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Nanotechnology News — ScienceDaily

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nanotechnology News — ScienceDaily

Feb. 29, 2016 Physicists have discovered a new material that could advance digital technology and open a new frontier in 2-D materials beyond graphene. Truly flat and extremely stable, the material is made up of … read more Preventing Protein Unfolding Feb. 26, 2016 A computational model shows that polymers can reinforce proteins to prevent them from unfolding under mechanical … read more Feb. 26, 2016 New research has shown how graphene can be manipulated to create the most light-absorbent material for its weight, to … read more Feb. 25, 2016 Graphene, a modified form of carbon, offers versatile potential for use in coating machine components and in the field of electronic switches. Physicists have been studying the lubricity of this … read more Feb. 25, 2016 For the first time, researchers have experimentally demonstrated that copper nanophotonic components can operate successfully in photonic devices — it was previously believed that only gold and … read more Feb. 25, 2016 Just as the single-crystal silicon wafer forever changed the nature of communication 60 years ago, a group of researchers is hoping its work with quantum dot solids — crystals made out of crystals … read more Fine-Grained Memory Loss Feb. 28, 2016 The ability of shape memory alloys, used as materials for medical stents, to revert to their original shape after an increase in temperature is suppressed at nanometer grain sizes due to effects … read more Immune Cells Don’t Always Ward Off Carbon Nano Invaders Feb. 24, 2016 Scientists have found evidence that some carbon nanomaterials can enter into immune cell membranes, seemingly going undetected by the cell’s built-in mechanisms for engulfing and disposing of … read more New Therapeutic Pathway May Keep Cancer Cells Turned ‘Off’ Feb. 23, 2016 A new study offers tangible evidence that it is possible to keep osteosarcoma lesions dormant using novel nanomedicines. Osteosarcoma is a cancer that develops in the bones of children and … read more Nano Dangerously Big Feb. 23, 2016 Keywords such as nano-, personalized-, or targeted medicine sound like bright future. What most people do not know, is that nanomedicines can cause severe undesired effects for actually being too … read more Feb. 22, 2016 A portable and low-cost diagnostic device has been developed. This microfluidic tool, which has been tested with Ebola, requires no bulky equipment, and is thus ideally suited for use in remote … read more Feb. 19, 2016 The use of the world’s first ultrafast optical microscope allows researchers to probe and visualize matter at the atomic level with mind-bending … read more Feb. 19, 2016 Over the last decade, one researcher has spent his time figuring out how to deliver chemotherapy drugs into cancerous tumors — and nowhere else. Now his lab has designed a set of nanoparticles … read more Feb. 19, 2016 A stretchable nano-scale device has been created to manipulate light. Using the technology, high-tech lenses could one day filter harmful optical radiation without interfering with vision — or in a … read more New Nanoparticle With Potential to Treat Ocular Cancer Developed Feb. 18, 2016 Researchers are using nanoparticles to kill tumor cells inside the eye. This nanotechnology also has the potential to be used for multiple applications in ophthalmology and other disciplines, they … read more Hot Find: Tightly Spaced Objects Could Exchange Millions of Times More Heat Feb. 18, 2016 Scientists have come up with a formula that describes the maximum heat transfer in such tight … read more Feb. 18, 2016 New research points to an entirely new approach for designing insulin-based pharmaceuticals. The approach could open the door for more personalized medications with fewer side effects for Type 1 … read more Feb. 17, 2016 New research has identified key factors in the structure of Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH), the main product of the hydration of Portland cement, that could help researchers work out better … read more Researchers Devise More Efficient Materials for Solar Fuel Cells Feb. 16, 2016 Chemists have developed new high-performing materials for cells that harness sunlight to split carbon dioxide and water into usable fuels like methanol and hydrogen gas. These ‘green fuels’ … read more Feb. 16, 2016 Graphene is a single-atomic carbon sheet with a hexagonal honeycomb network. Electrons in graphene take a special electronic state called Dirac-cone where they behave as if they have no mass. This … read more

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Nanotechnology News — ScienceDaily

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Sports Medicine Research Laboratory | Research …

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Sports Medicine Research Laboratory | Research …

The Sports Medicine Research Laboratory, led by principal investigator Dr. Martha M. Murray, focuses on sports medicine injuries, including those of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), knee meniscus and articular cartilage.

In conjunction with our collaborators, we are studying these problems on multiple levels: gene, protein, cell, tissue and organism.

Our research includes projects in:

Dr. Murray also specializes in the clinical care and surgical treatment of patients with knee injuries, including injuries of the ACL, meniscus, and cartilage. If you would like to schedule an appointment to see her, please call 617-355-3501.

Appointment scheduling

The FDA has approved a 20-patient, first-in-human safety trial of bio-enhanced ACL repair. The less invasive alternative to conventional ACL reconstruction uses a bio-engineered sponge as a bridge between the ends of the torn ACL to stimulate healing. Read more about the technique here.

ACL injuries affect the lives of hundreds of thousands of people each year. Treatment is far from perfect, and physicians and patients face challenges such as high failure rates in adolescent athletes and the inability to slow the accelerated progression of arthritis after an ACL rupture, for example.The ACL Handbooktakes a complete view of ACL injuries and treatments, discussing:

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Sports Medicine Research Laboratory | Research …

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Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine Society

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine Society

PRISMSPORTS.ORG

The purpose of PRISM is to foster and stimulate interdisciplinary professional education, research and interest in pediatric and adolescent sports medicine and, in this regard, to promote and participate in high-quality research and the advancement of understanding in the field of pediatric and adolescent sports medicine.

Be a part of a collective group of focused individuals that are united in the mission of PRISM. As the PRISM Society grows from its infancy phase, we invite you to take this journey with us and make this society a unique network of resources.

PRISM is not your traditional membership society. The whole reason for its existence is to join individuals together in order to service children and adolescents as an inter-professional team of experts in sports medicine. Through collaboration, members from multi-disciplines can share best practices and find new, less invasive treatments that make the road to recovery a blur of speed for all patients/clients.

PRISM has an all-encompassing annual meeting. Once the word spreads of the education and research being shared, many programs will be developed so specifically target our members needs. At this time, we will be offering CME for physicians and are looking to expand to offer continuing education credit in all the fields we represent.

PRISM has identified key areas to focus on research grant funding. The list below are specialty areas of research working groups. We will have updates on these areas in the upcoming months. Eventually, PRISM will be able to fund their own grants in these areas in order to develop and maintain evidence-based best practices.

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Sports Medicine Conferences | Sports Events | USA | Europe …

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Sports Medicine Conferences | Sports Events | USA | Europe …

OMICS International Conferences invites all the participants from all over the world to attend 2nd International Conference on Sports Medicine and Fitness, during April 18-20, 2016, Dubai, UAE which includes prompt keynote presentations, Oral talks, Poster presentations and Exhibitions.

