Page 11234..1020..»

Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) Market to Perceive Substantial Growth During 2015 to 2021 – MilTech

§ March 24th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) Market to Perceive Substantial Growth During 2015 to 2021 – MilTech

New York, NY (SBWIRE) 03/23/2017 Nanotechnology is one of the most promising technologies in 21st century. Nanotechnology is a term used when technological developments occur at 0.1 to 100 nm scale. Nano medicine is a branch of nanotechnology which involves medicine development at molecular scale for diagnosis, prevention, treatment of diseases and even regeneration of tissues and organs. Thus it helps to preserve and improve human health. Nanomedicine offers an impressive solution for various life threatening diseases such as cancer, Parkinson, Alzheimer, diabetes, orthopedic problems, diseases related to blood, lungs, neurological, and cardiovascular system.

A sample of this report is available upon request @ http://www.persistencemarketresearch.com/samples/6370

Development of a new nenomedicine takes several years which are based on various technologies such as dendrimers, micelles, nanocrystals, fullerenes, virosome nanoparticles, nanopores, liposomes, nanorods, nanoemulsions, quantum dots, and nanorobots.

In the field of diagnosis, nanotechnology based methods are more precise, reliable and require minimum amount of biological sample which avoid considerable reduction in consumption of reagents and disposables. Apart from diagnosis, nanotechnology is more widely used in drug delivery purpose due to nanoscale particles with larger surface to volume ratio than micro and macro size particle responsible for higher drug loading. Nano size products allow to enter into body cavities for diagnosis or treatment with minimum invasiveness and increased bioavailability. This will not only improve the efficacy of treatment and diagnosis, but also reduces the side effects of drugs in case of targeted therapy.

Global nanomedicine market is majorly segmented on the basis of applications in medicines, targeted disease and geography. Applications segment includes drug delivery (carrier), drugs, biomaterials, active implant, in-vitro diagnostic, and in-vivo imaging. Global nanomedicine divided on the basis of targeted diseases or disorders in following segment: neurology, cardiovascular, oncology, anti-inflammatory, anti-infective and others. Geographically, nanomedicine market is classified into North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Latin America, and MEA. Considering nanomedicine market by application, drug delivery contribute higher followed by in-vitro diagnostics. Global nanomedicine market was dominated by oncology segment in 2012 due to ability of nanomedicine to cross body barriers and targeted to tumors specifically however cardiovascular nanomedicine market is fastest growing segment. Geographically, North America dominated the market in 2013 and is expected to maintain its position in the near future. Asia Pacific market is anticipated to grow at faster rate due to rapid increase in geriatric population and rising awareness regarding health care. Europe is expected to grow at faster rate than North America due to extensive product pipeline portfolio and constantly improving regulatory framework.

Major drivers for nanomedicine market include improved regulatory framework, increasing technological know-how and research funding, rising government support and continuous increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cancer, kidney disorder, and orthopedic diseases. Some other driving factors include rising number of geriatric population, awareness of nanomedicine application and presence of high unmet medical needs. Growing demand of nanomedicines from the end users is expected to drive the market in the forecast period. However, market entry of new companies is expected to bridge the gap between supply and demand of nanomedicines. Above mentioned drivers currently outweigh the risk associated with nanomedicines such as toxicity and high cost. At present, cancer is one of the major targeted areas in which nanomedicines have made contribution. Doxil, Depocyt, Abraxane, Oncospar, and Neulasta are some of the examples of pharmaceuticals formulated using nanotechnology.

To view TOC of this report is available upon request @ http://www.persistencemarketresearch.com/toc/6370

Key players in the global nanomedicine market include: Abbott Laboratories, CombiMatrix Corporation, GE Healthcare, Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Johnson & Johnson, Mallinckrodt plc, Merck & Company, Inc., Nanosphere, Inc., Pfizer, Inc., Celgene Corporation, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., and UCB (Union chimique belge) S.A.

View post:
Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) Market to Perceive Substantial Growth During 2015 to 2021 – MilTech

Read the Rest...

Research spotlights early signs of disease using infrared light: New … – Science Daily

§ March 22nd, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Research spotlights early signs of disease using infrared light: New … – Science Daily

Research spotlights early signs of disease using infrared light: New …
Science Daily
Researchers have used infrared spectroscopy to spotlight changes in tiny cell fragments called microvesicles to probe their role in a model of the body's …

and more »

Read more here:
Research spotlights early signs of disease using infrared light: New … – Science Daily

Read the Rest...

Global $392.80 Billion Nanomedicine Market Drivers, Opportunities, Trends, and Forecasts, 2023 – Research and … – Yahoo Finance

§ March 21st, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Global $392.80 Billion Nanomedicine Market Drivers, Opportunities, Trends, and Forecasts, 2023 – Research and … – Yahoo Finance

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the “Global Nanomedicine Market – Drivers, Opportunities, Trends, and Forecasts: 2017-2023” report to their offering.

The Nanomedicine Market to Grow at a CAGR of 17.1% During the Forecast Period 2017-2023 to Aggregate $392.80 Billion By 2023.

The nanomedicine market is analyzed based on two segments – therapeutic applications and regions.

The major drivers of the nanomedicine market include its application in various therapeutic areas, increasing R&D studies about nanorobots in this segment, and significant investments in clinical trials by the government as well as private sector. The Oncology segment is the major therapeutic area for nanomedicine application, which comprised more than 35% of the total market share in 2016. A major focus in this segment is expected to drive the growth of the nanomedicine market in the future.

Moreover, nanomedicines are introducing new therapeutic opportunities for a large number of agents that cannot be used effectively as conventional oral formulations due to poor bioavailability. The therapeutic areas for nanomedicine application are Oncology, Cardiovascular, Neurology, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-infectives, and various other areas.

Globally, the industry players are focusing significantly on R&D to gain approval for various clinical trials for future nano-drugs to be commercially available in the market. The FDA should be relatively prepared for some of the earliest and most basic applications of nanomedicine in areas such as gene therapy and tissue engineering. The more advanced applications of nanomedicine will pose unique challenges in terms of classification and maintenance of scientific expertise.

Market Dynamics

Drivers

Restraints

Opportunities

Key Players:

Key Topics Covered:

1 Industry Outlook

2 Report Outline

3 Market Snapshot

4 Market Outlook

5 Market Characteristics

6 Trends, Roadmap and Projects

7 Types: Market Size and Analysis

8 Trending Nanomedicines

9 Regions: Market Size and Analysis

10 Vendor Scenario

11 Vendor Profiles

12 Global Generalist

13 Companies to Watch for

14 Market Landscape

For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/2bv34j/global

View source version on businesswire.com: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170316005594/en/

See the rest here:
Global $392.80 Billion Nanomedicine Market Drivers, Opportunities, Trends, and Forecasts, 2023 – Research and … – Yahoo Finance

Read the Rest...

Global Nanomedicine Market 2017-2023: Emergence of Nanorobotics to Drive the Growth of the $392 Billion Industry … – Yahoo Finance

§ March 20th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Global Nanomedicine Market 2017-2023: Emergence of Nanorobotics to Drive the Growth of the $392 Billion Industry … – Yahoo Finance

DUBLIN, Mar 17, 2017 /PRNewswire/ —

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the “Global Nanomedicine Market – Drivers, Opportunities, Trends, and Forecasts: 2017-2023” report to their offering.

