Finding that this combination of radiation andnanomedicineleads to synergistic tumor eradication in mice provides motivation for clinical trials that combine tumor rewiring using radiation therapy withnanomedicine” – Miles Miller

Experiments in mouse models of cancer revealed that radiation therapy produced important changes in the tumor microenvironment, including greater blood vessel size and permeability and an increase in the number of macrophages relative to tumor cells. These changes did not appear until three to four days after administration of radiation therapy and disappeared by day 11.

Analysis of patient biopsy samples taken before and several days after radiation therapy for breast or cervical cancer revealed significant macrophage expansion in post-radiation samples, with the greatest increases in patients receiving the highest radiation dosage.

Additional mouse studies showed that, beginning three days after radiation therapy, the uptake ofnanoparticles, but not of solvent-delivered drugs, approximately doubled. High-resolution in vivo microscopy revealed that increases in vascular permeability occurred erratically with periods of low permeability interrupted by a bursting of vascular contents, includingnanoparticles, into the tumors.

The rate of bursting increased three days after radiation and was higher on larger blood vessels with adjacent macrophages. Removal of macrophages prevented the radiation-induced changes and the increased uptake ofnanoparticles.

Combining radiation therapy with cyclophosphamidea DNA-damaging drug that enhances nanoparticle delivery to tumor cells through similar tumor-priming mechanismsled to even greater nanoparticle uptake.

Testing the therapeutic effect of combining radiation therapy with a nanoparticle-encased chemotherapy drugs in a mouse model confirmed the efficacy of the strategy and the key role of macrophages.

While combining radiation with a solvent-based drug had no benefit compared with radiation alone, delivery of a nanoencapsulated version of the same drug three days after radiation therapy eliminated most tumors, an effect that was significantly reduced if macrophages were depleted.

Finding that this combination of radiation andnanomedicineleads to synergistic tumor eradication in mice provides motivation for clinical trials that combine tumor rewiring using radiation therapy withnanomedicine, Miller said.

Most of the treatments andnanomedicinesemployed in this study are FDA approved for cancer treatment, so this combination treatment strategy could be tested in clinical trials relatively quickly, he added. And given the role of macrophages in this approach, we are particularly interested in combining tumor irradiation andnanomedicinewith immuno-oncology therapies.

This study was supported by National Institutes of Health grants UO1CA206997, K99CA207744, R01EB010011 and P50GM107618.

Adapted from a Mass Generalnewsrelease.

Continue reading here:
Rallying Point – Harvard Medical School (registration)

Read the Rest...

Radiation Therapy, Macrophages Improve Efficacy Of Nanoparticle-Delivered Cancer Therapy – Photonics Online

§ June 2nd, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Radiation Therapy, Macrophages Improve Efficacy Of Nanoparticle-Delivered Cancer Therapy – Photonics Online

A Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team has identified a surprising new role for the immune cells called macrophages improving the effectiveness of nanoparticle-delivered cancer therapies. In theirScience Translational Medicinereport, the investigators describe finding how appropriately timed radiation therapy can improve the delivery of cancer nanomedicines as much as 600 percent by attracting macrophages to tumor blood vessels, which results in a transient burst of leakage from capillaries into the tumor.

The field of nanomedicine has worked to improve selective drug delivery to tumors for over a decade, typically by engineering ever more advanced nanomaterials and often with mixed clinical success, says lead author Miles Miller, PhD, of the MGHCenter for Systems Biology. Rather than focusing on the nanoparticles themselves, we used in vivo microscopy to discover how to rewire the structure of the tumor itself to more efficiently accumulate a variety of nanomedicines already in clinical use.

Encapsulating cancer drugs in nanoparticles can improve pharmacokinetics how a drug is absorbed, distributed, metabolized and excreted by extending a drugs presence in the circulation and avoiding the toxic solvents used in infusion chemotherapy. But in clinical practice, delivering nanoencapsulated drugs into patients tumors has been challenging, largely because of known factors in the microenvironment of the tumor. High pressures within tumors and low permeability of tumor blood vessels limit the passage of any drugs from the circulation into tumor cells.

A 2015 study by Miller and his colleagues showed that tumor-associated macrophages can improve delivery of nanoparticle-based therapies to tumor cells, and radiation therapy is known to increase the permeability of tumor vessels. But exactly how these effects are produced and how they could be combined to enhance nanomedicine delivery was not known. Answering those questions was the goal of the current study.

Experiments in mouse models of cancer revealed that radiation therapy produced important changes in the tumor microenvironment including greater blood vessel size and permeability and an increase in the number of macrophages relative to tumor cells. These changes did not appear until 3 to 4 days after administration of radiation therapy and disappeared by day 11. Analysis of patient biopsy samples taken before and several days after radiation therapy for breast or cervical cancer revealed significant macrophage expansion in post-radiation samples, with the greatest increases in patients receiving the highest radiation dosage.

Additional mouse studies showed that, beginning three days after radiation therapy, the uptake of nanoparticles but not of solvent-delivered drugs approximately doubled. High-resolution in vivo microscopy revealed that increases in vascular permeability occurred erratically, with periods of low permeability interrupted by a bursting of vascular contents, including nanoparticles, into the tumors. The rate of bursting increased three days after radiation and was higher on larger blood vessels with adjacent macrophages. Removal of macrophages prevented the radiation-induced changes and the increased uptake of nanoparticles. Combining radiation therapy with cyclophosphamide a DNA-damaging drug that enhances nanoparticle delivery to tumor cells through similar tumor-priming mechanisms led to even greater nanoparticle uptake.

Testing the therapeutic effect of combining radiation therapy with a nanoparticle-encased chemotherapy drugs in a mouse model confirmed the efficacy of the strategy and the key role of macrophages. While combining radiation with a solvent-based drug had no benefit compared with radiation alone, delivery of a nanoencapsulated version of the same drug three days after radiation therapy eliminated most tumors, an effect that was significantly reduced if macrophages were depleted.

Finding that this combination of radiation and nanomedicine leads to synergistic tumor eradication in mice provides motivation for clinical trials that combine tumor rewiring using radiation therapy with nanomedicine, says Miller, who is an instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Most of the treatments and nanomedicines employed in this study are FDA approved for cancer treatment, so this combination treatment strategy could be tested in clinical trials relatively quickly. And given the role of macrophages in this approach, we are particularly interested in combining tumor irradiation and nanomedicine with immuno-oncology therapies.

Ralph Weissleder, MD, PhD, director of the MGH Center for Systems Biology is senior author of the Science Translational Medicine paper. Additional co-authors are Ravi Chandra, MD, Michael Cuccarese, PhD, Christina Pfirschke, PhD, Camilla Engblom, PhD, Shawn Stapleton, PhD, Utsarga Adhikary, Rainer H. Kohler, PhD, James F. Mohan, PhD, and Mikael J. Pittet, PhD, all of the Center for Systems Biology. Support for the study includes National Institutes of Health grants UO1CA206997, K99CA207744, R01EB010011, and P50GM107618.

Massachusetts General Hospital, founded in 1811, is the original and largest teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. TheMGH Research Instituteconducts the largest hospital-based research program in the nation, with an annual research budget of more than $800Mand major research centers in HIV/AIDS, cardiovascular research, cancer, computational and integrative biology, cutaneous biology, genomic medicine, medical imaging, neurodegenerative disorders, regenerative medicine, reproductive biology, systems biology, photomedicine and transplantation biology. The MGH topped the 2015 Nature Index list of health care organizations publishing in leading scientific journals and earned the prestigious 2015 Foster G. McGaw Prize for Excellence in Community Service. In August 2016 the MGH was once again named to the Honor Roll in the U.S. News & World Report list of “Americas Best Hospitals.”

See the rest here:
Radiation Therapy, Macrophages Improve Efficacy Of Nanoparticle-Delivered Cancer Therapy – Photonics Online

Read the Rest...

Radiation therapy, macrophages improve efficacy of nanoparticle-delivered cancer therapy – Medical Xpress

§ June 1st, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Radiation therapy, macrophages improve efficacy of nanoparticle-delivered cancer therapy – Medical Xpress

May 31, 2017 In this illustration based on in vivo microscopy, a tumor-associated macrophage (green) induces a burst of leakage from a tumor blood vessel (red), which releases nanoparticles into the tumor tissue (yellow). The large arrow shows nanoparticles being taken up by the macrophage, while the small dashed arrow depicts how the macrophage elicits further nanoparticle delivery via vascular bursting. Credit: Miles Miller, PhD, and Ralph Weissleder, MD, PhD; Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital

A Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team has identified a surprising new role for the immune cells called macrophagesimproving the effectiveness of nanoparticle-delivered cancer therapies. In their Science Translational Medicine report, the investigators describe finding how appropriately timed radiation therapy can improve the delivery of cancer nanomedicines as much as 600 percent by attracting macrophages to tumor blood vessels, which results in a transient “burst” of leakage from capillaries into the tumor.