Track 1:Sports Science: Physical Education

Physical activityis an essential part of a being health. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (PAG) recommends that adults get at least 2 hours of moderately to vigorously intense physical activity each week. Sports can give a big boost to the amount of physical activity in your life. Academic sports and physical training: The participation in organized sports offers the chance for youth people to enhance their physical and social skills. Physical training in young people High quality physical education can encourage young people to develop knowledge, understanding and skills across a range of physical education, sport and health enhancing experiences. Physical training in women and children Women of all ages can benefit from physical strength training. Studies have shown that even women who are 90 years old and use a walker can benefit from light strength training and also beneficial for children. Physical training in youth and elderly people older adults, both male and female, can benefit from regular physical activity. Physical activity need not be strenuous to achieve health benefits. A moderate amount of activity can be obtained in longer sessions of moderately intense activities.

Related Conferences: Weight Loss and Medicare Expo, September 19-21, 2016, Austria, 7th Euro Health Care and Fitness Summit, September 26-28, 2016, UK, Health Informatics and Technology, June 27-29, 2016, USA, 17th International Conference on Sport Science, October 8 – 9, 2015, USA, International Conference on Sport Science and Physical Education September 18-20 2015, China, International Society of Physical & Rehabilitation Medicine World Congress May 29 June 2, Malaysia, World Conference on Regenerative Medicine, 21st – 23rd October 2015, Germany, International Congress on Sport and Health, 2-3 October, 2015, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Track 2: Injuries and Orthopedic Treatments in Sports

Foot, ankle, hip, Knee, shoulder & neck injuries Sports injuries are injuries that happen when playing sports or exercising. Some are from accidents. Others can result from poor training practices or improper gear. The most common sports injuries are Sprains, strains, Foot, ankle, hip, Knee, shoulder & neck. Acute and chronic injuries There are two kinds of sports injuries: acute and chronic. Acute injuries occur suddenly when playing or exercising and the reason for the chronic injury could also be the same but the severity is more. We have many Injury Cause Symposiums and workshop. Emergency sports medicines a physician with special knowledge in sports medicine is responsible for continuous care in the field of sports medicine. These medicines are very much important for the athlete. Sports medicine is a subspecialty of emergency medicine, family practice, internal medicine, or pediatrics. Surgical and non-surgical treatments Non-Surgical Treatment Options: Surgery is not the appropriate or preferred treatment for some of the injuries. Physical therapy and non-surgical options can often get you back to a healthy, active lifestyle. Surgical Options: Surgery is required for few chronic sports injuries like more complex spinal procedures and total joint replacements.

Related conferences: 4th International Conference on Orthopedics & Rheumatology, October 26-28, 2015, USA, Global Summit and Medicare Expo on Head & Neck Surgery, November 30-December 01, 2015 Atlanta, Georgia, USA, International Conference on Epilepsy & Treatment, September 21-22, 2015 Baltimore, USA, 18th Annual Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Conference, February 5-6, 2016 Bloomington, MN, 32nd AGA Congress, September 17-19, 2015, Innovative Techniques: The Knee Course, September 17-19, 2015, USA, Linking orthopedics & radiology – The plain film & management revisited III: The spine, October 15th 2015, UK, MOC MENA Orthopaedics Congress 2015, October 15-17, 2015, Germany

Track 3:Exercise Physiology and Role of Hormones

Functioning of the body during exercise The body response to the exercise in such a way that there’s the red face and the sweating, the pounding heart and pumping lungs, the boost to your alertness and mood, the previously nonexistent urges to talk about nothing but splits and laps and PBs, Muscle Stretching Workshops. Role of hormones in muscular growth and fitness hormones play a vital role for the development of the body size shape and strength. GH, or the growth hormone is well helping to maintain an optimal ratio of lean muscle tissue to body fat. Its Very important to have good GH levels in order to live healthy, both mentally and of course, physically. Exercise physiology is the study of the acute responses and chronic adaptations to a wide range of physical exercise conditions. Kinetics during rest and exercise In addition, many exercise physiologists study the effect of exercise on pathology, kinetics during rest and exercise, and the mechanisms by which exercise can reduce or reverse disease progression

Related Conferences: International Conference on Anatomy and Physiology, August 11-13, 2016, UK, 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation August 25-27, 2016 Philadelphia, USA, 2nd International Conference and Expo on Novel Physiotherapies, June 9-11, 2016 UK, 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Pain Medicine May 16-18, 2016, USA, Asia Pacific Physical Education Conference, November 14-15, 2015, Hong Kong, International Schools Physical Education conferences, April 14-16, 2016, London, 18th International Conference on Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, August 4-6, 2016 Canada, 18th International Conference on Kinesiology, Exercise and Sport Sciences, August 22 – 23, 2016, France

Track 4:Orthopedic treatments

Orthopaedic surgery or orthopaedic treatments of simply orthopedics is the branch of surgery concerned with conditions involving the musculoskeletal system. Orthopaedic surgeons use both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors, and congenital disorders. Sports injuries are injuries that happen when playing sports or exercising. Some are from accidents. Others can result from poor training practices or improper gear. The most common sports injuries are Sprains, strains, Foot, ankle, hip, Knee, shoulder & neck. Acute and chronic injuries There are two kinds of sports injuries: acute and chronic. Acute injuries occur suddenly when playing or exercising and the reason for the chronic injury could also be the same but the severity is more. We have many Injury Cause Symposiums and workshop. Emergency sports medicines a physician with special knowledge in sports medicine is responsible for continuous care in the field of sports medicine. These medicines are very much important for the athlete. Sports medicine is a subspecialty of emergency medicine, family practice, internal medicine, or pediatrics. Surgical and non-surgical treatments Non-Surgical Treatment Options: Surgery is not the appropriate or preferred treatment for some of the injuries. Physical therapy and non-surgical options can often get you back to a healthy, active lifestyle. Surgical Options: Surgery is required for few chronic sports injuries like more complex spinal procedures and total joint replacements.