Research and Markets Logo

The Nanomedicine Market to Grow at a CAGR of 17.1% During the Forecast Period 2017-2023 to Aggregate $392.80 Billion By 2023

The nanomedicine market is analyzed based on two segments – therapeutic applications and regions.

The major drivers of the nanomedicine market include its application in various therapeutic areas, increasing R&D studies about nanorobots in this segment, and significant investments in clinical trials by the government as well as private sector. The Oncology segment is the major therapeutic area for nanomedicine application, which comprised more than 35% of the total market share in 2016. A major focus in this segment is expected to drive the growth of the nanomedicine market in the future.

Moreover, nanomedicines are introducing new therapeutic opportunities for a large number of agents that cannot be used effectively as conventional oral formulations due to poor bioavailability. The therapeutic areas for nanomedicine application are Oncology, Cardiovascular, Neurology, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-infectives, and various other areas.

Globally, the industry players are focusing significantly on R&D to gain approval for various clinical trials for future nano-drugs to be commercially available in the market. The FDA should be relatively prepared for some of the earliest and most basic applications of nanomedicine in areas such as gene therapy and tissue engineering. The more advanced applications of nanomedicine will pose unique challenges in terms of classification and maintenance of scientific expertise.

Key Topics Covered:

1 Industry Outlook 1.1 Industry Overview 1.2 Industry Trends 1.3 PEST Analysis

2 Report Outline 2.1 Report Scope 2.2 Report Summary 2.3 Research Methodology 2.4 Report Assumptions

3 Market Snapshot 3.1 Total Addressable Market (TAM) 3.2 Segmented Addressable Market (SAM) 3.3 Related Markets 3.3.1 mHealth Market 3.3.2 Healthcare Analytics Market

4 Market Outlook 4.1 Overview 4.2 Regulatory Bodies and Standards 4.3 Government Spending and Initiatives 4.4 Porter 5 (Five) Forces

5 Market Characteristics 5.1 Evolution 5.2 Ecosystem 5.2.1 Regulatory Process 5.2.2 Clinical Trials 5.2.3 Pricing and Reimbursement 5.3 Market Segmentation 5.4 Market Dynamics 5.4.1 Drivers 5.4.1.1 Emergence of nanorobotics 5.4.1.2 Applications and advantages of nanomedicine in various healthcare segments 5.4.1.3 Reasonable investments in R&D 5.4.1.4 Increased support from governments 5.4.2 Restraints 5.4.2.1 Long approval process and stringent regulations 5.4.2.2 Problems regarding nanoscale manufacturing 5.4.2.3 Risks related to nanomedicines 5.4.2.4 Undefined regulatory standards 5.4.3 Opportunities 5.4.3.1 Aging population with chronic care needs 5.4.3.2 Population and income growth in emerging countries 5.4.4 DRO – Impact Analysis

6 Trends, Roadmap and Projects 6.1 Market Trends and Impact 6.2 Technology Roadmap

7 Types: Market Size and Analysis 7.1 Overview 7.2 Global Nanomedicine Market in Oncology Segment 7.3 Global Nanomedicine Market in Cardiovascular Segment 7.4 Global Nanomedicine Market in Neurology Segment 7.5 Global Nanomedicine Market in Anti-inflammatory Segment 7.6 Global Nanomedicine Market in Anti-infective Segment 7.7 Global Nanomedicine Market in Other Therapeutic Areas

8 Trending Nanomedicines 8.1 Overview 8.2 Abraxane 8.3 Alimta 8.4 Eligard 8.5 Copaxone 8.6 Rapamune 8.7 Neulasta 8.8 Cimzia 8.9 AmBisome 8.10 Mircera 8.11 Pegasys 8.12 Emend 8.13 Renagel 8.14 Ritalin

9 Regions: Market Size and Analysis 9.1 Overview 9.1.1 Global Nanomedicine Market by Geographical Segmentation 9.2 Key Leading Countries 9.2.1 US 9.2.2 Germany 9.2.3 Japan

10 Vendor Scenario

11 Vendor Profiles 11.1 Merck & Co. Inc. 11.2 Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. 11.3 Gilead Sciences 11.4 Novartis AG 11.5 Amgen Inc.

12 Global Generalist 12.1 Pfizer Inc. 12.2 Eli Lilly and Company 12.3 Sanofi

13 Companies to Watch for 13.1 Nanobiotix SA 13.2 UCB SA

14 Market Landscape

For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/krjtrq/global

Read More

View original post here:
Global Nanomedicine Market 2017-2023: Emergence of Nanorobotics to Drive the Growth of the $392 Billion Industry … – Yahoo Finance

Read the Rest...

Block copolymer micellization as a protection strategy for DNA origami – Science Daily

§ March 18th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Block copolymer micellization as a protection strategy for DNA origami – Science Daily


Science Daily
Block copolymer micellization as a protection strategy for DNA origami
Science Daily
Due to this unique control over matter on the nanometer-scale, DNA nanostructures have also been considered for applications in molecular biology and nanomedicine. For example, they can be used as programmable drug carriers, diagnostic devices or to …

and more »

Continue reading here:
Block copolymer micellization as a protection strategy for DNA origami – Science Daily

Read the Rest...

3rd April London European Nanomedicine Meeting 2017 – Business News Wales

§ March 16th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on 3rd April London European Nanomedicine Meeting 2017 – Business News Wales

Life Sciences Hub Wales is the focal point for the Life Sciences sector in Wales stimulating innovation, collaboration and investment.

The Hub is the nerve centre for the eco-system in Wales, facilitating and encouraging innovation, aligning research with commercialisation, providing access to finance and expertise, and supporting business development in existing organisations.

Bringing together all facets of the network in Wales including academic, business, clinical, government, professional services and funding organisations, the Hub provides a commercially-driven resource for the sector.

The Hub hosts and engages organisations large and small and not only those in Life Sciences but a fully engaged network of professional services providing expertise and support to the sector.

Member organisations and partners benefit from a dedicated venue and a single access point to bespoke facilities, co-ordinated support, networking opportunities, professional advice, exclusive events, and most importantly promotional and funding opportunities.

Business and organisations working at the Hub include those operating in Pharmaceutical, Medical Technology, Biotechnology, Research & Development, Diagnostics, Clinical, Funding, Service & Supply Chain, and Business Support.

Get in touch to find out how your business or organisation can benefit from working with the Hub and discover more about our network of entrepreneurs, academics, SMEs and multinational corporations, and find out more about Wales impact on the global Life Sciences eco-system.

See the article here:
3rd April London European Nanomedicine Meeting 2017 – Business News Wales

Read the Rest...

Dove Press Announces Sponsorship of Nanomedicine Academy of Minority Serving Institutions at Northeastern … – PR Web (press release)

§ March 15th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Dove Press Announces Sponsorship of Nanomedicine Academy of Minority Serving Institutions at Northeastern … – PR Web (press release)

(PRWEB) March 14, 2017

For those unfamiliar with this emerging specialty area of medicine, nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology — science at the molecular level — to medicine. It seeks to develop new and improved techniques for the screening, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.

Dove Press is the publisher of the International Journal of Nanomedicine, an international, Open Access, peer-reviewed journal focusing on the application of nanotechnology in diagnostics, therapeutics, and drug delivery systems throughout the biomedical field. Reflecting the growing activity in this emerging specialty, the aim of this journal is to highlight research and development leading to potential clinical applications in the prevention and treatment of disease.