“The field of nanomedicine has worked to improve selective drug delivery to tumors for over a decade, typically by engineering ever more advanced nanomaterials and often with mixed clinical success,” says lead author Miles Miller, PhD, of the MGH Center for Systems Biology. “Rather than focusing on the nanoparticles themselves, we used in vivo microscopy to discover how to rewire the structure of the tumor itself to more efficiently accumulate a variety of nanomedicines already in clinical use.”

Encapsulating cancer drugs in nanoparticles can improve pharmacokineticshow a drug is absorbed, distributed, metabolized and excretedby extending a drug’s presence in the circulation and avoiding the toxic solvents used in infusion chemotherapy. But in clinical practice, delivering nanoencapsulated drugs into patients’ tumors has been challenging, largely because of known factors in the microenvironment of the tumor. High pressures within tumors and low permeability of tumor blood vessels limit the passage of any drugs from the circulation into tumor cells.

The video will load shortly

A 2015 study by Miller and his colleagues showed that tumor-associated macrophages can improve delivery of nanoparticle-based therapies to tumor cells, and radiation therapy is known to increase the permeability of tumor vessels. But exactly how these effects are produced and how they could be combined to enhance nanomedicine delivery was not known. Answering those questions was the goal of the current study.

Experiments in mouse models of cancer revealed that radiation therapy produced important changes in the tumor microenvironmentincluding greater blood vessel size and permeability and an increase in the number of macrophages relative to tumor cells. These changes did not appear until 3 to 4 days after administration of radiation therapy and disappeared by day 11. Analysis of patient biopsy samples taken before and several days after radiation therapy for breast or cervical cancer revealed significant macrophage expansion in post-radiation samples, with the greatest increases in patients receiving the highest radiation dosage.

Additional mouse studies showed that, beginning three days after radiation therapy, the uptake of nanoparticles but not of solvent-delivered drugs approximately doubled. High-resolution in vivo microscopy revealed that increases in vascular permeability occurred erratically, with periods of low permeability interrupted by a bursting of vascular contents, including nanoparticles, into the tumors. The rate of bursting increased three days after radiation and was higher on larger blood vessels with adjacent macrophages. Removal of macrophages prevented the radiation-induced changes and the increased uptake of nanoparticles. Combining radiation therapy with cyclophosphamide – a DNA-damaging drug that enhances nanoparticle delivery to tumor cells through similar tumor-priming mechanisms – led to even greater nanoparticle uptake.

Testing the therapeutic effect of combining radiation therapy with a nanoparticle-encased chemotherapy drugs in a mouse model confirmed the efficacy of the strategy and the key role of macrophages. While combining radiation with a solvent-based drug had no benefit compared with radiation alone, delivery of a nanoencapsulated version of the same drug three days after radiation therapy eliminated most tumors, an effect that was significantly reduced if macrophages were depleted.

“Finding that this combination of radiation and nanomedicine leads to synergistic tumor eradication in mice provides motivation for clinical trials that combine tumor rewiring using radiation therapy with nanomedicine,” says Miller, who is an instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. “Most of the treatments and nanomedicines employed in this study are FDA approved for cancer treatment, so this combination treatment strategy could be tested in clinical trials relatively quickly. And given the role of macrophages in this approach, we are particularly interested in combining tumor irradiation and nanomedicine with immuno-oncology therapies.”

Explore further: Researchers deliver first ‘nanotherapeutics’ to tumor

More information: M.A. Miller el al., “Radiation therapy primes tumors for nanotherapeutic delivery via macrophage-mediated vascular bursts,” Science Translational Medicine (2017). stm.sciencemag.org/lookup/doi/10.1126/scitranslmed.aal0225

For the first time, WSU researchers have demonstrated a way to deliver a drug to a tumor by attaching it to a blood cell. The innovation could let doctors target tumors with anticancer drugs that might otherwise damage healthy …

Pancreatic cancer has long been one of the hardest to treat. Now, in a new study, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have illuminated one of this cancer’s major resistance mechanisms: …

Some cancer therapies aim at stopping tumor growth by affecting the blood vessels that nurture the tumor mass, while others act on the immune system attempting to eliminate the tumor. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine …

Many types of cancer become drug resistant, making them difficult to treat. Researchers with University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have identified a strategy to selectively sensitize …

The effects of a promising new approach to chemotherapy that involves frequent administration of dosage levels much lower than traditionally used appears to rely on the “normalization” of blood vessels within and around a …

Imaging probes that specifically target tumors can provide more sensitive and relevant information about the tumor compared to conventional, non-specific probes. Additionally, targeted probes can improve tumor detection, …

A Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team has identified a surprising new role for the immune cells called macrophagesimproving the effectiveness of nanoparticle-delivered cancer therapies. In their Science …

Duke University researchers have developed a handheld device for cervical cancer screening that promises to do away with uncomfortable speculums and high-cost colposcopes.

New research led by Queen’s University Belfast has discovered how a genomic approach to understanding bowel (colorectal) cancer could improve the prognosis and quality of life for patients.

Batman and Robin. Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. Fiction is full of dynamic duos that work together to accomplish amazing feats. When one partner is out of commission, the other steps in to make sure the job gets done. But …

Research in the field of kidney cancer, also called renal cancer, is vital, because many patients with this disease still cannot be cured today. Researchers from the University of Zurich have now identified some of the gene …

A University of Otago, Christchurch, discovery of missing DNA in women who develop breast cancer at a young age could hold the key to helping them beat the disease.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

See the original post:
Radiation therapy, macrophages improve efficacy of nanoparticle-delivered cancer therapy – Medical Xpress

Read the Rest...

Manufacturing the future of nanomedicine – Cordis News

§ May 31st, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Manufacturing the future of nanomedicine – Cordis News

EU-funded RNA-based therapy targets the direct cause of some neurodegenerative diseases, not just their symptoms.

Precision NanoSystem’s NanoAssemblr™ will use RNA-based therapeutics to stem disease producing proteins for conditions such as Parkinsons, Alzheimers and Huntingtons. These illnesses affect over seven million people across Europe, with a socio-economic burden previously estimated at around 130 billion euros per year.

Overcoming the barrier to RNA therapy

RNA is a molecule influential in the coding, decoding, regulation and expression of genes, which includes the production of proteins responsible for disease. There has been much excitement at the prospect of co-opting this function (through messenger RNA – mRNA) to enable medicine to instruct the body to stop damage before it occurs. This is a relatively new field of medicine, only going back a couple of decades and considered safer and more cost-effective than alternative genetic manipulation options.

However, for these RNA modalities to reach their full potential, they first need to overcome the bodys defences, developed through billions of years of evolution. Protections such as lipid bilayers (forming a thin membrane) have served to keep the RNAs on the outside of cells from being able to easily get inside cells. Overcoming this armoury has remained, quite literally, a barrier to the widespread development of RNA therapeutics.

B-SMART has developed just such an effective delivery mechanism through the use of nanocarriers. These are transport modules small enough to cross the brain-cerebrospinal fluid barrier while also protecting the RNA enzymes against degradation.

As the B-SMART project coordinator, Professor Raymond Schiffelers, summarises in a recent Technology Networks article announcing the selection of the manufacturing platform, ‘RNA medicines are interesting because you can use what is essentially the same polynucleotide molecule to treat multiple diseases, just by changing the nucleotide sequence. Our goal is therefore to design modular nanoparticles capable of delivering a payload of therapeutic RNAs to the brain, allowing them to prevent the biosynthesis of harmful proteins at source.’

Out of the lab and into clinics

To increase effectiveness, the delivery mechanism required specific targeting using ligands (small molecules, ions or proteins), based on heavy chain-only nanobodies, which are smaller and more stable than conventional antibodies. The modular delivery system is being tested both in vitro and in vivo.

Taking advantage of knowledge gleaned form the multidisciplinary field of microfluidics, and key to getting B-SMARTs approach out of the lab and into a wide range of European therapeutic settings, is the development of a scalable and reproducible manufacturing process. Towards this end the benchtop NanoAssemblr platform will be in use in the eight laboratories involved in the project, across the Netherlands, Belgium, Norway, the UK, Spain and Italy.

Professor Schiffelers further explains the selection of the Precision NanoSystems NanoAssemblr platform by saying, ‘This technology also allows you to accurately predict the particle size based on the mixing speed, PEG [polyether compounds] concentration and mixing ratios, which is a significant step forward. Equally importantly, it can be easily scaled to manufacture batch volumes sufficient for clinical trials’. The pre-clinical efficacy will be tested after local injection, nasal administration and systemic administration.

For more information, please visit project website

Read the original post:
Manufacturing the future of nanomedicine – Cordis News

Read the Rest...

Nanomedicine Market is anticipated to reach USD 350.8 billion by 2025 – PR Newswire (press release)

§ May 30th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Nanomedicine Market is anticipated to reach USD 350.8 billion by 2025 – PR Newswire (press release)

Solutions such as nanoformulations with triggered release for tailor-made pharmacokinetics, nanoparticles for local control of tumor in combination with radiotherapy, and functionalized nanoparticles for targeted in-vivo activation of stem cell production are anticipated to drive R&D, consequently resulting in revenue generation in the coming years.