Related conferences: 4th International Conference on Orthopedics & Rheumatology, October 26-28, 2015, USA, Global Summit and Medicare Expo on Head & Neck Surgery, November 30-December 01, 2015 Atlanta, Georgia, USA, International Conference on Epilepsy & Treatment, September 21-22, 2015 Baltimore, USA, 18th Annual Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Conference, February 5-6, 2016 Bloomington, MN, 32nd AGA Congress, September 17-19, 2015, Innovative Techniques: The Knee Course, September 17-19, 2015, USA, Linking orthopedics & radiology – The plain film & management revisited III: The spine, October 15th 2015, UK, MOC MENA Orthopaedics Congress 2015, October 15-17, 2015, Germany

Track 5:Physical and Occupational Therapy & Rehabilitation

Physical therapy tends to be more focused on evaluating and diagnosing movement dysfunctions as well as treating a persons injury itself. While an occupational therapist will often also do diagnosis, the physical therapist will be more likely to diagnose and treat the physical source of the problem; the injured tissues and structures. Cardiovascular and Conditioning Physical Therapy: Sports Cardio conditioning improves circulation and strengthens the heart, lungs and blood vessels. It builds endurance and strength for the heart muscle, whether a person is well or recovering from a disease or injury Innovative Exercise Workshops. Importance of cardio in exercise it conditions the heart to work more efficiently, which helps prevent heart attacks or other heart ailments. It also increases oxygen to the blood, strengthens the heart and lungs, improves energy levels, burns calories and reduces cholesterol. Yoga and physical therapy is a physical, mental, and spiritual practice or discipline which originated in India. Physical therapy or physiotherapy and Mental Therapy Workshops (often abbreviated to PT) (also known as Movement Scientist) is a Rehabilitation profession that remediates impairments and promotes mobility, function, and quality of life through examination, diagnosis, prognosis, and physical intervention.

Related conference: 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, August 25-27, 2016 Philadelphia, USA, 2nd International Conference and Expo on Novel Physiotherapies June 9-11, 2016 London, UK, 4th International Conference on Weight Loss and Fitness Expo November 21-23, 2016 Dubai, UAE, 6th Global Healthcare & Fitness Summit August 22-24, 2016 Philadelphia, USA AOTA Annual Conference & Expo, April 7-10, 2016, USA, Taiwan Physical Therapy Association Congress, September 5-6, 2015, TBC, Taiwan, Physiotherapy Association of Trinidad & Tobago, Taiwan, Hong Kong Physiotherapy Association Conference, October 3-5, 2015, Hong Kong, 45th International Continence Society Annual Meeting, October 6-9, 2015 Canada

Track 6: Sports Nutrition and Supplements

Essential nutrients and supplements are very much important in sports, the more intense the exercise or sport, the greater the body’s nutrient needs. Athletes who participate in endurance sports have specific needs because of what they demand from their bodies. The first seven essential supplements are the minerals calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, selenium, sodium and zinc. Their benefits range from keeping bones strong to minimizing fatigue. Importance of proteins, minerals and water The RDA for protein is 60 mg per day for adults (specifically 0.8 g/kg of body weight/day). This recommendation, however, is based on the needs of sedentary individuals. Good hydration before, during and after exercise is very important. Isotonic drinks contain electrolytes and simple carbohydrates and are therefore recommended. Alcohol should not be drunk. Eating habits of individual athlete Physical performance is closely linked to nutrition, as a sports person with a healthy diet and good training will obtain better results in a competition than those individuals with the same qualities but an inadequate diet.

Related Conferences: World Congress on Public Health and Nutrition, March 10-12, 2016, Spain, 5th International Conference on Clinical Nutrition November 28-30, 2016 San Antonio, USA, 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Nutrition October 26-28, 2015 Chicago, Illinois, USA, 4th Asia Pacific Global Summit & Expo on Healthcare July 18-20, 2016 Brisbane, Australia, The International Society of Sports Nutrition, November 21-22, 2015, Brazil, The International Society of Sports Nutrition Aug 14 2016, Ireland, Sport Nutrition Conference September 27- 29, Germany, International Sport & Exercise Nutrition Conference December 15-17, UK

Track 7: Sports Psychology and Skills Acquisition

The use of psychological strategies and psychotherapy to improve sports performance has increased significantly over the past few decades. Coaches have realized that, particularly at elite level psychology plays a key role in determining the level of performance. The ability of the mind to generate thought patterns, influence emotions, stimulates or diminishes arousal and creates images of a desired action. Behavioral biomechanical and neural bases of development it aims to understand how human movement patterns are changed in characteristic ways when different emotions are expressed in healthy individuals and in individuals with mood disorders. Athletes need to be able to prepare for major competitions, reduce tension and stress that may have cause a decline in performance, and maintain high-level performances over a long period of time. Motivation is what drives behavior and is very important for athlete’s to reach an optimal level of performance. Biomechanics to enhance sports performances Biomechanics is a tool to understand human movement that can be applied to enhance athletic performance and prevent injury. Performance of a skill can be broken down into multiple layers of components, ranging from muscle strength to joint trajectories. Tools to measure human movement include video, accelerometry, medical imaging, and 3-D motion capture. Optimal movement is affected by body size and shape. Elite athletes move optimally and this knowledge can be used to coach and train others.

Related Conference: International conference on Adolescent Medicine & Child Psychology September 28-30, 2015 Houston, USA, International Conference on Psychiatric-Mental health Nursing October 03-05, 2016 UK, Experts Meeting on Forensic Psychology July 18-20, 2016 Brisbane, Australia, 2nd Annual Experts Meeting on Depression, Anxiety and Stress Management November 03-04, 2016 Valencia, Spain AASP’s 2015 Conference, October 14-17, Indiana, 44th Annual Meeting of the International Neuropsychology Association, February 3-6, 2016, USA, 12th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology, April 11 – 13, 2016

Track 8: Doping and Anti-Doping Study

The World Anti-Doping Agencys (WADA) Prohibited List is the comprehensive document serving as the international standard for identifying substances and methods prohibited in sport. Usage of anabolic steroids and its impact on health Anabolic steroids is the familiar name for synthetic variants of the male sex hormone testosterone. Anabolic steroids can be legally prescribed to treat conditions resulting from steroid hormone deficiency, such as delayed puberty, as well as diseases that result in loss of lean muscle mass, such as cancer and AIDS. But some athletes, bodybuilders, and others abuse these drugs in an attempt to enhance performance and/or improve their physical appearance. Drugtestingtechniques in sports are the techniques used to check the sports drug consumed by the athlete before or after the performance, Mass spectroscopy and gas chromatography may be the grey beards of sports drug testing, but their evolved forms can still snare you a cheat. Laws and ethics of sports: Sports law is the body of legal issues at work in the world of both amateur and professional sports. Sports law overlaps substantially with labor law, contract law, competition or antitrust law, and tort law.