In the nanotechnology/nanomedicine field, there are many, many exciting examples from really all over the world of whats going on… But theres also equally as exciting, I think, research going into fighting cancer, explains the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Nanomedicine and Department Chair of Chemical Engineering at Northeastern University, Dr. Thomas Webster, [i]n our journal, for example, we recently published a paper from Jennifer Wests research group, formerly at Rice University, which is in Houston, Texas, and theyve pioneered the use of tiny nanoparticles that can be injected into tumors, can heat up and can kill, selectively, cancer cells. So they leave the healthy cells alone and they only kill cancer cells.

The Nanomedicine Academy (pioneered by Drs. Sri Sridhar and Thomas Webster of Northeastern University) is actively training scientists and engineers how to apply nanoscience and nanotechnology to problems in medicine, translate discoveries from the bench to bedside, negotiate ethical and socio-economic challenges of nanomedicine accessibility, and eliminate disparities in the healthcare workforce.

The Academy is dedicated to attracting students from racially and ethnically diverse populations, creating an interdisciplinary learning environment suitable for a diverse student body, and piloting new strategies for student learning and collaboration. The unique model of partnership allows the Academy to not only recruit and educate students from diverse backgrounds, but to bring geographically distant students together in new ways so that they can learn and benefit from each others diversity. Nanomedicine is an excellent subject, with real life consequences and examples, to get kids excited about science and engineering, explains Webster.

This pilot program builds upon education and training initiatives pioneered by Sridhar at Northeastern University, including the IGERT Nanomedicine Program and the CaNCURE Cancer Nanomedicine Co-op Program, with support from the National Science Foundation, DovePress, and Northeastern University. Assistance from DovePress has also allowed for Nanomedicine certificate and degree opportunities at Northeastern.

Our sponsorship of the Northeastern University Nanomedicine Academy reflects our ongoing commitment to diversity, as well as promoting the open access publishing model and the scholarly publishing landscape. explains Tim Hill, Publisher, Dove Medical Press.

About Dove Medical Press, Ltd.

Dove Medical Press Ltd is a privately held company specializing in the publication of Open Access peer-reviewed journals across the broad spectrum of science, technology and especially medicine.

Dove Press was founded in 2003 with the objective of combining the highest editorial standards with the ‘best of breed’ new publishing technologies. Dove Press has offices in Manchester and London in the United Kingdom, representatives in Princeton, New Jersey in the United States, and editorial offices in Auckland, New Zealand. For more information, visit: http://www.dovepress.com/

Share article on social media or email:

More:
Dove Press Announces Sponsorship of Nanomedicine Academy of Minority Serving Institutions at Northeastern … – PR Web (press release)

Read the Rest...

Nanomedicine Academy – northeastern.edu

§ March 9th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Nanomedicine Academy – northeastern.edu

A one-of-a-kind academic partnership dedicated to providing interdisciplinary education in nanomedicine, with an emphasis on broadening diversity and participation

The Nanomedicine Academy of Minority Serving Institutions is a collaborative model of higher education that provides state-of-the-art knowledge to under-served minority populations.

This multi-institutional partnership is actively training scientists and engineers how to apply nanoscience and nanotechnology to problems in medicine, translate discoveries from the bench to bedside, negotiate ethical and socio-economic challenges of nanomedicine accessibility, and eliminate disparities in the healthcare workforce.

The Nanomedicine Academy is dedicated to attracting students from racially and ethnically diverse populations, creating a interdisciplinary learning environment suitable for a diverse student body, and piloting new strategies for student learning & collaboration. Our unique model of partnership allows us to not only recruit and educate students from diverse backgrounds, but to bring geographically distant students together in new ways so that they can learn and benefit from each others diversity.

We have created 4 graduate courses in nanomedicine that are taught simultaneously to students at 5 partner institutions and established a cross-institutional online network that enables students to learn from expert instructors as well as peers throughout the nation.

Graduate students at our partner institutions enroll in courses through their home registrar and receive course credit toward their graduate degree program. Participation in the Academy provides students with enhanced access to specialized knowledge, hands-on training in essential tools and techniques, and opportunities for collaboration with students across institutions.

This pilot program builds upon education and training initiatives pioneered at Northeastern University, including the IGERT Nanomedicine Program and the CaNCURE Cancer Nanomedicine Co-op Program, with support from the National Science Foundation, DovePress, and Northeastern University.

Follow this link:
Nanomedicine Academy – northeastern.edu

Read the Rest...

Nanomedicine scientist to join USC faculty – Daily Trojan Online

§ March 9th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Nanomedicine scientist to join USC faculty – Daily Trojan Online

Mark Davis, a chemical engineering professor and nanomedicine researcher at the California Institute of Technology, will be joining the USC faculty in the fall, according to USC News.

Davis will serve as provost professor in the Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering in the Viterbi School of Engineering, and will also have joint appointments in the Department of Preventive Medicine and the Department of Chemistry.

Davis will also be a strategic advisor to the deans of both Viterbi and Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, and will continue his research on nanomedicine, specifically on nanoparticles that would be able to deliver medicine to the brain.

Mark Davis is a stellar addition to our faculty, Provost Michael Quick said to USC News. His multidisciplinary scholarship and research is an asset to the USC Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience, where we are building bridges across our campus to transform medicine and science.

Davis previously conducted his research at CalTech and at Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University. He has been recognized by the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine. He is also the author of more than 425 scientific publications, and two textbooks and holds 75 U.S. patents.

Davis specializes in materials synthesis, such as zeolites that can be used for molecular recognition, and polymers that can be used for therapeutic delivery.

At USC, he will continue his nanomedicine research on treatment for cancer.

Read the original here:
Nanomedicine scientist to join USC faculty – Daily Trojan Online

Read the Rest...

Nanomedicine: A Vast Horizon on a Molecular Landscape – Part VIII, Magnetic Nanoparticles theranostics – Lexology (registration)

§ March 9th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Nanomedicine: A Vast Horizon on a Molecular Landscape – Part VIII, Magnetic Nanoparticles theranostics – Lexology (registration)

This is the eighth article in a review series on Nanomedicine. We started from reviewing the major research and entrepreneurial development of nanomedicine and the relevant patent landscape (Part I and Part II). The first topic we discussed was Organs-on-a-chip (Part III). Following that, we focused on nanotechnology in medical therapeutics. Nanoparticles have nanoscale dimensions and demonstrate unique chemical and physical properties from their bulk. This also gives them great advantages in drug delivery (Part IV), cancer therapeutics (Part V), and bio-imaging (Part VI). In the last installment, we reviewed one special type of nanoparticles: quantum dots, which are incredibly small semiconductor particles (Part VII). Here, we will review the theranostic applications and IP landscape of another special type of nanoparticles known as magnetic nanoparticles (MNP). As in the past, those patent documents cited in the article are summarized in the table at the end.