Biopharmaceutical and medical devices companies are actively engaged in development of novel products as demonstrated by the increasingly growing partnerships between leading enterprises and nanomedicine startups.

Therapeutics accounted for the largest share of market revenue in 2016 owing to presence of nanoemulsions, nanoformulations, or nanodevices

These devices possess the ability to cross biological barriers. Moreover, presence of drugs such as Doxil, Abraxane, and Emend is attributive for higher revenue generation

Presence of substantial number of products manufactured through the use of microbial sources can be attributed for the largest share

In-vitro diagnostics is expected to witness lucrative progress as a result of R&D carried out in this segment

Asia Pacific is estimated to witness the fastest growth over the forecast period

Key players operating in this industry include Pfizer Inc., Ablynx NV, Nanotherapeutics Inc., Nanoviricides Inc., Abraxis Inc., Arrowhead Research Inc., Celgene Corporation, Bio-Gate AG, and Merck

Active expansion strategies are undertaken by a number of the major market entities in order to strengthen their position

North America dominated the industry in 2016, accounting for a 42% of total revenue

The global nanomedicine market is anticipated to reach USD 350.8 billion by 2025, according to a new report by Grand View Research, Inc.

Development of novel nanotechnology-based drugs and therapies is driven by the need to develop therapies that have fewer side effects and that are more cost-effective than traditional therapies, in particular for cancer.

Application of nanotechnology-based contrast reagents for diagnosis and monitoring of the effects of drugs on an unprecedented short timescale is also attributive drive growth in the coming years. Additionally, demand for biodegradable implants with longer lifetimes that enable tissue restoration is anticipated to influence demand.

As per the WHO factsheet, cancer is found to be one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with approximately 14 million new cases in 2012 and 8.2 million cancer-related deaths. Thus, demand for nanomedicine in order to curb such high incidence rate is expected to boost market progress during the forecast period.

Solutions such as nanoformulations with triggered release for tailor-made pharmacokinetics, nanoparticles for local control of tumor in combination with radiotherapy, and functionalized nanoparticles for targeted in-vivo activation of stem cell production are anticipated to drive R&D, consequently resulting in revenue generation in the coming years.

Biopharmaceutical and medical devices companies are actively engaged in development of novel products as demonstrated by the increasingly growing partnerships between leading enterprises and nanomedicine startups. For instance, in November 2015, Ablynx and Novo Nordisk signed a global collaboration and a licensing agreement for development and discovery of innovative drugs with multi-specific nanobodies. This strategic partnership is anticipated to rise the net annual sales of the products uplifting the market growth.

However, in contrary with the applications of nanotechnology, the entire process of lab to market approval is a tedious and expensive one with stringent regulatory evaluation involved thereby leading investors to remain hesitant for investments.

Further key findings from the report suggest: Therapeutics accounted for the largest share of market revenue in 2016 owing to presence of nanoemulsions, nanoformulations, or nanodevices

These devices possess the ability to cross biological barriers. Moreover, presence of drugs such as Doxil, Abraxane, and Emend is attributive for higher revenue generation

Presence of substantial number of products manufactured through the use of microbial sources can be attributed for the largest share

In-vitro diagnostics is expected to witness lucrative progress as a result of R&D carried out in this segment

Introduction of nano-enabled biomarkers, vectors and contrast agents with high-specificity and sensitivity are attributive for projected progress

Clinical cardiology is expected to witness the fastest growth through to 2025 owing to development in nano-functionalization and modification of surfaces for increased biocompatibility of implants in treatment of late thrombosis

Moreover, an abundance of research publications and patent filings from European region with a share of about 25% in nanomedicine-related publications is supportive for revenue generation from European economies

Asia Pacific is estimated to witness the fastest growth over the forecast period

Factors responsible include government and regulatory authorities that have implemented a framework to encourage R&D collaborations and framework extension.

Key players operating in this industry include Pfizer Inc., Ablynx NV, Nanotherapeutics Inc., Nanoviricides Inc., Abraxis Inc., Arrowhead Research Inc., Celgene Corporation, Bio-Gate AG, and Merck

Active expansion strategies are undertaken by a number of the major market entities in order to strengthen their position

North America dominated the industry in 2016, accounting for a 42% of total revenue

Read the full report: http://www.reportlinker.com/p04899216/Nanomedicine-Market-Analysis-By-Products-Therapeutics-Regenerative-Medicine-Diagnostics-By-Application-Clinical-Oncology-Infectious-diseases-By-Nanomolecule-Gold-Silver-Iron-Oxide-Alumina-Segment-Forecasts.html

About Reportlinker ReportLinker is an award-winning market research solution. Reportlinker finds and organizes the latest industry data so you get all the market research you need – instantly, in one place.

http://www.reportlinker.com __________________________ Contact Clare: clare@reportlinker.com US: (339)-368-6001 Intl: +1 339-368-6001

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nanomedicine-market-is-anticipated-to-reach-usd-3508-billion-by-2025-300465805.html

SOURCE Reportlinker

http://www.reportlinker.com

See more here:
Nanomedicine Market is anticipated to reach USD 350.8 billion by 2025 – PR Newswire (press release)

Read the Rest...

Nanomedicine Market Analysis By Products, (Therapeutics, Regenerative …

§ May 28th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Nanomedicine Market Analysis By Products, (Therapeutics, Regenerative …