Related Conferences: 4th International Conference on Translational Medicine October 26-28, 2015 Baltimore, Maryland, USA, 4th Global Summit on Healthcare November 09-11, 2015 Dubai, UAE, Global Summit on Herbals & Natural Remedies October 26-27, 2015 Chicago, USA, 6th Global Healthcare & Fitness Summit August 22-24, 2016 Philadelphia, USA Tackling Doping in Sport March 9-10, London, Conference of Parties (CoP) to the International Convention against Doping in Sport October 29-30, 2015, France, WADA Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) Experts Symposium, November 2-3, 2015, Qatar, South American RADO Board Meeting November 4-5, 2015, Ecuador, UNESCO’s Programme on Sport and Anti-doping October 27, 2015, Paris

Track 9: Sports Dentistry

Sports Dentistry is the treatment and prevention of oral/facial athletic injuries and related oral diseases and manifestations. 15 million Americans suffer dental injuries and 5 million teeth are lost annually in sports-related injuries. During a single athletic season, athletes have a 1 in 10 chance of suffering a facial or dental injury. In fact, the lifetime risk of such an injury is estimated to be about 45% according to the National Youth Sports Foundation. Dentistry plays a large role in treating oral and craniofacial injuries resulting from sporting activities. Many athletes are not aware of the health implications of a traumatic injury to the mouth or of the potential for incurring severe head and orofacial injuries while playing. The dentist can play an imperative role in informing athletes, coaches and patients about the importance of preventing orofacial injuries in sports. The aim of this paper is to increase professional awareness and interest for orientation toward sports dentistry. The most important aspect in preventing sports-related orofacial injuries is wearing basic protective devices such as properly-fitting helmets, facemasks and/or mouth guards. Perhaps the single most important piece of oral/facial protective equipment is a properly fitted mouth guard. Mouth guards should be worn when there is a possibility of body-to-body or body-to-equipment contact. Mouthguards help prevent injuries to the teeth, lips, gingiva, tongue, and mucosa.

Relate Conferences: 5th American Dental Congress October 05-07, 2015 Philadelphia, USA, 5th American Dental Congress October 05-07, 2015 Philadelphia, USA, British Dental Conference October 03-05, 2016 London, UK, 17th Asia-Pacific Dental and Oral Care Congress November 7-9, 2016, Australia, 10th Asia-Pacific Dental Congress October 24-26, 2016 Brisbane, Australia Austrian Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 20th Annual Congress January 26–26, 2016, Austria, Academy of Osseointegration 31st Annual Meeting February 17-26, 2016, USA, Association of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons of India 40th Annual Conference, November 19, 2015, India, International Congress of the Egyptian Orthodontic Society February 11-13, 2016, Egypt

Track 10: Computer Science and Technology in Sports

Electronic sports (also known as eSports, e-sports is a term for organized multiplayer video game competitions. The most common video game genres associated with electronic sports are real-time strategy, fighting, first-person shooter, and multiplayer online battle arena. Tournaments such as the League of Legends World Championship, The increasing availability of online video streaming platforms, particularly Twitch.tv, has become central to current eSports competitions Sports instrument equipment research With the development of the modern science and technology, new and high technology and the electronic instrument and equipment has been widely used in the referee work of the large scale track and field matches. Many sports instrument and equipment researches are going on for the improvement of the performance.

Related Conferences: Weight Loss and Medicare Expo, September 19-21, 2016, Austria, 7th Euro Health Care and Fitness Summit, September 26-28, 2016, UK, Health Informatics and Technology, June 27-29, 2016, USA, 17th International Conference on Sport Science, October 8 – 9, 2015, USA, International Conference on Sport Science and Physical Education September 18-20 2015, China, International Society of Physical & Rehabilitation Medicine World Congress May 29 – June 2, Malaysia, World Conference on Regenerative MedicineOctober21- 23 2015, Germany, International Congress on Sport and Health, Cotober2-3, 2015, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Sports and Entertainment Alliance in Technology, July 17-21, 2016, USA, Sports Media & Technology Conference, October 28-29, 2016, USA, Sports Performance & Tech Summit, November 4-5, UK, 18th International Conference on Sports Science and Technology, May 23 – 24, 2016, UK

Track 12: Natural and Herbal Medicine for Sports

Plant medicine and plant extracts in osteoarthritis Limitations in the conventional medical management of osteoarthritis indicate a real need for safe and effective treatment of osteoarthritis patients. Herbal medicines may provide a solution to this problem. Herbal medicines may treat these conditions effectively. Historically, people have used herbal medicines to prevent illness, cure infection, relieve fever, and heal wounds. Herbal medicines can also treat constipation, ease pain, or act as relaxants or stimulants. Research on some herbs and plant products has shown that they may have some of the same effects that conventional medicines do, while others may have no effect or may be harmful. Researchers have studied some natural products and have found them to be useful. Omega-3 fatty acids, for example, may help lower triglyceride levels. These medicine and ailments are useful in the treatments of many orthopedic and sports injuries.

Related Conferences: Global Summit on Herbals & Natural Remedies October 26-27, 2015 Chicago, USA, 4th Global Acupuncture and Therapists Annual Meeting July 14-16, 2016 Philadelphia, Holistics Medicine 2016 July 14-15, 2016 Philadelphia, 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Traditional & Alternative Medicine August 03-05, 2015 Birmingham, UK, The International Society of Sports Nutrition, November 21-22, 2015, Brazil, The International Society of Sports Nutrition Aug 14 2016, Ireland, Sport Nutrition Conference September 27- 29, Germany, International Sport & Exercise Nutrition Conference December 15-17, UK

After the success of the 1st International Conference on Soprts Medicine and Fitness in Chicago during March 23-25 2015,OMICS Internationalwith thegreat pleasure welcomes you to the official website of 2nd International Conference on Sports Medicine and Fitness which is going to be held during April 18-20, 2016 @ The Oberoi Dubai, Dubai, UAE

The main theme of the conference isTo evaluate the science involved in sports medicine and fitness”

Sports Medicine-2016 that aims at bringing together the Sports Medicine and Fitness professionals and students to providean international forum for the dissemination of original research results, new ideas and practical development experiences which concentrate on both theory and practices in our International Meetings. Sports Medicine-2016 is a multi-disciplinary conference of sports medicine physicians and sports medicine professionals dedicated to work, education, research, advocacy and the care of athletes of all ages.

The majority of Sports Medicine Members will be Doctors, Professors, Directors, CEOs, Researchers, Nutritionists, Physical Therapists, Sports Psychologists, Primary Care Physicians with fellowship training and added qualification in sports medicine who then combine their practice of sports medicine with their primary specialty. Sports Medicine-2016 also includes members who specialize in non-surgical sports medicine and serve as team physicians at the youth level, NCAA, NFL, MLB, NBA, WNBA, MLS and NHL, as well as with Olympic teams. By nature of their training and experience, sports medicine physicians are ideally suited to provide comprehensive medical care for athletes, sports teams or active individuals who are simply looking to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

OMICS Internationalthrough its Open Access Initiative is committed to make genuine and reliable contributions to the scientific community.OMICS Internationalis a pioneer and leading scientific event organizer, hosts over 500+ leading-edge peer reviewed Open Access Journalsand organizes over 300+International Scientific Conferencesall over the globe annually.