Magnetic Nanoparticles Magnetic nanoparticles, also known as superparamagnetic nanoparticles are small inorganic crystals about 5-20 nm in diameter. Two main classes of MNPs currently used for clinical imaging are ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and ultrasmall superparameganetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPION). MNPs are usually multilayer materials, which give them their various properties and functionalities for diagnosis and disease treatment. The structure of iron oxide nanoparticles has three main components: an iron oxide core as a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent, a biocompatible coating outside the core, and an outer therapeutic coating with specific ligands for biomarker targeting. See (US 8,945,628 by Dr. Ralph Weissleder at Massachusetts General Hospital and US 7,462,446 by Dr. Miqin Zhang at the University of Washington). This unique structure enables MNP accumulation in the sites of interest via biomarker targeting. It further allows the diagnosis of diseases, the evaluation of treatment efficacy, and the localized delivery of drugs and disease therapies. The integration of both diagnostic and therapeutic modalities into one single agent is called a theranostic agent. We will discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic properties of MNPs in cancer.

Magnetic Nanoparticles for Diagnosis In 2008, the International Agency for Research on Cancer reported that the total number of cancer case around the world doubled between 1975 and 2000, and that the number of cases are expected to triple by 2030. This means there will be 13-17 million cancer deaths annually by that time. The only chance for successful treatment of cancer is early cancer diagnosis, by identifying the cancer before the patient shows symptoms. Currently the standard cancer detection technology in the clinic is imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Dr. Ralph Weissleder at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) is a pioneer in the field of clinical imaging using advanced nanomaterials (US 6,615,063, US 8,569,078 and US 9,097,644). He predicted that high resolution molecular imaging technologies (including those utilizing nanoparticles) can screen tumor growth at very early stages.

Currently, there are two main nanoimaging technologies, fluorescence imaging and MRI. In fluorescence imaging, quantum dots can target malignant tissues and show strong localized signals (Part VI). Magnetic nanoparticles demonstrate advanced applications in MRI. MRI is a non-invasive medical imaging technology based on nuclear magnetic resonance. When the magnetic field around the nuclei varies, the nuclei relax their magnetic moment through spin-lattice relaxation and spin-spin relaxation. With the assistance of MRI contrast agents, the MRI captures the change of relaxation times of protons around tissues and forms the medical images. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are one of the currently used contrast agents for MRI. These particles can shorten the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 (brighter signal) and the spin-spin relaxation time T2 (darker signal), forming a sharper and brighter image. These particles can also be actively targeted or passively targeted to malignant sites to differentiate between normal and diseased tissues.

MNPs are the most advanced contrast labels currently being used in research and development for medical imaging. Dr. Shan Wangs group at Stanford University has developed superparameganetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and fluorescent tag conjugated SPIONs for biological molecular imaging (US 7,682,838 and US 8,722,017 ). Dr. Miqin Zhangs group at the University of Washington has developed MNPs with a Fe3O4 core and a mesoporous silica shell embedded with carbon dots and paclitaxel (a common anti-cancer drug), and covered by another layer of silica. These MNPs enable confocal and twophoton fluorescence imaging via carbon dots and MRI via magnetic Fe3O4. They also deliver the paclitaxel to cancer cells to kill them through combined photothermal and chemotherapy. Dr. Zhang also developed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) conjugated MNPs for imaging T cells and also chitosan-polyethylene oxide oligomer copolymer coated MNPs for brain tumor imaging and drug delivery (US 20160193369, US 20150320890, and US 20140286872). Dr. Koichiro Hayashi demonstrated the advantages of using SPIONs for cancer theranostics by combining MRI and magnetic hyperthermia treatment (WO/2012/026194). His team modified the SPION clusters with folic acid and polyethylene glycol (PEG) to promote the accumulation of clusters in tumors. Dr. Qun Zhao at the University of Georgia developed hyperthermia treatment of head and neck cancers in a mouse model via intratumor injection of SPIONs. Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIONs) having smaller size in diameter, resulting in longer circulation time. These particles can accumulate in the microvascularture before being endocytosed (i.e. removed) by macrophages. Therefore, these particles can be used for tumor-associated microvessel imaging. Dr. Edward Neuwelt reported clinical data with enhanced brain tumor imaging by USPIONs. Other groups from France and Switzerland also reported similar results.

Summary Magnetic nanoparticles are not only used as MRI contrast labels for medical imaging, but also used as therapeutic drug delivery carriers, as hyperthermia tools, and even as combined drug delivery and imaging agents for cancer therapy. In the next installment, we will discuss further details on the application of these particles in cancer therapeutics.

The General Hospital Corporation

Excerpt from:
Nanomedicine: A Vast Horizon on a Molecular Landscape – Part VIII, Magnetic Nanoparticles theranostics – Lexology (registration)

Read the Rest...

Renowned chemical engineer and nanomedicine pioneer joining USC – USC News

§ March 8th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Renowned chemical engineer and nanomedicine pioneer joining USC – USC News

Mark E. Davis, a renowned chemical engineering professor and nanomedicine pioneer at Caltech, will join the USC faculty in October. His work on biomaterials for cancer treatment holds great promise to make medicines more targeted and effective.

Davis, one of the few academics selected to the National Academy of Engineering (1997), the National Academy of Sciences (2006) and the National Academy of Medicine (2011), will hold a Provost Professor appointment at USC, with a primary academic home in the Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering. He will be based at the University Park Campus, the soon to open Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience and the Health Sciences Campus.

In addition to his USC Viterbi appointment, Davis also will hold joint appointments in the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, as well as the Department of Chemistry at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

Davis research efforts involve materials synthesis in two general areas: zeolites and other solids that can be used for molecular recognition and catalysis, and polymers for the delivery of a broad range of therapeutics. He also conducts pioneering work on engineering nanoparticles for cancer therapeutics.

During his time at Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University (Virginia Tech) from 1981 to 1991, Davis and his research team invented a number of new zeolites and molecular sieves. They were the first to report the synthesis of a molecular sieve with uniform pore sizes larger than 1 nanometer. In recognition of his work, Davis became the first engineer to receive the National Science Foundations Alan T. Waterman Award in 1990.

While at Caltech in 1995, Davis expanded the focus of his research to biomaterials for cancer research. He did so in response to his wifes long and painful but ultimately successful fight against breast cancer.

Davis and his team became the first researchers to successfully engineer nanoparticles made from polymeric materials specifically designed and created for human cancer therapeutics. To date, three different nanoparticles invented by his lab have gone to numerous human, cancer clinical trials that have been and are being conducted both in the United States and throughout the world.

At USC, Davis will continue his groundbreaking work on engineering nanoparticles that can deliver drugs to the brain, research that began in recent years and could improve the treatment of brain cancer, Parkinsons and Alzheimers diseases, among other conditions. At Caltech, he and his team discovered how to successfully design nanoparticles that safely cross the blood-brain barrier in rodent models. Their work continues on the pathway to clinical translation of these nanoparticles that, if successful, would be a major medical breakthrough.

Davis will also serve as a strategic adviser to the deans of USC Viterbi and USC Dornsife, and will mentor faculty and students on convergent bioscience and engineering. As part of his duties at the Keck School of Medicine, Davis will serve as co-director of the MD/PhD program.

The connection between engineering and medicine is really a focal point for me, Davis said. At USC, I will work on trying to be a conduit to help people do translational medicine, especially in the area of therapeutics.

Mark Davis is a stellar addition to our faculty, said Provost Michael Quick. His multidisciplinary scholarship and research is an asset to the USC Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience, where we are building bridges across our campus to transform medicine and science. I know he will help move us forward in these efforts. We are looking forward to his expertise and guidance.