1 Research Methodology 1.1 Information procurement 1.2 Data Analysis 2 Executive Summary 3 Nanomedicine Market Variables, Trends & Scope 3.1 Market Segmentation & Scope 3.1.1 Market driver analysis 3.1.1.1 Rising level of government participation in R&D funding 3.1.1.2 Introduction of technological advancements in diagnostic procedures 3.1.1.3 Rising usage of nanomedicine in drug delivery technology 3.1.2 Market restraint analysis 3.1.2.1 Side effects associated with intake of nanoparticles and lower adoption rate by patients 3.1.2.2 Hesitant uptake by medical and pharmaceutical industry 3.2 Penetration & Growth Prospect Mapping For Products, 2016 & 2025 3.3 Nanomedicine – SWOT Analysis, By Factor (political & legal, economic and technological) 3.4 Industry Analysis – Porters 4 Nanomedicine Market: Product Estimates & Trend Analysis 4.1 Nanomedicine market: product movement analysis 4.2 Therapeutics 4.2.1 Global therapeutics market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 4.3 Regenerative medicine 4.3.1 Global regenerative medicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 4.4 In-vitro diagnostics 4.4.1 Global in-vitro diagnostics market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 4.5 In-vivo diagnostics 4.5.1 Global in-vivo diagnostics market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 4.6 Vaccines 4.6.1 Global vaccines market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 5 Nanomedicine Market: Application Estimates & Trend Analysis 5.1 Nanomedicine market: Application movement analysis 5.2 Clinical oncology 5.2.1 Global clinical oncology market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 5.3 Infectious diseases 5.3.1 Global infectious diseases market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 5.4 Clinical cardiology 5.4.1 Global clinical cardiology market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 5.5 Orthopedics 5.5.1 Global orthopedics market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 5.6 Others 5.6.1 Global other applications market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6 Nanomedicine Market: Nanomolecule Type Estimates & Trend Analysis 6.1 Nanomedicine Market: Nanomolecule Type Movement Analysis 6.2 Nanomolecules 6.2.1 Global nanomolecules market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.2 Nanoparticles & quantum dots 6.2.2.1 Global nanoparticles & quantum dots market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.2.2 Metal & metal compounds 6.2.2.2.1 Global metal & metal compounds nanoparticles market, by type nanoparticles market estimate & forecast, 2014 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.2.2.2 Gold nanoparticles market estimate & forecast, 2014 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.2.2.3 Silver nanoparticles market estimate & forecast, 2014 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.2.2.4 Alumina nanoparticles market estimate & forecast, 2014 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.2.2.5 Iron oxide nanoparticles market estimate & forecast, 2014 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.2.2.6 Gadolinium nanoparticles market estimate & forecast, 2014 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.2.2.7 Other metal & metal oxide nanoparticles market estimate & forecast, 2014 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.2.3 Global metal & metal compound nanoparticles market, by application 6.2.2.3.1 In-vivo Imaging 6.2.2.3.2 Targeted drug delivery 6.2.2.3.3 Proton therapy 6.2.2.3.4 In-vitro assays 6.2.2.3.5 Cell & phantom imaging 6.2.2.4 Liposomes 6.2.2.4.1 Global liposomes market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.2.5 Polymer & polymer drug conjugates 6.2.2.5.1 Global polymer & polymer drug conjugates market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.2.6 Hydrogel nanoparticles 6.2.2.6.1 Global hydrogel nanoparticles market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.2.7 Dendrimers 6.2.2.7.1 Global dendrimers market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.2.8 Inorganic nanoparticles 6.2.2.8.1 Global inorganic nanoparticles market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.3 Nanoshells 6.2.3.1 Global nanoshells market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.4 Nanotubes 6.2.4.1 Global nanotubes market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 6.2.5 Nanodevices 6.2.5.1 Global nanodevices market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 7 Nanomedicine Market: Regional Estimates & Trend Analysis, by Product, Application, & Nanomolecule Type 7.1 Nanomedicine market share by region, 2016 & 2025 7.2 North America 7.2.1 North America nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 7.2.2 U.S. 7.2.2.1 U.S. nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 7.2.3 Canada 7.2.3.1 Canada nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 7.3 Europe 7.3.1 Europe nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 7.3.2 Germany 7.3.2.1 Germany nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 7.3.3 UK 7.3.3.1 UK nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 7.4 Asia Pacific. 7.4.1 Asia Pacific nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 7.4.2 Japan 7.4.2.1 Japan nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 7.4.3 China 7.4.3.1 China nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 7.5 Latin America 7.5.1 Latin America nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 7.5.2 Brazil 7.5.2.1 Brazil nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 7.6 Middle East & Africa 7.6.1 Middle East & Africa nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 7.6.2 South Africa 7.6.2.1 South Africa nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) 8 Competitive Landscape 8.1 Strategy framework 8.2 Market participation categorization 8.3 Company Profiles 8.3.1 Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 8.3.1.1 Company overview 8.3.1.2 CALANDO PHARMACEUTICALS, Inc. 8.3.1.3 Financial performance 8.3.1.4 Product benchmarking 8.3.2 Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) 8.3.2.1 Company overview 8.3.2.2 Financial performance 8.3.2.3 Product benchmarking 8.3.3 Nanospectra Biosciences, Inc. 8.3.3.1 Company overview 8.3.3.2 Financial performance 8.3.3.3 Product benchmarking 8.3.4 ABLYNX 8.3.4.1 Company overview 8.3.4.2 Financial performance 8.3.4.3 Product benchmarking 8.3.4.4 Strategic initiatives 8.3.5 AMAG Pharmaceuticals 8.3.5.1 Company overview 8.3.5.2 Financial performance 8.3.5.3 Product benchmarking 8.3.5.4 Strategic initiatives 8.3.6 Bio-Gate AG 8.3.6.1 Company overview 8.3.6.2 Financial performance 8.3.6.3 Product benchmarking 8.3.6.4 Strategic initiatives 8.3.7 Celgene Corporation 8.3.7.1 Company overview 8.3.7.2 Abraxis BioScience, Inc. 8.3.7.3 Financial Performance 8.3.7.4 Product benchmarking 8.3.7.5 Strategic initiatives 8.3.8 Johnson & Johnson Services, Inc. 8.3.8.1 Company overview 8.3.8.2 Financial performance 8.3.8.3 Product benchmarking 8.3.8.4 Strategic initiatives 8.3.9 Pfizer, Inc. 8.3.9.1 Company overview 8.3.9.2 Financial performance 8.3.9.3 Product benchmarking 8.3.9.4 Strategic initiatives 8.3.10 Abbott 8.3.10.1 Company overview 8.3.10.2 Financial performance 8.3.10.3 Product benchmarking 8.3.10.4 Strategic initiatives 8.3.11 Leadiant Biosciences, Inc. 8.3.11.1 Company overview 8.3.11.2 Financial performance 8.3.11.3 Product benchmarking 8.3.11.4 Strategic initiatives 8.3.12 Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. 8.3.12.1 Company overview 8.3.12.2 Financial performance 8.3.12.3 Product benchmarking 8.3.13 CYTIMMUNE SCIENCES, INC. 8.3.13.1 Company overview 8.3.13.2 Financial performance 8.3.13.3 Product benchmarking 8.3.13.4 Strategic initiatives 8.3.14 Merck & Co Ltd 8.3.14.1 Company Overview 8.3.14.2 Financial performance 8.3.14.3 Product benchmarking 8.3.14.4 Strategic initiatives 8.3.15 Gilead 8.3.15.1 Company Overview 8.3.15.2 Financial performance 8.3.15.3 Product benchmarking 8.3.16 Epeius Biotechnologies Corporation 8.3.16.1 Company overview 8.3.16.2 Financial performance 8.3.16.3 Product benchmarking

List of Tables

Table 1 Nanofibers in Regenerative Medicine Table 2 North America nanomedicine market estimates, by product, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion)) Table 3 North America nanomedicine market forecasts, by product, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 4 North America nanomedicine market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 5 North America nanomedicine market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 6 North America nanomedicine market estimates, by nanomolecule type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 7 North America nanomedicine market forecasts, by nanomolecule type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 8 North America nanoparticle market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 9 North America nanoparticle market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 10 North America metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 11 North America metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 12 North America metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 13 North America metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 14 Patent applicant for nanotechnology based therapeutics Table 15 U.S. nanomedicine market estimates, by product, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion)) Table 16 U.S. nanomedicine market forecasts, by product, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 17 U.S. nanomedicine market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 18 U.S. nanomedicine market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 19 U.S. nanomedicine market estimates, by nanomolecule type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 20 U.S. nanomedicine market forecasts, by nanomolecule type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 21 U.S. nanoparticle market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 22 U.S. nanoparticle market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 23 U.S. metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 24 U.S. metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 25 U.S. metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 26 U.S. metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 27 Nanotechnology organizations which are involved in publishing nanoscience based articles Table 28 Canada nanomedicine market estimates, by product, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion)) Table 29 Canada nanomedicine market forecasts, by product, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 30 Canada nanomedicine market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 31 Canada nanomedicine market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 32 Canada nanomedicine market estimates, by nanomolecule type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 33 Canada nanomedicine market forecasts, by nanomolecule type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 34 Canada nanoparticle market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 35 Canada nanoparticle market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 36 Canada metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 37 Canada metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 38 Canada metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 39 Canada metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 40 Europe nanomedicine market estimates, by product, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion)) Table 41 Europe nanomedicine market forecasts, by product, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 42 Europe nanomedicine market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 43 Europe nanomedicine market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 44 Europe nanomedicine market estimates, by nanomolecule type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 45 Europe nanomedicine market forecasts, by nanomolecule type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 46 Europe nanoparticle market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 47 Europe nanoparticle market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 48 Europe metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 49 Europe metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 50 Europe metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 51 Europe metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 52 Germany nanomedicine market estimates, by product, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion)) Table 53 Germany nanomedicine market forecasts, by product, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 54 Germany nanomedicine market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 55 Germany nanomedicine market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 56 Germany nanomedicine market estimates, by nanomolecule type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 57 Germany nanomedicine market forecasts, by nanomolecule type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 58 Germany nanoparticle market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 59 Germany nanoparticle market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 60 Germany metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 61 Germany metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 62 Germany metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 63 Germany metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 64 UK nanomedicine market estimates, by product, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion)) Table 65 UK nanomedicine market forecasts, by product, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 66 UK nanomedicine market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 67 UK nanomedicine market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 68 UK nanomedicine market estimates, by nanomolecule type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 69 UK nanomedicine market forecasts, by nanomolecule type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 70 UK nanoparticle market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 71 UK nanoparticle market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 72 UK metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 73 UK metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 74 UK metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 75 UK metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 76 Asia Pacific nanomedicine market estimates, by product, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion)) Table 77 Asia Pacific nanomedicine market forecasts, by product, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 78 Asia Pacific nanomedicine market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 79 Asia Pacific nanomedicine market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 80 Asia Pacific nanomedicine market estimates, by nanomolecule type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 81 Asia Pacific nanomedicine market forecasts, by nanomolecule type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 82 Asia Pacific nanoparticle market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 83 Asia Pacific nanoparticle market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 84 Asia Pacific metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 85 Asia Pacific metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 86 Asia Pacific metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 87 Asia Pacific metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 88 Japan nanomedicine market estimates, by product, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion)) Table 89 Japan nanomedicine market forecasts, by product, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 90 Japan nanomedicine market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 91 Japan nanomedicine market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 92 Japan nanomedicine market estimates, by nanomolecule type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 93 Japan nanomedicine market forecasts, by nanomolecule type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 94 Japan nanoparticle market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 95 Japan nanoparticle market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 96 Japan metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 97 Japan metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 98 Japan metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 99 Japan metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 100 China nanomedicine market estimates, by product, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion)) Table 101 China nanomedicine market forecasts, by product, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 102 China nanomedicine market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 103 China nanomedicine market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 104 China nanomedicine market estimates, by nanomolecule type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 105 China nanomedicine market forecasts, by nanomolecule type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 106 China nanoparticle market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 107 China nanoparticle market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 108 China metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 109 China metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 110 China metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 111 China metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 112 Latin America nanomedicine market estimates, by product, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion)) Table 113 Latin America nanomedicine market forecasts, by product, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 114 Latin America nanomedicine market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 115 Latin America nanomedicine market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 116 Latin America nanomedicine market estimates, by nanomolecule type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 117 Latin America nanomedicine market forecasts, by nanomolecule type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 118 Latin America nanoparticle market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 119 Latin America nanoparticle market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 120 Latin America metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 121 Latin America metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 122 Latin America metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 123 Latin America metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 124 Brazil nanomedicine market estimates, by product, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion)) Table 125 Brazil nanomedicine market forecasts, by product, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 126 Brazil nanomedicine market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 127 Brazil nanomedicine market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 128 Brazil nanomedicine market estimates, by nanomolecule type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 129 Brazil nanomedicine market forecasts, by nanomolecule type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 130 Brazil nanoparticle market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 131 Brazil nanoparticle market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 132 Brazil metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 133 Brazil metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 134 Brazil metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 135 Brazil metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 136 MEA nanomedicine market estimates, by product, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion)) Table 137 MEA nanomedicine market forecasts, by product, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 138 MEA nanomedicine market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 139 MEA nanomedicine market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 140 MEA nanomedicine market estimates, by nanomolecule type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 141 MEA nanomedicine market forecasts, by nanomolecule type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 142 MEA nanoparticle market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 143 MEA nanoparticle market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 144 MEA metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 145 MEA metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 146 MEA metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 147 MEA metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 148 South Africa nanomedicine market estimates, by product, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion)) Table 149 South Africa nanomedicine market forecasts, by product, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 150 South Africa nanomedicine market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 151 South Africa nanomedicine market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 152 South Africa nanomedicine market estimates, by nanomolecule type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 153 South Africa nanomedicine market forecasts, by nanomolecule type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 154 South Africa nanoparticle market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 155 South Africa nanoparticle market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 156 South Africa metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by type, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 157 South Africa metal and metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by type, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion) Table 158 South Africa metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market estimates, by application, 2013 – 2016 (USD Billion) Table 159 South Africa metal & metal oxides nanoparticles market forecasts, by application, 2017 – 2025 (USD Billion)