Various Workshop and Symposium sessions will throw light on its application in treating Sport related injuries and treatments. The active panel discussions will provide a perfect platform to explore the various methods and the medications for the treatment techniques which are being implemented across the globe, which demonstrates the evidence from research in sport science and physical activities

Importance & Scope:

Health play a vital role for any living being on this earth, nothing can be good, if the health is not good. Healthy and physically fit person can enjoy their lives more beautifully. Sports Medicine is the subjust which deals with all the health and physical related conditions of the athlates. Sports Medicine Conference is the most precious event which is directly related to health and wellness not only for the sports person/athletes but also for the people who are agonize with most of the diseases and disorders which are directly or indirectly related to the physical health and condition. Sports medicine is a towering subject which is related to physical health and conditions.

There is a huge demand for the sports medicine in most of the countries where sports and physical health are given more important. Sports Medicine 2016 aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results about all aspects of Sports, Physical Health, Injuries and Medicine. It also provides the chance for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns, practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted in the fields of Sports Medicine and Fitness.

Sports Medicine2016 is an international platform for presenting research about marketing, exchanging ideas about it and thus, contributes to the dissemination of knowledge in marketing for the benefit of both the academia and business. Sports Medicine2016 is where the future of Sports Medicine and Fitness intersects. This event brings together the most of the eminent persons, researchers, scientists to explore there invaluable knowledge. Sports Medicine2016 is where Sports marketers go to gain perspective on the latest Sports technologies, emerging start-ups, and opportunities that will drive the future of the Sports Medicine and Fitness. We bring together business, creative, and technology leaders from the Sports Medicine market and Sports Medicine industry for the most current and relevant.

Why Dubai?

Dubai has emerged as a global city and business hub of the Persian Gulf region. It is also a major transport hub for passengers and cargo. It is a world’s fastest growing economies, Dubai’s gross domestic product is projected at USD 107.1 billion, with a growth rate of 6.1% in 2014. It is estimated that Dubai produces 50,000 to 70,000 barrels (7,900 to 11,100 m3) of oil a day and substantial quantities of gas from offshore fields.

Architecture: Dubai has a rich collection of buildings and structures of various architectural styles. Many modern interpretations of Islamic architecture can be found here. Burj Khalifa (The 828 meters tallest building in the world and a skyscraper in Dubai, UAE. It is a world-class destination and the magnificent place at Downtown Dubai), Burj Al Arab (The Burj Al Arab (Arabic: , Tower of the Arabs) is a 7 star luxury hotel. Although the hotel is frequently described as “the world’s only seven-Star hotel) Dubai, Miracle Garden (On Valentine’s Day 2013, the Dubai Miracle Garden, a 72,000-square meter flower garden, opened in Dubai land. It is currently the world’s largest flower garden. It has 45 million flowers with re-use of waste water through drip irrigation)

Food: Arabic food is very popular and is available everywhere in the city, from the small shawarma diners in Deira and Al Karama to the restaurants in Dubai’s hotels. Fast food, South Asian, and Chinese cuisines are also very popular and are widely available. Dubai is known for its nightlife. Clubs and bars are found mostly in hotels due to the liquor laws. The New York Times described Dubai as “the kind of city where you might run into Michael Jordan at the Buddha Bar or stumble across Naomi Campbell celebrating her birthday with a multiday bash”

Sports: Football and cricket are the most popular sports in Dubai which attract sports stars from around the world. The Dubai World Cup, a thoroughbred horse race, is held annually at the Meydan Racecourse. Dubai also hosts the traditional rugby union tournament Dubai Sevens, part of the Sevens World Series. In 2009, Dubai hosted the 2009 Rugby World Cup Sevens.

Conference Highlights:

Sports and Health

Sports Education and Sports Training

Exercise Physiology and Role of Hormones in Sport and Fitness

Injuries and Orthopedic Surgeries in Sports and Fitness

Sports Nutrition and Sports Medicine

Physical Therapies for Multiple Diseases

Technologies Assisting Sport and Exercise Facilitation

Computer Science Involved In Sports Science

Motor Skill Acquisition and Sports Psychology

Multidisciplinary Contributions To Sports Science

Natural or Herbal Medicine for Sports

Special Focus for 2016: Sport and Development

Why to attend???

Sports Medicine is one of the most important topic, With members from around the world focused on learning about Sports, physical health and other sports related activities, this is your single best opportunity to reach the largest assemblage of participants from the Sports and health community. Conduct demonstrations, distribute information, meet with current and potential Researchers, Scientists, Business Personals, and Industrialis , make a splash with an invaluable knowledge and receive name recognition at this 3-day event. World-renowned speakers, the most recent techniques, tactics, and the newest updates in Sports Medicine and Fitness fields are hallmarks of this conference.

A Unique Opportunity for Advertisers and Sponsors at this International event:

http://sports.conferenceseries.com/sponsors.php

Major Sports Medicine Universities, colleges/Institutions around the world

George Washington University

University of Michigan (UM)

University of Pittsburgh

University of the Rockies

Iowa State University

The University of Alabama

American InterContinental University

Major Sports Medicine Universities, colleges/Institutions in UAE

American University of Sharjah

United Arab Emirates University

Northumbria University

University of Sharjah

Paris-Sorbonne University Abu Dhabi

Major Sports Medicine Universities, colleges/Institutions in Dubai

ETA College

New York University in Abu Dhabi

Dubai British School

Statistical Analysis of Sports Medicine Universities:

Major Sports Medicine Associations around the Globe

International Society of Arthroscopy, Knee Surgery and Orthopaedic Sports Medicine.

The International Sports Sciences Association (ISSA) USA

International Council of Sport Science and Physical Education (ICSSPE) Germany

Indian Association of Sports Medicine (IASM)

American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine

American Medical Societies for Sports medicine and The British Association of Sports and Medicine

Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine

World Institute of Sports Sciences (WISS), Florida

The South African Sports Medicine Association

California Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (CAHPERD)

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CoxHealth Robotic Surgery – Cox Hospital – Springfield …

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on CoxHealth Robotic Surgery – Cox Hospital – Springfield …

You’ve just been diagnosed with a condition requiring surgery. Until recently, your options included traditional surgery with a large open incision, or laparoscopy, which uses small incisions but is typically limited to simple procedures.

Our surgeons perform complex and delicate proceduresthat can result in smaller incisions, less blood loss and shorter hospital stays, according to clinical follow-up with robotic procedures performed at CoxHealth. Data from larger national studies have shown that robotic surgery may also offer less pain and shorter recovery times.

Robotic surgery does not place a robot at the controls. Instead, your surgeon controls every aspect of the surgery with the assistance of a console and robotic arms.A monitor provides the surgeon with a 3-D image of the surgical area, whereas traditional laparoscopy offers a 2-D view.