USC Viterbi Dean Yannis C. Yortsos said: We are truly excited to have such a superb engineer and scientist as Mark Davis join USC. We are eagerly looking forward to his leadership in advancing the rapidly accelerating convergence between engineering and medicine.

Rohit Varma, dean of the Keck School and director of the USC Gayle and Edward Roski Eye Institute, added, We are delighted to welcome Mark to the Keck School family.

He will be a tremendous resource for our MD-PhD program. His visionary work that converges the disciplines of technology and health/medicine will inspire our students to innovate and create at the forefront of translational science.

USC Dornsife Dean Amber D. Miller said: USC Dornsife extends a warm welcome toProvost Professor Davis. We greatly benefit from his strong record of leadership, innovation and expertise in creating synergies across scientific fields.

Davis has written more than 425 scientific publications, two textbooks and holds 75 U.S. patents. He is a founding editor of CaTTech and a former associate editor of Chemistry of Materials and the AIChE Journal, published by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

Over the decades, Davis has won a raft of awards, including the Colburn and Professional Progress awards from the AIChE and the Somorjai, Ipatieff, Langmuir, Murphree and Gaden prizes from the American Chemical Society. In 2014, he received the Prince of Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Research from the King of Spain, and in 2015, he was elected to the National Academy of Inventors.

A scientist with an entrepreneurial bent, Davis founded Calando Pharmaceuticals Inc., a company that created the first RNAi therapeutic to reach the clinic for treating cancer, and Avidity Bioscience.

Apart from his scientific achievements, Davis attained All American Status for Masters Track and Field in the 400-, 200- and 100-meter dashes. In 2011, he won the 400-meter dash for men of age 55-59 at the Masters World Championship.

He holds three degrees from the University of Kentucky, all in chemical engineering.

More stories about: Biotech

The new method generates hydrogen and stores it efficiently, and without further polluting the environment.

Valery Fokin will join the schools top scientists as USC aims to be among the worlds top institutions for convergent biomedical research.

Lyssa Arudas childhood passion leads to active engagement at USC Viterbi.

Mark Thompson and Karl Christe are slated to accept American Chemical Society awards in 2015.

Read more from the original source:
Renowned chemical engineer and nanomedicine pioneer joining USC – USC News

Read the Rest...

PhD Research Fellow in Biophysics and Nanomedicine – Times Higher Education (THE)

§ March 4th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on PhD Research Fellow in Biophysics and Nanomedicine – Times Higher Education (THE)

A PhD research fellowship within the field of biophysics is available at the Department of Physics. The appointments have duration of 3 years with the possibility of until 1 year extension with 25% teaching duties in agreement with the department. Student should start mid-August 2017.

Information about the department The position is organized in the Department of Physics. Currently, there are 22 professors, 12 associate professors, 4 adjunct professors, 72 PhD research fellows and 15 postdoctoral positions appointed at the Department of Physics. Our research spans a broad spectrum of natural sciences and technology, which in turn allows us to offer an education providing a solid basis for future careers. Physics research is carried out in experimental as well as theoretical fields, often across conventional boundaries between disciplines. Research staff at the department makes a special effort to increase the awareness and understanding of the importance and impact of physics in our society. Further information about the department can be found at https://www.ntnu.edu/physics

Job description The PhD student will work on the project Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT) for improved treatment of cancer and brain diseases funded by the Research Council of Norway. This project is in collaboration with international universities and two companies Phoenix Solutions who developed a platform for ultrasound activated targeted drug delivery and Cristal therapeutics who developed a pioneering approach to transform drugs into tailor-made nanoparticles. A major challenge in cancer therapy is to obtain adequate delivery of the therapeutic agents to cancer cells, and limit the systemic exposure. The explored concepts utilize an acoustic activated cluster (microbubble/ microdroplet) system and nanoparticles to deliver a drug payload at the targeted pathology. The biodistribution of (novel) biologicals will be assessed using (fluorescence) microscopy other imaging modalities in healthy animals and disease models. In vivo MRI, ultrasound, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, ex vivo analyses, and histological examinations will be used to investigate the in vivo distribution and behavior of the nanoparticles.

The project involves studies in cell cultures and preclinical testing in mice, which require designing and building various experimental setups for ultrasound exposure and imaging. The student should have broad experimental experience especially with imaging techniques like confocal laser scan microscopy (CLSM) or multi photon microscopy (MPM). Knowledge of image analysis methods would be considered an asset. It is essential that the student is willing to work with laboratory animals and thus willing to obtain the FELASA license. Furthermore, it is crucial to be able to travel to workshops and for research collaboration in other EU countries as well as the USA with notice.

Qualifications The student should hold very good grades and a Master of Science in biophysics, bio (nano)technology, biomedical sciences, or related sciences.

The regulations for PhD programs at NTNU state that the applicant must have a master’s degree or equivalent with at least 5 years of studies and an average grade of A or B within a scale of A-E for passing grades (A best). Candidates from universities outside Norway are kindly requested to send a Diploma Supplement or a similar document, which describes in detail the study and grade system and the rights for further studies associated with the obtained degree: http://ec.europa.eu/education/tools/diploma-supplement_en.htm

The position requires spoken and written fluency in the English language. Such evidence might be represented by the results of standard tests such as TOEFL, IELTS, Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) or Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE). The candidate’s language skills might also be assessed in a personal interview.

For more information about the research activities see http://www.ntnu.edu/physics/biophysmedtech/ultrasound

Terms of employment The appointment of the PhD fellows will be made according to Norwegian guidelines for universities and university colleges and to the general regulations regarding university employees. Applicants must agree to participate in organized doctoral study programs within the period of the appointment and have to be qualified for the PhD-study.

NTNUs personnel policy objective is that the staff must reflect the composition of the population to the greatest possible extent.

The position as PhD is remunerated according to the Norwegian State salary scale. There is a 2% deduction for superannuation contribution.

It is expected that the candidate can start in the position within August 2017 (but preferably not later). Further information can be obtained from Professor Catharina Davies, Department of Physics, NTNU, Phone: +47 73593688, e-mail: catharina.davies@ntnu.no or Dr. Annemieke van Wamel, Phone: +47 73593432, e-mail: annemieke.wamel@ntnu.no.

The application The application should contain: -CV -Reference letters -Certificates from Bachelor and Master degrees -List of publications or other scientific work, if any -Statement on research interest (maximum one page) -Documentation of English language proficiency (e.g. TOEFL, IELTS, etc.) if English or a Scandinavian language is not the applicant’s mother tongue

Applications must be submitted electronically through this site. Applications submitted elsewhere will not be considered.

The reference number of the position is: NV-40/17

Application deadline: April 6th 2017.

About this job

About applications

Read the original:
PhD Research Fellow in Biophysics and Nanomedicine – Times Higher Education (THE)

Read the Rest...

Nanomedicine provides HIV treatment alternative – Healio

§ March 2nd, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nanomedicine provides HIV treatment alternative – Healio

Nanomedicine provides HIV treatment alternative
Healio
The results of two trials, which examined the use of nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients, found that a new nanomedicine method has the potential to cut the dose of leading HIV treatment in half, according to new evidence presented

Link:
Nanomedicine provides HIV treatment alternative – Healio

Read the Rest...

New Nano Approach Could Cut Dose of Leading HIV Treatment in … – Infection Control Today

§ February 27th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on New Nano Approach Could Cut Dose of Leading HIV Treatment in … – Infection Control Today

Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilized nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice and progress.