List of Figures

Figure 1 Market research process Figure 2 Information procurement Figure 3 Primary research pattern Figure 4 Market research approaches Figure 5 Value chain based sizing & forecasting Figure 6 QFD modelling for market share assessment Figure 7 Market summary Figure 8 Market trends & outlook Figure 9 Market segmentation & scope Figure 10 Market driver relevance analysis (Current & future impact) Figure 11 Market restraint relevance analysis (Current & future impact) Figure 12 Penetration & growth prospect mapping for products, 2016 & 2025 Figure 13 SWOT Analysis, By Factor (political & legal, economic and technological) Figure 14 Porters Five Forces Analysis Figure 15 Nanomedicine market product outlook key takeaways Figure 16 Nanomedicine market: Product movement analysis Figure 17 Global therapeutics market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 18 Global regenerative medicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 19 Global in-vitro diagnostics market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 20 Global in-vivo diagnostics market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 21 Global vaccines market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 22 Nanomedicine market: Application outlook key takeaways Figure 23 Global nanomedicine market: Application movement analysis Figure 24 Cancer cases per year Figure 25 Global clinical oncology market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 26 Global infectious diseases market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 27 Global clinical cardiology market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 28 Global orthopedics market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 29 Global other applications market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 30 Nanomedicine market: Nanomolecule type outlook key takeaways Figure 31 Global nanomedicine market: Nanomolecule type movement analysis Figure 32 Global nanomolecules market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 33 Global nanoparticles & quantum dots market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 34 Global metal & metal compounds nanoparticles market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 35 Global gold nanoparticles market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 36 Global silver nanoparticles market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 37 Global alumina nanoparticles market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 38 Global iron oxide nanoparticles market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 39 Global gadolinium nanoparticles market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 40 Global other metal & metal oxide nanoparticles market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 41 Global in-vivo imaging market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 42 Global targeted drug delivery market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 43 Global proton therapy market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 44 Global in-vitro assays market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 45 Global cell & phantom imaging market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 46 Global liposomes market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 47 Global polymer & polymer drug conjugates market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 48 Global hydrogel nanoparticles market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 49 Global dendrimers market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 50 Global inorganic nanoparticles market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 51 Global nanoshells market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 52 Global nanotubes market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 53 Global nanodevices market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 54 Regional market place: Key take away Figure 55 Nanomedicine regional outlook, 2016 & 2025 Figure 56 North America nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 57 U.S. nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 58 Canada. nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 59 Europe nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 60 Germany nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 61 UK nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 62 Asia Pacific nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 63 Japan nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 64 China nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 65 Latin America nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 66 Brazil nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 67 Middle East & Africa nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 68 South Africa nanomedicine market, 2013 – 2025 (USD Billion) Figure 69 Strategy framework Figure 70 Participant categorization

See the original post:
Nanomedicine Market Analysis By Products, (Therapeutics, Regenerative …

Read the Rest...

Report on Nanomedicine Market includes growth rate, market … – satPRnews (press release)

§ May 25th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Report on Nanomedicine Market includes growth rate, market … – satPRnews (press release)

Nanomedicine Market report provides key statistics on the market status of the Nanomedicine Manufacturers and is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals interested in the Nanomedicine Industry. The Nanomedicine industry report firstly announced the Nanomedicine Market fundamentals: definitions, classifications, applications and market overview; product specifications; manufacturing processes; cost structures, raw materials and so on.

Nanomedicine Market split by Application -Application 1, Application 2, Application 3 Nanomedicine Market Segment by Regions (North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific) and the main countries (United States, Germany, United Kingdom, Japan, South Korea and China).

Through the statistical analysis, the Nanomedicine Market report depicts the global Industry Analysis, Manufacturers Analysis, Nanomedicine Industry Development Trend, Sales Demand and Forecast to 2021.

Get PDF Sample of Nanomedicine Market Report @ https://www.absolutereports.com/enquiry/request-sample/10485049

Table of Contents:

Chapter 1 Nanomedicine Market Overview

1.1 Definition

1.2 Classification Analysis

1.3 Application Analysis

1.4 Nanomedicine Industry Chain Structure Analysis

1.5 Nanomedicine Market Development Overview

1.6 Global Nanomedicine Market Comparison Analysis

1.6.1 Global Import Market Analysis

1.6.2 Global Export Market Analysis

1.6.3 Global Main Region Market Analysis

1.6.4 Global Market Comparison Analysis

1.6.5 Global Market Development Trend Analysis

Chapter 2 Nanomedicine Up and Down Stream Industry Analysis

2.1 Upstream Raw Materials Analysis of Nanomedicine Market

2.1.1 Upstream Raw Materials Price Analysis

2.1.2 Upstream Raw Materials Market Analysis

2.1.3 Upstream Raw Materials Market Trend

2.2 Down Stream Market Analysis of Nanomedicine Market

2.1.1 Down Stream Market Analysis

2.2.2 Down Stream Demand Analysis

2.2.3 Down Stream Market Trend Analysis

Inquire for further detailed information about Nanomedicine Market Report @ https://www.absolutereports.com/enquiry/pre-order-enquiry/10485049

Chapter 3 Nanomedicine Productions Supply Sales Demand Market Status and Forecast

3.1 2012-2017 Nanomedicine Market Capacity Production Overview

3.2 2012-2017 Nanomedicine Production Market Share Analysis

3.3 2012-2017 Nanomedicine Market Demand Overview

3.4 2012-2017 Supply Demand and Shortage of Nanomedicine Industry

3.5 2012-2017 Nanomedicine Import Export Consumption

3.6 2012-2017 Nanomedicine Cost Price Production Value Gross Margin

In the end Nanomedicine Market report provides the main region, market conditions with the product price, profit, capacity, production, supply, demand and market growth rate and forecast etc. Nanomedicine Market report also Present new project SWOT analysis, investment feasibility analysis, and investment return analysis.

See original here:
Report on Nanomedicine Market includes growth rate, market … – satPRnews (press release)

Read the Rest...

What is nanomedicine, and how can it improve childhood cancer treatment? – Phys.Org

§ May 24th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on What is nanomedicine, and how can it improve childhood cancer treatment? – Phys.Org

May 24, 2017 by Maria Kavallaris, Joshua Mccarroll And Thomas P Davis, The Conversation Therapies on a nano scale rely on engineered nanoparticles designed to package and deliver drugs to exactly where theyre needed. Credit: shutterstock.com

A recent US study of people treated for cancer as children from the 1970s to 1999 showed that although survival rates have improved over the years, the quality of life for survivors is low. It also showed this was worse for those who were treated in the 1990s.

About 70% of childhood cancer survivors experience side effects from their treatment, including secondary cancers. And as survival rates improve, the worldwide population of childhood cancer survivors is growing.

Side effects cause stress for survivors and families and increase demand on health systems. But an emerging area of medicine, nanomedicine, offers hope for better children’s cancer treatment that will have fewer side effects and improve quality of life for survivors.

What is nanomedicine?

Nanomedicine is the application of nanomaterials, or nanoparticles, to medicine. Nanoparticles are a form of transport for drugs and can go places drugs wouldn’t be able to go on their own.

Nano means tiny. A nanometre (nm) is one-billionth of a metre. Nanoparticles used for drug delivery are usually in the 20 to 100 nanometre range, although this can vary depending on the design of the nanoparticle.

Nanoparticles can be engineered and designed to package and transport drugs directly to where they’re needed. This targeted approach means the drugs cause most harm in the particular, and intended, area of the tumour they are delivered to. This minimises collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissues, and therefore the side effects.