The surgeon’s fingers grasp the master controls below the display with hands and wrists naturally positioned relative to his or her eyes. The “Endo-wrist” features of the operating arms precisely replicate the skilled movements of the surgeon, allowing for precise movements within a small operating space.

Clinical follow-up with robotic procedures performed at CoxHealth has shown:

Data from larger national studies have shown that robotic surgery may also offer less pain andshorter recovery times.

As with all surgical procedures, there are some risks. Talk to your doctor to see if robotic surgery is right for you.

Call 417/269-INFO for more information.

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Nanotechnology – Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nanotechnology – Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nanotechnology is a part of science and technology about the control of matter on the atomic and molecular scale – this means things that are about 100 nanometres or smaller.[1]

Nanotechnology includes making products that use parts this small, such as electronic devices, catalysts, sensors, etc. To give you an idea of how small that is, there are more nanometres in an inch than there are inches in 400 miles.[2]

To give a international idea of how small that is, there are as many nanometres in a centimetre, as there are centimetres in 100 kilometres.

Nanotechnology brings together scientists and engineers from many different subjects, such as applied physics, materials science, interface and colloid science, device physics, chemistry, supramolecular chemistry (which refers to the area of chemistry that focuses on the non-covalent bonding interactions of molecules), self-replicating machines and robotics, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, biology, biological engineering, and electrical engineering.

Generally, when people talk about nanotechnology, they mean structures of the size 100 nanometers or smaller. There are one million nanometers in a millimeter. Nanotechnology tries to make materials or machines of that size.

People are doing many different types of work in the field of nanotechnology. Most current work looks at making nanoparticles (particles with nanometer size) that have special properties, such as the way they scatter light, absorb X-rays, transport electrical currents or heat, etc. At the more “science fiction” end of the field are attempts to make small copies of bigger machines or really new ideas for structures that make themselves. New materials are possible with nano size structures. It is even possible to work with single atoms.

There has been a lot of discussion about the future of nanotechnology and its dangers. Nanotechnology may be able to invent new materials and instruments which would be very useful, such as in medicine, computers, and making clean electricity (nanotechnology) is helping design the next generation of solar panels, and efficient low-energy lighting). On the other hand, nanotechnology is new and there could be unknown problems. For example if the materials are bad for people’s health or for nature. They may have a bad effect on the economy or even big natural systems like the Earth itself. Some groups argue that there should be rules about the use of nanotechnology.

Ideas of nanotechnology were first used in talk “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom”, a talk given by the scientist Richard Feynman at an American Physical Society meeting at Caltech on December 29, 1959. Feynman described a way to move individual atoms to build smaller instruments and operate at that scale. Properties such as surface tension and Van der walls force would become very important.

Feynman’s simple idea seemed possible. The word “nanotechnology” was explained by Tokyo Science University Professor Norio Taniguchi in a 1974 paper. He said that nanotechnology was the work of changing materials by one atom or by one molecule. In the 1980s this idea was studied by Dr. K. Eric Drexler, who spoke and wrote about the importance of nano-scale events . “Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology” (1986) is thought to be the first book on nanotechnology. Nanotechnology and Nano science started with two key developments: the start of cluster science and the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Soon afterwards, new molecules with carbon were discovered – first fullerenes in 1986 and carbon nanotubes a few years later. In another development, people studied how to make semiconductor nano crystals. Many metal oxide nanoparticles are now used as quantum dots (nanoparticles where the behaviour of single electrons becomes important). In 2000, the United States National Nanotechnology Initiative began to develop science in this field.

Nanotechnology has nanomaterials which can be classified into one, two and three dimensions nanoparticles. This classification is based upon different properties it holds such as scattering of light, absorbing x rays, transport electric current or heat. Nanotechnology has multidisciplinary character affecting multiple traditional technologies and different scientific disciplines. New materials which can be scaled even at atomic size can be manufactured.

At nano scale physical properties of system or particles substantially change. Physical properties such as quantum size effects where electrons move different for very small sizes of particle. Properties such as mechanical, electrical and optical changes when macroscopic system changes to microscopic one which is of utmost importance.

Nano materials and particles can act as catalyst to increase the reaction rate along with that produce better yield as compared to other catalyst. Some of the most interesting properties when particle gets converted to nano scale are substances which usually stop light become transparent (copper); it becomes possible to burn some materials (aluminum); solids turn into liquids at room temperature (gold); insulators become conductors (silicon). A material such as gold, which does not react with other chemicals at normal scales, can be a powerful chemical catalyst at nanoscales. These special properties which we can only see at the nano scale are one of the most interesting things about nanotechnology.

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Kids.Net.Au – Encyclopedia > Nanotechnology

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Kids.Net.Au – Encyclopedia > Nanotechnology

Nanotechnology refers to exploratory engineering at the atomic and molecular level, where the nanometer is a common unit of length. The term is sometimes used to describe any microscopic technology. Physically, real nanotechnology relates to sizes of only a few atoms’ width. Implementing nanotechnology in its fullest sense would require the ability to directly manipulate atoms or molecules. It is sometimes referred to as Molecular nanotechnology to distinguish it from Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS).

A more neutral term that does not imply the hype and speculation that surround this field is “molecular engineering” – progress towards actual engineering at these scales is discussed in that article. This article focuses on the longer-term potential and speculations surrounding ‘nanotechnology’ as it was originally conceived.

Ralph Merkle has compared today’s chemistry to an attempt to build interesting Lego brick constructions while wearing boxing gloves. Because we currently have no tools that allow us to place a particular atom in a particular place (so that it bonds in a predictable way with another particular atom), we must work with statistically large numbers of atoms. As a result, when we cause a particular chemical reaction, we frequently get a mix of several different product species. The reaction is often followed by a physical filtering process to extract the species we actually wanted, with the other species discarded as waste. Nanotechnology could therefore offer much cleaner manufacturing processes than are available with today’s bulk technology.

The first mention of nanotechnology (not yet using that name) was in a talk given by Richard Feynman in 1959, entitled There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom. Feynman suggested a means to develop the ability to manipulate atoms and molecules directly, by developing a set of one-tenth-scale machine tools analogous to those found in any machine shop. These small tools would be used to develop and operate a next generation of one-hundredth-scale machine tools, and so forth. As the sizes get smaller, it would be necessary to redesign some tools because the relative strength of various forces would change. Gravity would become less important, surface tension would become more important, van der Waals attraction would become important, etc. Feynman mentioned these scaling issues during his talk. The feasibility of his proposal has never been effectively refuted.

The term nanotechnology was first used by K. Eric Drexler in his 1986 book Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology.