The healthy volunteer trial, conducted by the collaborative nanomedicine research program led by pharmacologist Andrew Owen and materials chemist Steve Rannard, and in collaboration with the St Stephen’s AIDS Trust at the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital in London, examined the use of nanotechnology to improve the delivery of drugs to HIV patients. The results were from two trials which are the first to use orally dosed nanomedicine to enable HIV therapy optimization.

Nanotechnology is the manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to the prevention and treatment of disease in the human body. By developing smaller pills that are better for patients and less expensive to manufacture, this evolving discipline has the potential to dramatically change medical science and is already having an impact in a number of clinically used therapies and diagnostics worldwide.

Currently, the treatment of HIV requires daily oral dosing of HIV drugs, and chronic oral dosing has significant complications that arise from the high pill burden experienced by many patients across populations with varying conditions leading to non-adherence to therapies.

Recent evaluation of HIV patient groups have shown a willingness to switch to nanomedicine alternatives if benefits can be shown. Research efforts by the Liverpool team have focused on the development of new oral therapies, using Solid Drug Nanoparticle (SDN) technology which can improve drug absorption into the body, reducing both the dose and the cost per dose and enabling existing healthcare budgets to treat more patients.

The trial results confirmed the potential for a 50 percent dose reduction while maintaining therapeutic exposure, using a novel approach to formulation of two drugs: efavirenz (EFV) and, lopinavir (LPV). EFV is the current WHO-recommended preferred regimen, with 70% of adult patients on first-line taking an EFV-based HIV treatment regimen in low- and middle-income countries.

The trial is connected to the University’s ongoing work as part of the multinational consortium OPTIMIZE, a global partnership working to accelerate access to simpler, safer and more affordable HIV treatment. Funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, OPTIMIZE is led by the Wits Reproductive Health & HIV Institute in Johannesburg, South Africa, and includes the interdisciplinary Liverpool team, Columbia University, Mylan Laboratories and the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP). OPTIMIZE is supported by key partners including UNITAID and the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC)

Benny Kottiri, USAID’s Office of HIV/AIDS Research Division Chief, said: “The potential applications for HIV treatment are incredibly promising. By aligning efforts, these integrated investments offer the potential to reduce the doses required to control the HIV virus even further, resulting in real benefits globally. This would enable the costs of therapy to be reduced which is particularly beneficial for resource-limited countries where the burden of disease is highest.”

Source: University of Liverpool

Read more from the original source:
New Nano Approach Could Cut Dose of Leading HIV Treatment in … – Infection Control Today

Read the Rest...

New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half – Science Daily

§ February 24th, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half – Science Daily

Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilised nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice and progress.

The healthy volunteer trial, conducted by the collaborative nanomedicine research programme led by Pharmacologist Professor Andrew Owen and Materials Chemist Professor Steve Rannard, and in collaboration with the St Stephen’s AIDS Trust at the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital in London, examined the use of nanotechnology to improve the delivery of drugs to HIV patients. The results were from two trials which are the first to use orally dosed nanomedicine to enable HIV therapy optimisation.

Manipulation of matter

Nanotechnology is the manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to the prevention and treatment of disease in the human body. By developing smaller pills that are better for patients and less expensive to manufacture, this evolving discipline has the potential to dramatically change medical science and is already having an impact in a number of clinically used therapies and diagnostics worldwide.

Currently, the treatment of HIV requires daily oral dosing of HIV drugs, and chronic oral dosing has significant complications that arise from the high pill burden experienced by many patients across populations with varying conditions leading to non-adherence to therapies.

Developing new therapies

Recent evaluation of HIV patient groups have shown a willingness to switch to nanomedicine alternatives if benefits can be shown. Research efforts by the Liverpool team have focused on the development of new oral therapies, using Solid Drug Nanoparticle (SDN) technology which can improve drug absorption into the body, reducing both the dose and the cost per dose and enabling existing healthcare budgets to treat more patients.

The trial results confirmed the potential for a 50 percent dose reduction while maintaining therapeutic exposure, using a novel approach to formulation of two drugs: efavirenz (EFV) and, lopinavir (LPV). EFV is the current WHO-recommended preferred regimen, with 70% of adult patients on first-line taking an EFV-based HIV treatment regimen in low- and middle-income countries.

The trial is connected to the University’s ongoing work as part of the multinational consortium OPTIMIZE, a global partnership working to accelerate access to simpler, safer and more affordable HIV treatment. Funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, OPTIMIZE is led by the Wits Reproductive Health & HIV Institute in Johannesburg, South Africa, and includes the interdisciplinary Liverpool team, Columbia University, Mylan Laboratories and the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP). OPTIMIZE is supported by key partners including UNITAID and the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC).

Potential applications

Benny Kottiri, USAID’s Office of HIV/AIDS Research Division Chief, said: “The potential applications for HIV treatment are incredibly promising. By aligning efforts, these integrated investments offer the potential to reduce the doses required to control the HIV virus even further, resulting in real benefits globally. This would enable the costs of therapy to be reduced which is particularly beneficial for resource-limited countries where the burden of disease is highest.”

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Liverpool. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

See the original post here:
New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half – Science Daily

Read the Rest...

New Technique Cuts HIV Treatment in Half – Controlled Environments Magazine

§ February 23rd, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on New Technique Cuts HIV Treatment in Half – Controlled Environments Magazine

Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilized nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice, and progress.

The healthy volunteer trial, conducted by the collaborative nanomedicine research program led by Pharmacologist Professor Andrew Owen and Materials Chemist Professor Steve Rannard, and in collaboration with the St Stephens AIDS Trust at the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital in London, examined the use of nanotechnology to improve the delivery of drugs to HIV patients. The results were from two trials which are the first to use orally dosed nanomedicine to enable HIV therapy optimization.

Nanotechnology is the manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to the prevention and treatment of disease in the human body. By developing smaller pills that are better for patients and less expensive to manufacture, this evolving discipline has the potential to dramatically change medical science and is already having an impact in a number of clinically used therapies and diagnostics worldwide.

Currently, the treatment of HIV requires daily oral dosing of HIV drugs, and chronic oral dosing has significant complications that arise from the high pill burden experienced by many patients across populations with varying conditions leading to non-adherence to therapies.

Recent evaluation of HIV patient groups has shown a willingness to switch to nanomedicine alternatives if benefits can be shown. Research efforts by the Liverpool team have focused on the development of new oral therapies, using Solid Drug Nanoparticle (SDN) technology which can improve drug absorption into the body, reducing both the dose and the cost per dose and enabling existing healthcare budgets to treat more patients.

The trial results confirmed the potential for a 50 percent dose reduction while maintaining therapeutic exposure, using a novel approach to formulation of two drugs: efavirenz (EFV) and, lopinavir (LPV). EFV is the current WHO-recommended preferred regimen, with 70 percent of adult patients on first-line taking an EFV-based HIV treatment regimen in low- and middle-income countries.

The trial is connected to the Universitys ongoing work as part of the multinational consortium OPTIMIZE, a global partnership working to accelerate access to simpler, safer and more affordable HIV treatment. Funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, OPTIMIZE is led by the Wits Reproductive Health & HIV Institute in Johannesburg, South Africa, and includes the interdisciplinary Liverpool team, Columbia University, Mylan Laboratories, and the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP). OPTIMIZE is supported by key partners including UNITAID and the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC).