The first cancer nanomedicine approved by the US Food and Drug Administration was Doxil. Since 1995, it has been used to treat adult cancers including ovarian cancer, multiple myeloma and Karposi’s sarcoma (a rare cancer that often affects people with immune deficiency such as HIV and AIDS).

Currently, there is a stream of new nanomedicine treatments for adult cancers in clinical trials (trials in humans), or on the market. But only a limited number of these have been approved for children’s cancers, although this is arguably where nanomedicine’s strengths could have the most benefit.

How does nanomedicine work?

The nanoparticle drug-delivery systems can work in different ways. Along with carrying the drug for delivery, nanoparticles can be engineered to carry specific compounds that will let them bind, or attach, to molecules on tumour cells. Once attached, they can safety deliver the drug to the specific tumour site.

Nanoparticles can also help with drug solubility. For a drug to work, it must be able to enter the bloodstream, which means it needs to be soluble. For example, the cancer drug paclitaxel (Taxol) is insoluble so has to be dissolved in a delivery agent to get into the blood. But this agent can cause allergic reactions in patients.

To overcome these issues, chemists have developed a nanoparticle out of the naturally occurring protein albumin. It carries the paclitaxel and makes it soluble but without the allergic reactions.

Tumours commonly have disordered and leaky blood vessels sprouting through and off them. These vessels allow chemotherapy drugs to readily enter the tumour, but because chemotherapy molecules are so small, they also diffuse through the vessels and out of the tumour, attacking surrounding tissues. Nanoparticles are larger molecules that get trapped inside the tumour, where they do all the damage.

Once they have delivered their drug cargo to cells, nanoparticles can be designed to break down into harmless byproducts. This is particularly important for children who are still developing.

Types of nanoparticles

Nanoparticles vary in characteristics like shape and size. Researchers need to match the right nanoparticle to the drug it’s to deliver and the particular tumour.

An array of nanoparticle structures are currently being engineered. One example of an interesting structure is the shape of a DNA origami. Because DNA is a biological material, nanoparticles engineered into DNA origami shapes won’t be seen as foreign by the immune system. So these can transport a drug to diseased cells while evading the body’s immune system, therefore lessening the side effects of drugs.

Another example of nanomedicine structures are polymeric nanocarriers. We have recently identified a gene that promotes the growth of tumours, cancer spread and resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancers.

We used a nanomedicine called a polymeric nanocarrier and combined it with a drug that silences the cancer gene. We packaged this up to form a nanomedicine and delivered the drugs into the tumour.

These nanomedicines reduced the expression of the cancer gene, blocked tumour growth and reduced the spread of pancreatic cancer. But we also showed that polymeric nanocarriers can be combined in the lab with other gene-silencing drugs. This means the method can be used for a range of other gene-based cancers.

How can nanomedicines help treat kids’ cancer?

In standard treatment for children’s cancer, chemotherapy drugs are often prescribed at the maximum tolerable dose for a child’s age or size, based on adult dosages. But children aren’t small adults. The processes underlying children’s growth and development might lead to a different effect and response to a chemotherapy drug not seen in adults.

Also, if a child becomes resistant to a drug and they’re on the maximum tolerable dose, there’s no scope to increase it without toxic side effects. By packaging up drugs and moving them through the body directly to diseased cells to reduce collateral damage, in theory, nanomedicine allows higher doses of drugs to be used.

Nanomedicine has great potential to safely treat children’s cancer. However, it is currently stymied by too little research. About two-thirds of research attention in nanomedicine therapeutics, of more 250 nanomedicine products, is focused on cancer. Yet this isn’t translating into new cancer treatments for children coming to market.

But we are making progress. Our work is exploring the design of nanoparticles to deliver gene-silencing drugs to treat the most common brain cancer in children medulloblastoma.

We’re also working on nanomedicines for other significant childhood cancers. These include drug-refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common childhood cancer, and neuroblastoma, the cancer that claims more lives of those under five than any other.

Explore further: New nanotechnology application for difficult-to-treat cancers

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

A new treatment combining shock waves with nanoparticles can successfully treat tumours that are difficult to target using conventional chemotherapy. This is the first time this combined therapy has been tested in live animals. …

Australian cancer researchers have developed a highly promising nanomedicine that could improve treatment for pancreatic cancer the most deadly cancer in Australia.

Nanomedicine has the potential to help personalize cancer treatments and reduce side effects of therapeutic drugs. While some progress has been made toward the latter goal, customized treatments are still hard to come by. …

A Mayo Clinic research team has developed a new type of cancer-fighting nanoparticle aimed at shrinking breast cancer tumors, while also preventing recurrence of the disease. In the study, published today in Nature Nanotechnology, …

New research carried out by drug delivery experts at The University of Nottingham has highlighted more advantages to using nanoparticles for the delivery of cancer drugs.

Targeting cancer cells for destruction while leaving healthy cells alonethat has been the promise of the emerging field of cancer nanomedicine. But a new meta-analysis from U of T’s Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical …

Researchers from AMOLF and Swiss EPFL have shown that the surface of minuscule water drops surrounded by a hydrophobic substance such as oil is surprisingly ordered. At room temperature, the surface water molecules of these …

Computers process and transfer data through electrical currents passing through tiny circuits and wires. As these currents meet with resistance, they create heat that can undermine the efficiency and even the safety of these …

Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are layered semiconductors that can be exfoliated into layers only a few atoms thick. Recent research has shown that some TMDs can contain quantum light sources that can emit single …

Inspired by how mammals see, a new “memristor” computer circuit prototype at the University of Michigan has the potential to process complex data, such as images and video orders of magnitude, faster and with much less power …

Scientists at Rice University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) have discovered that laser-induced graphene (LIG) is a highly effective anti-fouling material and, when electrified, bacteria zapper.

Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists have created a graphene-based sensor that could lead to earlier detection of looming asthma attacks and improve the management of asthma and other respiratory diseases, preventing …

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

The rest is here:
What is nanomedicine, and how can it improve childhood cancer treatment? – Phys.Org

Read the Rest...

Research and Markets – Global $350.8 Billion Nanomedicine Market Analysis 2013 – 2025: Major Players are Pfizer … – PR Newswire (press release)

§ May 24th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Research and Markets – Global $350.8 Billion Nanomedicine Market Analysis 2013 – 2025: Major Players are Pfizer … – PR Newswire (press release)

The global nanomedicine market is anticipated to reach USD 350.8 billion by 2025

Development of novel nanotechnology-based drugs and therapies is driven by the need to develop therapies that have fewer side effects and that are more cost-effective than traditional therapies, in particular for cancer.

Application of nanotechnology-based contrast reagents for diagnosis and monitoring of the effects of drugs on an unprecedented short timescale is also attributive drive growth in the coming years. Additionally, demand for biodegradable implants with longer lifetimes that enable tissue restoration is anticipated to influence demand.

As per the WHO factsheet, cancer is found to be one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with approximately 14 million new cases in 2012 and 8.2 million cancer-related deaths. Thus, demand for nanomedicine in order to curb such high incidence rate is expected to boost market progress during the forecast period.

Solutions such as nanoformulations with triggered release for tailor-made pharmacokinetics, nanoparticles for local control of tumor in combination with radiotherapy, and functionalized nanoparticles for targeted in-vivo activation of stem cell production are anticipated to drive R&D, consequently resulting in revenue generation in the coming years.

Biopharmaceutical and medical devices companies are actively engaged in development of novel products as demonstrated by the increasingly growing partnerships between leading enterprises and nanomedicine startups. For instance, in November 2015, Ablynx and Novo Nordisk signed a global collaboration and a licensing agreement for development and discovery of innovative drugs with multi-specific nanobodies. This strategic partnership is anticipated to rise the net annual sales of the products uplifting the market growth.

However, in contrary with the applications of nanotechnology, the entire process of lab to market approval is a tedious and expensive one with stringent regulatory evaluation involved thereby leading investors to remain hesitant for investments.

Further key findings from the report suggest:

Key Topics Covered:

1 Research Methodology

2 Executive Summary

3 Nanomedicine Market Variables, Trends & Scope

4 Nanomedicine Market: Product Estimates & Trend Analysis

5 Nanomedicine Market: Application Estimates & Trend Analysis

6 Nanomedicine Market: Nanomolecule Type Estimates & Trend Analysis

7 Nanomedicine Market: Regional Estimates & Trend Analysis, by Product, Application, & Nanomolecule Type

8 Competitive Landscape

For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/vgtxtn/nanomedicine

Media Contact:

Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com

For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900

U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/research-and-markets—global-3508-billion-nanomedicine-market-analysis-2013—2025-major-players-are-pfizer-ablynx-nanotherapeutics-nanoviricides-abraxis-arrowhead-research-celgene-corporation-bio-gate–merck-300462286.html

SOURCE Research and Markets

http://www.researchandmarkets.com

More here:
Research and Markets – Global $350.8 Billion Nanomedicine Market Analysis 2013 – 2025: Major Players are Pfizer … – PR Newswire (press release)

Read the Rest...