In the fourth chapter, Drexler introduces self-replication (see also Von Neumann machine), another powerful premise of nanotechnology. Cells build copies of themselves in order to reproduce, and human-designed molecular robots could do the same thing. This would mean that after the enormous research expense of designing and constructing the first molecular robot capable of self-replication, the next trillion robots would on the order of an equal mass in vegetables. Further, to the owners it would seem just as (un)amazing.

These same generally capable robots, called assemblers, could then build more special-purpose objects that humans would find directly useful: houses, kitchen widgets, cars, furniture, medical instruments, spaceships, etc. Like the assemblers themselves, these products would be extremely cheap by comparison with those produced today. Specifically, the inputs to any such manufacturing process would be raw materials (atoms), energy, design software, and time.

Another application of nanotechnology is utility fog [[1] (http://discuss.foresight.org/~josh/Ufog)] — in which a cloud of networked microscopic robots (simpler than assemblers) changes its shape and properties to form macroscopic objects and tools in accordance with software commands. Rather than modify the current practices of consuming material goods in different forms, utility fog would simply replace most physical objects.

Whilst progress has been made in producing ever-smaller computer circuits and nanowires, and manipulating individual atoms, constructing real nanomachines is currently well beyond our present capabilities and is generally believed to be at least decades away. Many doubt that controllable self-replicating nanobots are possible at all, citing the possibility of mutations removing any control and favouring reproduction of the mutant pathogenic variations. Advocates counter that bacteria are designed to mutate, and nanobot mutation can be prevented by common error-correcting techniques used in computers today. Research in this area has included the development of simulation software, such as NanoCAD.

Despite its current infeasibility, there has been much speculation about the impact of nanotechnology on economics and law. Some believe that money would cease to be of use and taxation would cease to be feasible. Others conjecture that nanotechnology would elicit a strong public-opinion backlash, as has occurred recently around genetically modified plants and the prospect of human cloning. Whatever the exact effects, nanotechnology is likely to upset existing economic structures, as it should reduce the scarcity of manufactured goods and make many more goods (such as food and health aids) manufacturable.

Most futurists and all economists believe there would still be a need for money, in the form of unforgeable digital cash. It might be used to buy goods and services that are unique, or limited within the solar system. These might include: matter, energy, information, real estate, design services, entertainment services, legal services, fame, political power, or the attention of other people to your political/religious/philisophical message. Beyond that, there is war, even between prosperous states, and non-economic goals to consider.

Most people believe that virtual reality will not much reduce interest in obtaining limited resources, such as a chance to talk to the real president of a major country, or owning part of the real Jerusalem, or having a famous celebrity say nice things about you in a digitally-signed document, or gaining the mining rights to the larger near-earth asteroids. Demand will always exceed supply for some things, and there will continue to be a political economy in any case.

Beyond the fantasy scenarios, nanotechnology has daunting risks. It enables cheaper and more destructive conventional weapons. Also, nanotechnology permits weapons of mass destruction that self-replicate, as viruses and cancer cells do when attacking the human body. There is general agreement that self-replication should be permitted only very controlled conditions, if at all.

There is a fear that nanomechanical robots (nanobots) allowed to self-replicate could consume the entire planet in their hunger for raw materials, or simply crowd out natural life, out-competing it for energy (as happened historically when blue-green algae appeared and outcompeted earlier life forms. This situation is sometimes called the “grey goo” or “ecophagy” scenario. It is considered one of the more likely ends of a technological singularity.

In light of these dangers, the Foresight Institute (founded by Drexler to prepare for the arrival of future technologies) has drafted a set of guidelines [2] (http://www.foresight.org/guidelines/current) for the ethical development of nanotechnology. These include the banning of self-replicating pseudo-organisms on the Earth’s surface, at least, and possibly other places.

Drexler and others have extended the ideas of nanotechnology with two more books, Unbounding the Future: the Nanotechnology Revolution [3] (http://www.foresight.org/UTF/Unbound_LBW/) and Nanosystems: molecular machinery, manufacturing, and computation [4] (http://www.zyvex.com/nanotech/nanosystems). Unbounding the Future is an easy-to-read book that introduces the ideas of nanotechnology in a not-too-technical way, and Nanosystems is an in-depth analysis of several possible nanotechnological devices, with thorough scientific analyses of their feasibility and performance. Another notable work in the same vein is Nanomedicine by Robert Freitas.

Nanotechnology has also become a prominent theme in science fiction [5] (http://www.geocities.com/asnapier/nano/n-sf/), for example with the Borg in Star Trek, Neal Stephenson’s book The Diamond Age, and Wil McCarthy’s book Bloom[?]. These deal with various dangerous potentials of molecular engineering but in a generally reassuring manner, i.e. even ecophagy is considered to be a livable outcome. Some have compared this to the post-apocalyptic science fiction that presupposed that survival of mutual assured destruction was possible or even desirable.

See also: weapons of mass destruction, molecular engineering, protein engineering

External Links

All Wikipedia text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License

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Nanotechnology Now – Nanotechnology Columns

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nanotechnology Now – Nanotechnology Columns

Home > Nanotechnology Columns

Columns: USA Nano Initiatives Nanotechnology Tomorrow Universities NANOART Commercialising Nanomaterials Nanomedicine Nano Investing Scientific Publishing Nano Solar Nanotechnology news from Japan Nanotechnology in the UK Interviews Nanotechnology in Asia Education International Nanotechnology Opportunities Nanotechnology Tools Understanding Nanotechnology Manufacturing Nanotechnology and Patents Nanotechnology in Russia Regional Initiatives Nanofiber Nanotech and Education Scenarios and Solutions for a Nano-World Nanotechology Policy Disruptive Technologies Transhumanism Nanobiotechnology Nanotechnology for a better world NanoTech for Defense & Intelligence Nanotechnology in Space Maximizing progress and benefits of Nanotechnology Ethics Atomic Layer Deposition Nano Emerging Real Nano/MEMS Products Today Nanoparticles Clean Energy Nanoelectronics Alberta & the Future of Nanotechnology Nanotechnology Industries Association Nanotechnology for Every-Day-Life in India

USA Nano Initiatives

Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

Barg Coffin Lewis & Trapp LLP

Nanotechnology Tomorrow

The Future of Nanotechnology

Nanotechnology and Zero Net Energy Housing

Center for Responsible Nanotechnology

Universities

Florida Polytechnic University

UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

Northeastern University School of Law

University of Idaho

NANOART

NanoMuse

Cristian Orfescu

Commercialising Nanomaterials

Nanomedicine

Polymerically Yours

Nanomedicine: The Future of Medicine

Dr. Arun Kumar

Nano Investing

Alan Shalleck-NanoClarity

Born 15 years ago with the National Nanotechnology Initiative, the nanotechnology dream continues through the Graphene World. “Graphene applications will finally provide the long promised nanotech economic riches.” The Graphene World (applications of planar single atom thick Nano sized sheets of linked carbon atoms technology) to many scientists and investors is the new realizable Carbon Nanotube (CNT) World! If CNT’s potentially were good but unrealizable; Graphene should be better and, from what we have learned, realizable! “Look what we can do with them,” they say. The rush is on … but (pardon my English) it is djs-vu all over again. Read the Whole Article

Should Investors Roll the Dice with Nanotechnology?