Benny Kottiri, USAIDs Office of HIV/AIDS Research Division Chief, says, The potential applications for HIV treatment are incredibly promising. By aligning efforts, these integrated investments offer the potential to reduce the doses required to control the HIV virus even further, resulting in real benefits globally. This would enable the costs of therapy to be reduced which is particularly beneficial for resource-limited countries where the burden of disease is highest.

Source: University of Liverpool

Here is the original post:
New Technique Cuts HIV Treatment in Half – Controlled Environments Magazine

Read the Rest...

Rayat Bahra University inks pact with Deakin Varsity – Punjab News Express

§ February 21st, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Rayat Bahra University inks pact with Deakin Varsity – Punjab News Express

Punjab News Express MOHALI: The Rayat Bahra University here today signed a memorandum of understanding with the Deakin University of Australia to facilitate education and research between the students of the two universities. Under the agreement the Rayat Bahra University would start Medical/Paramedical health care programme for undergraduates, post graduates leading in MBA (Health Management), M Phil and PhD programmes on its campus. Gurvinder Singh Bahra, Chancellor of the Rayat Bahra University and Chairman of the Rayat Bahra Group of Institutions (RBGI), was present at the signing ceremony of the Memorandum of Understanding. He said that the long cherished dream of the Rayat Bahra University had been realized today with the inking of this pact with the Deakin University. He said the university is proud to be associated with this top Australian university. Prof Jon Watson, Dean and Head of School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, and Dr Raj Singh, Vice-Chancellor of the RBU, speaking on the occasion encouraged students to take up research programmes and doctorate course under this collaboration. Commencing at the Rayat Bahra University campus the programme would conclude with the students doing one semester at the Deakin University campus in Australia. With other incentives to deserving candidates, the Rayat Bahra University and Deakin University together are keen to nurture talent and bigger breakthroughs, they said. The Deakin University delegation comprised of Prof Jon Watson, Dean and Head of School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, Prof Alister Ward, Professor/Director of Pre-Clinical Studies, Associate Head of School (Research), Director Centre for Molecular and Medical Research, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, Prof Jagat Kanwar, Professor in Nano Medicine, School of Medicine (SoM), Centre for Molecular and Medical Research (C-MMR), Faculty of Health, and Dr Rupinder Kanwar, Senior Lecturer in Biomedicine (School of Medicine (SoM), Centre for Molecular and Medical Research (C-MMR), Faculty of Health. The Rayat Bahra team present at the MoU signing ceremony included Dr Sandeep Kaura, Joint Managing Director of the RBU, Dr OP Midha, Registrar of the RBU, besides various deans and directors from the RBU. The Deakin University delegates visited the Skill Development Centre of the Rayat Bahra Group and the Rayat Bahra Dental College and Hospital and appreciated the elaborate infrastructure available there.

Read more:
Rayat Bahra University inks pact with Deakin Varsity – Punjab News Express

Read the Rest...

Nominations invited for $250,000 Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience and … – Northwestern University NewsCenter

§ February 21st, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nominations invited for $250,000 Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience and … – Northwestern University NewsCenter

EVANSTON – Northwestern Universitys International Institute for Nanotechnology (IIN) is now accepting nominations for two prestigious international prizes: the $250,000 Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience and Nanomedicine and the $10,000 Kabiller Young Investigator Award in Nanoscience and Nanomedicine.

The deadline for nominations is May 15, 2017. Details are available on the IIN website.

Our goal is to recognize the outstanding accomplishments in nanoscience and nanomedicine that have the potential to benefit all humankind, said David G. Kabiller, a Northwestern trustee and alumnus. He is a co-founder of AQR Capital Management, a global investment management firm in Greenwich, Connecticut.

The two prizes, awarded every other year, were established in 2015 through a generous gift from Kabiller. Current Northwestern-affiliated researchers are not eligible for nomination until 2018 for the 2019 prizes.

The Kabiller Prize the largest monetary award in the world for outstanding achievement in the field of nanomedicine celebrates researchers who have made the most significant contributions to the field of nanotechnology and its application to medicine and biology.

The Kabiller Young Investigator Award recognizes young emerging researchers who have made recent groundbreaking discoveries with the potential to make a lasting impact in nanoscience and nanomedicine.

The IIN at Northwestern University is a hub of excellence in the field of nanotechnology, said Kabiller, chair of the IIN executive council and a graduate of Northwesterns Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences and Kellogg School of Management. As such, it is the ideal organization from which to launch these awards recognizing outstanding achievements that have the potential to substantially benefit society.

Nanoparticles for medical use are typically no larger than 100 nanometers comparable in size to the molecules in the body. At this scale, the essential properties (e.g., color, melting point, conductivity, etc.) of structures behave uniquely. Researchers are capitalizing on these unique properties in their quest to realize life-changing advances in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease.

Nanotechnology is one of the key areas of distinction at Northwestern, said Chad A. Mirkin, IIN director and George B. Rathmann Professor of Chemistry in Weinberg. We are very grateful for Davids ongoing support and are honored to be stewards of these prestigious awards.

An international committee of experts in the field will select the winners of the 2017 Kabiller Prize and the 2017 Kabiller Young Investigator Award and announce them in September.

The recipients will be honored at an awards banquet Sept. 27 in Chicago. They also will be recognized at the 2017 IIN Symposium, which will include talks from prestigious speakers, including 2016 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry Ben Feringa, from the University of Groningen, the Netherlands.

The winner of the inaugural Kabiller Prize, in 2015, was Joseph DeSimone the Chancellors Eminent Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the William R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University and of Chemistry at UNC-Chapel Hill.

DeSimone was honored for his invention of particle replication in non-wetting templates (PRINT) technology that enables the fabrication of precisely defined, shape-specific nanoparticles for advances in disease treatment and prevention. Nanoparticles made with PRINT technology are being used to develop new cancer treatments, inhalable therapeutics for treating pulmonary diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and asthma, and next-generation vaccines for malaria, pneumonia and dengue.

Warren Chan, professor at the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Toronto, was the recipient of the inaugural Kabiller Young Investigator Award, also in 2015. Chan and his research group have developed an infectious disease diagnostic device for a point-of-care use that can differentiate symptoms.

In total, the IIN represents and unites more than $1 billion in nanotechnology infrastructure, research and education. These efforts, plus those of many other groups, have helped transition nanomedicine from a laboratory curiosity to life-changing technologies that are positively impacting the world.

The IIN houses numerous centers and institutes, including the Ronald and JoAnne Willens Center for Nano Oncology, an NIH Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, an Air Force Center of Excellence for Advanced Bioprogrammable Nanomaterials, and the Convergence Science & Medicine Institute.

View post:
Nominations invited for $250,000 Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience and … – Northwestern University NewsCenter

Read the Rest...

New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half – Phys.Org

§ February 21st, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half – Phys.Org

February 21, 2017 Credit: University of Liverpool

Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilised nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice and progress.

The healthy volunteer trial, conducted by the collaborative nanomedicine research programme led by Pharmacologist Professor Andrew Owen and Materials Chemist Professor Steve Rannard, and in collaboration with the St Stephen’s AIDS Trust at the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital in London, examined the use of nanotechnology to improve the delivery of drugs to HIV patients. The results were from two trials which are the first to use orally dosed nanomedicine to enable HIV therapy optimisation.