Explainer: what is nanomedicine and how can it improve childhood cancer treatment? – The Conversation AU

§ May 23rd, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Explainer: what is nanomedicine and how can it improve childhood cancer treatment? – The Conversation AU

Therapies on a nano scale rely on engineered nanoparticles designed to package and deliver drugs to exactly where theyre needed.

A recent US study of people treated for cancer as children from the 1970s to 1999 showed that although survival rates have improved over the years, the quality of life for survivors is low. It also showed this was worse for those who were treated in the 1990s.

About 70% of childhood cancer survivors experience side effects from their treatment, including secondary cancers. And as survival rates improve, the worldwide population of childhood cancer survivors is growing.

Side effects cause stress for survivors and families and increase demand on health systems. But an emerging area of medicine, nanomedicine, offers hope for better childrens cancer treatment that will have fewer side effects and improve quality of life for survivors.

Nanomedicine is the application of nanomaterials, or nanoparticles, to medicine. Nanoparticles are a form of transport for drugs and can go places drugs wouldnt be able to go on their own.

Nano means tiny. A nanometre (nm) is one-billionth of a metre. Nanoparticles used for drug delivery are usually in the 20 to 100 nanometre range, although this can vary depending on the design of the nanoparticle.

Nanoparticles can be engineered and designed to package and transport drugs directly to where theyre needed. This targeted approach means the drugs cause most harm in the particular, and intended, area of the tumour they are delivered to. This minimises collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissues, and therefore the side effects.

The first cancer nanomedicine approved by the US Food and Drug Administration was Doxil. Since 1995, it has been used to treat adult cancers including ovarian cancer, multiple myeloma and Karposis sarcoma (a rare cancer that often affects people with immune deficiency such as HIV and AIDS).

Currently, there is a stream of new nanomedicine treatments for adult cancers in clinical trials (trials in humans), or on the market. But only a limited number of these have been approved for childrens cancers, although this is arguably where nanomedicines strengths could have the most benefit.

The nanoparticle drug-delivery systems can work in different ways. Along with carrying the drug for delivery, nanoparticles can be engineered to carry specific compounds that will let them bind, or attach, to molecules on tumour cells. Once attached, they can safety deliver the drug to the specific tumour site.

Nanoparticles can also help with drug solubility. For a drug to work, it must be able to enter the bloodstream, which means it needs to be soluble. For example, the cancer drug paclitaxel (Taxol) is insoluble so has to be dissolved in a delivery agent to get into the blood. But this agent can cause allergic reactions in patients.

To overcome these issues, chemists have developed a nanoparticle out of the naturally occurring protein albumin. It carries the paclitaxel and makes it soluble but without the allergic reactions.

Tumours commonly have disordered and leaky blood vessels sprouting through and off them. These vessels allow chemotherapy drugs to readily enter the tumour, but because chemotherapy molecules are so small, they also diffuse through the vessels and out of the tumour, attacking surrounding tissues. Nanoparticles are larger molecules that get trapped inside the tumour, where they do all the damage.

Once they have delivered their drug cargo to cells, nanoparticles can be designed to break down into harmless byproducts. This is particularly important for children who are still developing.

Nanoparticles vary in characteristics like shape and size. Researchers need to match the right nanoparticle to the drug its to deliver and the particular tumour.

An array of nanoparticle structures are currently being engineered. One example of an interesting structure is the shape of a DNA origami. Because DNA is a biological material, nanoparticles engineered into DNA origami shapes wont be seen as foreign by the immune system. So these can transport a drug to diseased cells while evading the bodys immune system, therefore lessening the side effects of drugs.

Another example of nanomedicine structures are polymeric nanocarriers. We have recently identified a gene that promotes the growth of tumours, cancer spread and resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancers.

We used a nanomedicine called a polymeric nanocarrier and combined it with a drug that silences the cancer gene. We packaged this up to form a nanomedicine and delivered the drugs into the tumour.

These nanomedicines reduced the expression of the cancer gene, blocked tumour growth and reduced the spread of pancreatic cancer. But we also showed that polymeric nanocarriers can be combined in the lab with other gene-silencing drugs. This means the method can be used for a range of other gene-based cancers.

In standard treatment for childrens cancer, chemotherapy drugs are often prescribed at the maximum tolerable dose for a childs age or size, based on adult dosages. But children arent small adults. The processes underlying childrens growth and development might lead to a different effect and response to a chemotherapy drug not seen in adults.

Also, if a child becomes resistant to a drug and theyre on the maximum tolerable dose, theres no scope to increase it without toxic side effects. By packaging up drugs and moving them through the body directly to diseased cells to reduce collateral damage, in theory, nanomedicine allows higher doses of drugs to be used.

Nanomedicine has great potential to safely treat childrens cancer. However, it is currently stymied by too little research. About two-thirds of research attention in nanomedicine therapeutics, of more 250 nanomedicine products, is focused on cancer. Yet this isnt translating into new cancer treatments for children coming to market.

But we are making progress. Our work is exploring the design of nanoparticles to deliver gene-silencing drugs to treat the most common brain cancer in children medulloblastoma.

Were also working on nanomedicines for other significant childhood cancers. These include drug-refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common childhood cancer, and neuroblastoma, the cancer that claims more lives of those under five than any other.

More here:
Explainer: what is nanomedicine and how can it improve childhood cancer treatment? – The Conversation AU

Read the Rest...

Nanomedicine: A Vast Horizon on a Molecular Landscape – Part X, Magnetic Nanoparticles theranostics II – Lexology (registration)

§ May 23rd, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Nanomedicine: A Vast Horizon on a Molecular Landscape – Part X, Magnetic Nanoparticles theranostics II – Lexology (registration)

This is the tenth article in a review series on Nanomedicine. We started the series by reviewing the major research areas and entrepreneurial developments in nanomedicine and the relevant patent landscape (Part I and Part II). Following that, we discussed organs-on-a-chip (Part III and Part VIIII), nanotechnology in medical therapeutics: nanoparticles for drug delivery (Part IV), cancer therapeutics (Part V), and bio-imaging (Part VI), and nanoparticles with specific functions: quantum dots for bioimaging and therapy (Part VII) and magnetic nanoparticles for diagnosis (Part VIII). Here, we continue review of the theranostic applications and IP landscape of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). As in the past, those patent documents cited in the article are summarized in the table at the end.

MNPs as a dual modality for cancer imaging Magnetic nanoparticles are superior imaging contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) due to the intrinsic magnetic properties of nanoparticles. As of 2012, the FDA has approved several MNPs as MRI contrast agents or therapeutic agents: ferumoxides (also known as Feridex in the USA) as an MRI contrast agent for imaging liver lesions; ferucarbotran (also known as Resovist) as MRI contrast agent for imaging liver lesions; ferumoxsil (also known as GastroMARK or Lumirem) as an orally administered MRI contrast agent; and ferumoxytol (also known as Feraheme) as an intravenously administered nanoparticle to treat iron deficiency in adults with chronic kidney disease.

With surface molecular modification, MNPs can be functionalized with suitable fluorescent dyes and radionuclides to enable multimodal imaging, for example, optical imaging, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging and Computed Tomography (CT) imaging. The advantage of multimodal imaging helps to ensure the conformance of cancer diagnosis through the combination of complementary strengths of different imaging techniques. Dr. Gang Bao at Rice University and Dr. Shuming Nie at Emory University developed fluorescent label conjugated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for deep-tissue imaging (US 7,459,145). Dr. Anna Moore at Harvard Medical School developed a gold coated iron oxide nanoparticle with a further dextran coating layer for dual modality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging (US 8,563,043). Dr. Rafael T.M. de Rosales at Kings College London conjugated a 64Cu radiolable with dithiocarbamate (DTC) and bisphosphonates (BP) to form a [64Cu(dtcbp)2] complex. This complex was further labeled with clinically available dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for MRI/PET dual modality imaging (WO2011151631). In vivo studies with these particles in the lymphatic system successfully detected the early spread of cancer. Dr. Weibo Cai at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Dr. Shaoqin Gong at the University of Wisconsin-Madison developed a water-soluble SPION with 64Cu chelators for MRI/PET dual modality imaging. These nanoparticles were conjugated with cRGD peptides (i.e. a tripeptide of arginine, glycine, and aspartic acid) to target tumors with integrin avb3 expression and to also carry an anticancer drug for targeted tumor treatment.

MNPs for targeted drug delivery MNPs can accumulate at a target tissue through an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Beyond this passive targeting, the surface molecular modification of MNPs enables the active targeting at specific biomarkers of malignant tissues. The multifunctionality of MNPs allows the selective delivery of drugs to the desired location for therapy. Dr. J. Manuel Perez at the University of Central Florida used a co-encapsulation strategy to coat both a near infrared (NIR) dye and a chemotherapeutic agent, taxol, with polyacrylic acid (PAA) on SPIONs. These SPIONs were further conjugated with a folic acid ligand to target folate expressing cancer cells. This combination enabled a theranostic with MRI/optical dual modality imaging and cancer cell targeting (US 8,821,837 and US 8,372,944). Dr. Xiaoyuan Chen at the National Institutes of Health conjugated the anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), with a human serum albumin (HAS) coated iron oxide nanoparticle. In a murine breast cancer model, the modified MNPs induced tumor reduction and demonstrated a better therapeutic effect than a DOX only treatment. Dr. Michael Welch and Dr. Wooley Karen at Washington University developed a shell-crosslinked knedel (SCK) nanoparticle with peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) to enhance cell uptake of the nanoparticles and facilitate drug delivery (US 8,354,093).

MNPs for localized hyperthermia treatments Another unique feature of MNPs is the hyperthermia effect that can be induced under an alternating magnetic field. When the external magnetic field is oscillating, the MNPs continuously rotate to align with the magnetic field. Under this circumstance, the MNPs absorb electromagnetic energy and transform it into heat energy, locally increasing the temperature of their surroundings. Therefore, the temperature of tumor cells targeted by such MNPs can be increased in the range of 43-47 oC and undergo intra- and extracellular degradation mechanisms causing cell death. The advantage of MNP induced hyperthermia is that it is highly localized and has minimal effect on nearby healthy tissues.

Dr. Jinwoo Cheon at Yonsei University synthesized CoFe2O4@MnFe2O4 core-shell nanoparticles and administered these nanoparticles to mice with xenografted human brain cancer cells. The magnetic hyperthermia treatment by these core-shell MNPs demonstrated better results on tumor elimination compared to Feridex. Dr. Cheons particle also provided effective hyperthermia treatment versus control groups, showing a similar effect to core-shell MNPs conjugated to doxorubicin (US 8,066,969). Dr. Matthew Basel synthesized paramagnetic iron/iron oxide nanoparticles and loaded these into mouse monocyte/macrophage-like cells to target tumor cells. These MNPs specifically targeted pancreatic tumors and induced localized hyperthermia for cancer treatment (US 20120157824). Dr. James Hainfeld applied MNPs through intravenous injection to target subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in mice. An alternating external magnetic field was used to induce hyperthermia to ablate the tumor cell while leaving the surrounding healthy tissue intact (US 7,906,147).

In 2013, MagForce, a German company, announced the approval by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) of a new product, NanoTherm, the treatment of primary or recurrent glioblastoma multiforme, which is a lethal brain tumor with limited treatment options. The new treatment depends on direct injection of the MNPs to tumors and localized hyperthermia for delivering the cancer treatment (US 9,345,768). Clinical trial in 66 patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme showed longer overall survival with MNP treatment. Currently NanoTherm has been released in 27 European countries.

Summary Besides the currently approved MNPs by FDA as MRI contrast agents or therapeutic agents, researchers and scientists are actively developing new MNPs with combined imaging and therapeutic functions to take advantage of the theranostic property of MNPs to enhance clinic outcomes. We are expecting more new products to be clinically approved in the coming years.

View post:
Nanomedicine: A Vast Horizon on a Molecular Landscape – Part X, Magnetic Nanoparticles theranostics II – Lexology (registration)

Read the Rest...

Holographic microscope provides a new tool for nanomedicine to rapidly measure degradation of drug loaded … – Phys.Org

§ May 18th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Holographic microscope provides a new tool for nanomedicine to rapidly measure degradation of drug loaded … – Phys.Org

May 18, 2017 An illustration of a cost-effective method to rapidly monitor the degradation of drug carrying nanoparticles using a chip-scale microscope. Credit: UCLA Ozcan Research Group

UCLA researchers have developed a cost-effective method to rapidly monitor the degradation of drug-carrying nanoparticles using a chip-scale microscope. This nanoparticle characterization platform is based on holography and can accurately monitor the size changes of nanocapsules undergoing degradation, while releasing the contents of their drug cargo. This research provides scientists with a powerful measurement tool that can be used to design better nanocapsules for drug delivery and other nanomedicine-related applications.

Nanotechnology has gained practical importance, including in drug delivery. The global market for nanomedicine is estimated to reach $350 billion USD by 2025. Design and synthesis of degradable nanoparticles are very important in drug delivery and nanomedicine fields. Although accurate assessment of nanoparticle degradation rates would improve the characterization and optimization of drug delivery vehicles, traditional approaches that are used to monitor drug release from nanoparticles and nanocapsules rely on using advanced technology such as electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, or other biochemical methods, all of which have drawbacks and practical limitations. Most of these instruments are expensive, and do not have the ability to monitor nanoparticle degradation in real time.

UCLA’s holographic imaging method, on the other hand, has an accuracy close to the higher-end measurement devices, but at a fraction of their cost and complexity. It was built using 3-D printed parts and comprises low-cost optical elements, forming a chip-scale optical microscope that weighs about a pound and can be operated using any desktop or laptop computer. This holographic nanoparticle characterization tool can be used to measure the size of individual nanoparticles over a wide range of particle densities, from a few tens to tens of thousands of nanoparticles per micro-liter, and can detect nanoparticles as small as ~40 nm.

“Through this collaboration between my lab and Professor Tatiana Segura’s lab at UCLA, we have created a powerful and cost-effective computational method that enables high-throughput monitoring of the degradation of any type of nanoparticle using an extremely small sample volume that is at least 1000-fold smaller than what is required by other optical techniques, providing additional cost savings per measurement,” said Aydogan Ozcan, who led the research team and is UCLA’s Chancellor’s Professor of Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering and associate director of the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI).

Dr. Ozcan and his collaborator, Dr. Segura from the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at UCLA, along with postdoctoral scholars, Drs. Aniruddha Ray and Shuoran Li, utilized this holographic imaging method to characterize a polymer-based nanocapsule system used to deliver vascular endothelial growth factor, a protein that can help in stroke recovery and wound healing. Growth factors are especially critical for regular cell function and their incorporation within therapeutic nanomaterials has been a major focus of recent research, making this new holographic nanoparticle characterization tool very timely.

Explore further: Mobile device can accurately and inexpensively monitor air quality using machine learning

More information: Aniruddha Ray et al. High-Throughput Quantification of Nanoparticle Degradation Using Computational Microscopy and Its Application to Drug Delivery Nanocapsules, ACS Photonics (2017). DOI: 10.1021/acsphotonics.7b00122

UCLA researchers have developed a cost-effective mobile device to measure air quality. It works by detecting pollutants and determining their concentration and size using a mobile microscope connected to a smartphone and …

A nanoparticle-based drug delivery system that can sense and respond to different conditions in the body, as well as to an externally applied magnetic field, could enhance doctors’ ability to target drugs to specific sites …

Delivering life-saving drugs directly to the brain in a safe and effective way is a challenge for medical providers. One key reason: the blood-brain barrier, which protects the brain from tissue-specific drug delivery. Methods …

Holograms offer a means of increasing data storage density that may help to meet the demands of ever decreasing device sizes and increasing memory requirements. Kohta Nagaya, Eiji Hata and Yasuo Tomita at the University of …

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego developed a new technology that uses an oscillating electric field to easily and quickly isolate drug-delivery nanoparticles from blood. The technology could serve as a …

UCLA researchers working with a team at Verily Life Sciences have designed a mobile microscope that can detect and monitor fluorescent biomarkers inside the skin with a high level of sensitivity, an important tool in tracking …

Rice University scientists have created a rechargeable lithium metal battery with three times the capacity of commercial lithium-ion batteries by resolving something that has long stumped researchers: the dendrite problem.

Nanocrystals have diverse applications spanning biomedical imaging, light-emitting devices, and consumer electronics. Their unique optical properties result from the type of crystal from which they are composed. However, …

Today’s computers are faster and smaller than ever before. The latest generation of transistors will have structural features with dimensions of only 10 nanometers. If computers are to become even faster and at the same time …

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bitsor qubitsthat are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs …

Possibly the strongest hybrid silk fibers to date have been created by scientists in Sweden using all-renewable resources. Combining spider silk proteins with nanocellulose from wood, the process offers a low-cost and scalable …

Chemists, materials scientists and nanoengineers at UC San Diego have created what may be the ultimate natural sunscreen.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Visit link:
Holographic microscope provides a new tool for nanomedicine to rapidly measure degradation of drug loaded … – Phys.Org

Read the Rest...

How can we exploit the protein corona?, Nanomedicine, Future …

§ May 16th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on How can we exploit the protein corona?, Nanomedicine, Future …

This site uses cookies to improve performance. If your browser does not accept cookies, you cannot view this site.

There are many reasons why a cookie could not be set correctly. Below are the most common reasons:

This site uses cookies to improve performance by remembering that you are logged in when you go from page to page. To provide access without cookies would require the site to create a new session for every page you visit, which slows the system down to an unacceptable level.

This site stores nothing other than an automatically generated session ID in the cookie; no other information is captured.

In general, only the information that you provide, or the choices you make while visiting a web site, can be stored in a cookie. For example, the site cannot determine your email name unless you choose to type it. Allowing a website to create a cookie does not give that or any other site access to the rest of your computer, and only the site that created the cookie can read it.

Excerpt from:
How can we exploit the protein corona?, Nanomedicine, Future …

Read the Rest...

« Older Entries





Page 11234..1020..»