Manipulation of matter

Nanotechnology is the manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to the prevention and treatment of disease in the human body. By developing smaller pills that are better for patients and less expensive to manufacture, this evolving discipline has the potential to dramatically change medical science and is already having an impact in a number of clinically used therapies and diagnostics worldwide.

Currently, the treatment of HIV requires daily oral dosing of HIV drugs, and chronic oral dosing has significant complications that arise from the high pill burden experienced by many patients across populations with varying conditions leading to non-adherence to therapies.

Developing new therapies

Recent evaluation of HIV patient groups have shown a willingness to switch to nanomedicine alternatives if benefits can be shown. Research efforts by the Liverpool team have focused on the development of new oral therapies, using Solid Drug Nanoparticle (SDN) technology which can improve drug absorption into the body, reducing both the dose and the cost per dose and enabling existing healthcare budgets to treat more patients.

The trial results confirmed the potential for a 50 percent dose reduction while maintaining therapeutic exposure, using a novel approach to formulation of two drugs: efavirenz (EFV) and, lopinavir (LPV). EFV is the current WHO-recommended preferred regimen, with 70% of adult patients on first-line taking an EFV-based HIV treatment regimen in low- and middle-income countries.

The trial is connected to the University’s ongoing work as part of the multinational consortium OPTIMIZE, a global partnership working to accelerate access to simpler, safer and more affordable HIV treatment. Funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, OPTIMIZE is led by the Wits Reproductive Health & HIV Institute in Johannesburg, South Africa, and includes the interdisciplinary Liverpool team, Columbia University, Mylan Laboratories and the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP). OPTIMIZE is supported by key partners including UNITAID and the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC).

Potential applications

Benny Kottiri, USAID’s Office of HIV/AIDS Research Division Chief, said: “The potential applications for HIV treatment are incredibly promising. By aligning efforts, these integrated investments offer the potential to reduce the doses required to control the HIV virus even further, resulting in real benefits globally. This would enable the costs of therapy to be reduced which is particularly beneficial for resource-limited countries where the burden of disease is highest.”

Explore further: New nanomedicine approach aims to improve HIV drug therapies

More information: The presentation is available online: http://www.croiwebcasts.org/console/player/33376?mediaType=slideVideo&

As devices become smaller and more powerful, they require faster, smaller, more stable batteries. University of Illinois chemists have developed a superionic solid that could be the basis of next-generation lithium-ion batteries.

Cells within our bodies divide and change over time, with thousands of chemical reactions occurring within each cell daily. This makes it difficult for scientists to understand what’s happening inside. Now, tiny nanostraws …

DNA, the stuff of life, may very well also pack quite the jolt for engineers trying to advance the development of tiny, low-cost electronic devices.

Drugs disguised as viruses are providing new weapons in the battle against cancer, promising greater accuracy and fewer side effects than chemotherapy.

The precise control of electron transport in microelectronics makes complex logic circuits possible that are in daily use in smartphones and laptops. Heat transport is of similar fundamental importance and its control is …

A new technique using liquid metals to create integrated circuits that are just atoms thick could lead to the next big advance for electronics.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Read the rest here:
New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half – Phys.Org

Read the Rest...

Nanomedical Devices Industry Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast 2027 – Satellite PR News (press release)

§ February 21st, 2017 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nanomedical Devices Industry Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast 2027 – Satellite PR News (press release)

Submit the press release

Nanomedical Devices Industry Size, Application Analysis, Regional Outlook, Competitive Strategies and Forecast to 2027

Market Research Future

PUNE, MAHARASHTRA, INDIA, February 14, 2017 /EINPresswire.com/ Market Highlights Till now, around 250 nanomedicine products are being tested or used in humans. According to experts, the long-term impact of nanomedicinal products on human health and the environment is still not certain. During the last 10 years, there has been steep growth in development of devices that integrate nanomaterials or other nanotechnology. Enhancement of in vivo imaging and testing has been a highly popular area of research, followed by bone substitutes and coatings for implanted devices. The market for Nano-Medical Devices is booming.

Ask for your specific company profile and country level customization on report. Request a Sample Report @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/sample_request/1236

Segmentation Global Nano-Medical Devices Market has been segmented on the basis of types which comprises of Implantable Biosensors, Implantable cardioverter-Defibrillators (ICD), Implantable drug delivery system and others. On the basis of applications, the market is segmented into Disease indication, Drug release regulation, controlling fast or irregular heartbeat, consistent drug delivery and others. On the basis of end users, market is segmented into Hospitals, clinics, research institutes and others.

Key Players Stryker Corporation (U.S.) Medtronic (Ire) 3M Company (U.S.) St. Jude Medical, Inc. (U.S.) PerkinElmer, Inc. (U.S.) Starkey Hearing Technologies Smith & Nephew plc.

Regional Analysis of Nano-Medical devices Market: Globally North America is the largest market for Nano medical devices. The North American market for nanomedical devices is expected to grow at a CAGR of XX% and is expected to reach at US$ XXX Million by the end of the forecasted period. Europe is the second-largest market for Nano-Medical Devices which is expected to grow at a CAGR of XX%. Asia is the fastest growing market in the segment.

Taste the market data and market information presented through more than 85 market data tables and figures spread in 130 numbers of pages of the project report. Avail the in-depth table of content TOC & market synopsis on Global Nanomedical Devices Market Research Report- Forecast To 2027

Brief TOC of Global Nano-Medical Devices Market 1 Executive Summary 2 Scope of the Report 2.1 Market Definition 2.2 Scope of the Study 2.3 Markets Structure

3 Market Research Methodology 3.1 Research Process 3.2 Secondary Research 3.3 Primary Research 3.4 Forecast Model

4 Market Landscape 5 Industry Overview of Global Nano-Medical Devices Market 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Growth Drivers 5.3 Impact analysis 5.4 Market Challenges Continued.

Browse full Nano-Medical Devices Market @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/nanomedical-devices-market

Study Objectives of Nanomedical devices Market: To provide detailed analysis of the market structure along with forecast for the next 10 years of the various segments and sub-segments of the nanomedical devices Market To provide insights about factors affecting the market growth To analyze the nanomedical devices Market based on various factors- price analysis, supply chain analysis, porters five force analysis etc. To provide historical and forecast revenue of the market segments and sub-segments with respect to four main geographies and their countries- Americas, Europe, Asia, and Rest of World. To provide country level analysis of the market with respect to the current market size and future prospective To provide country level analysis of the market for segments by types, by applications, by end users and sub-segments. To provide overview of key players and their strategic profiling in the market, comprehensively analyzing their core competencies, and drawing a competitive landscape for the market

About Market Research Future: At Market Research Future (MRFR), we enable our customers to unravel the complexity of various industries through our Cooked Research Report (CRR), Half-Cooked Research Reports (HCRR), Raw Research Reports (3R), Continuous-Feed Research (CFR), and Market Research & Consulting Services.

Contact: Akash Anand Market Research Future Magarpatta Road, Hadapsar, Pune 411028 Maharashtra, India +1 646 845 9312 Email: akash.anand@marketresearchfuture.com

Akash Anand Market Research Future +1 646 845 9312 email us here

Read more:
Nanomedical Devices Industry Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast 2027 – Satellite PR News (press release)

Read the Rest...

« Older Entries





Page 11234..1020..»