Pearl Chin-Seraphimaventures.com

Scientific Publishing

Keep Calm and Publish Papers

Nano Solar

Emerging Techniques for Organic Photovoltaics

Bo Varga

Nanotechnology news from Japan

Nanotechnology in the UK

Interviews

Nanotechnology in Asia

NanoGlobe

Asian Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Association (ANNA)

Education

International Nanotechnology Opportunities

NanoLandGlobal

Please contact for any further clarifications. Read the Whole Article

Vivek Srivastava

Nanotechnology Tools

Park Systems

NT-MDT

FEI

Today’s advanced semiconductors are truly nano-scale devices. For example, the latest generally-available PC processors feature transistor line-widths as small as 45 nm, and process development is underway at leading manufacturers for 32 nm, 22 nm, and even smaller geometries.

The adage, “Time is money” has an overwhelming relevance in the world of volume semiconductor production. Getting to market, enhancing yields and ramping to volume– faster– is business-critical, and overcoming the associated nano-scale manufacturing challenges requires sophisticated “forensics.” In other words, advanced manufacturing process development and control applications require advanced imaging and analysis tools to characterize defects, analyze failures, and measure critical dimensions. Read the Whole Article

Understanding Nanotechnology

Manufacturing

Practical Nano-Tech

National Nanotechnology Manufacturing Center

Nanotechnology and Patents

Francisco Castro, Ph.D., J.D.

Magda Carvalho PhD, JD

Nanotechnology in Russia

Regional Initiatives

Piedmont Triad Partnership

ONAMI

US-EU-Africa-Asia-Pacific and Caribbean Nanotechnology Initiative (USEACANI)

Nanofiber

Xanofi

So what are your options if you don’t live in Silicon Valley? What are the pros and cons of different strategies that help to minimize under-capitalization? Read the Whole Article

Nanotech and Education

Nanoscience Education & Workforce Training

Abstract: Why do all students have to learn about nanoscale science?

Over the past 15 years I have attempted to answer this question in many ways, sometimes successfully and more often than not, have faced objections from all levels of educators. There are many stumbling blocks placed against inclusion of new areas of science in all grades. Many educators have become complacent teaching only the required standard-based curriculum for students in K-12. Many educators state that students are struggling to learn the basics in these primary subjects and are not competent in passing standardized testing in math, reading and grammar. Therefore, science topics are considered too difficult for them to comprehend at an early age. Getting past this first objection, along with the fact that teachers are overloaded with paperwork, mandatory state and federal testing and do not have time to introduce a new subject, has been an ongoing challenge. The second issue stated by teachers, “They do not know where to insert the resources developed as nanoscale science curriculum into their current teaching matrix. The universities that developed the curriculum did not match it to their current textbooks.” Read the Whole Article

Scenarios and Solutions for a Nano-World

Lifeboat Foundation

Which of Joel’s headlines will be considered the most important a millennium from now?

This column discusses five of the most important, and tries to make the case that three of them will become irrelevant, while one will be remembered for as long as the human race exists (one is uncertain). The five contenders are: The Bomb The Pill African Colonies Television Moonshot Read the Whole Article

Nanotechology Policy

Disruptive Technologies

Transhumanism

Natasha Vita-More

Nanobiotechnology

Nanotechnology for a better world

Neil Gordon

Maintaining the status quo will likely lead to a greater number of illnesses from an aging population with an increasing number of sick, immuno-compromised, and malnourished who are less able to fight off pathogens and toxins. This will place a greater burden on the health care system. Rebuilding under-capacity water treatment plants and deteriorating water distribution infrastructure will take decades and approach a trillion dollars nationally in the next 20 years. A more cost-effective solution is to implement a new generation of nanotechnology-based inline sensors that rapidly detect a diverse suite of pathogens and toxins, along with updated regulations and meaningful enforcement. This will allow water operators to more quickly identify dangerous contaminants and take actions to prevent contaminated water from reaching consumers. With a network of sensors providing precise information about the sources of infiltration, water administrators would be able to prioritize major infrastructure projects by measuring the potential health benefit versus the cost of prospective investments. Read the Whole Article

NanoTech for Defense & Intelligence

Nanotechnology in Space

Maximizing progress and benefits of Nanotechnology

Ethics

Nanoethics

Atomic Layer Deposition

Nano Emerging

Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies

Real Nano/MEMS Products Today

Nanoparticles

Clean Energy

Nanocatalyst

Nanoelectronics

Alberta & the Future of Nanotechnology

Nanotechnology Industries Association

Steffi Friedrichs

Nanotechnology for Every-Day-Life in India

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Nanotechnology Now – Nanotechnology Columns

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Nanotechnology Degrees & Courses | La Trobe University

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nanotechnology Degrees & Courses | La Trobe University

Why study Nanotechnology?

Nanotechnology is the science of the very small -working on a scale of nanometres, amillionth of a millimetre. New products and processes are developed where physics, chemistry, biology and engineering meet. Nanotechnology applications include computer technology, healthcare, sustainability and helping to make vehicles and machines faster, lighter and stronger.

We offer an undergraduate program and a combined Bachelor and Master’s course. Top students can blend a Master’s qualification in nanotechnology with an honours-level science program.

Learn more about our nanotechnology program.

Our graduates have been placed and employed in businesses such as SGS, Rio Tinto, Dulux, Starpharma, Air Services Australia, Crocodile Gold Corp., Australian Radiation Services, CETEC-Foray and the Australian Academy of Technological Science and Engineering.

You can find work in roles such as physicist, chemist, space physicist or research scientist.

Read more about nanotechnology careers.

Choose one of three streams – nanostructured materials, bio-nanotechnology or physics at the nanoscale – and take on a variety of subjects like nanochemistry, scanning probe microscopies, synchrotron science, and nanomaterials and fabrication.

This course provides you with a comprehensive learning experience, combining lab work, practical placements and study tours. In third year, you’ll undertake a major research project in collaboration with researchers from within the university or overseas. You’ll have access to the $100 million La Trobe Institute of Molecular Science and may work with our industry partners such as CSIRO, Australian Synchrotron and miniFAB.

As part of your course, you’ll undertake a study tour to Japan where you’ll visit research labs in Tokyo as well as attend the Nano Tech Exhibition and Conference – the world’s largest nanotech trade exhibition. To keep you up to date with other industry developments, we organise the ‘Issues in Nanotech’ seminar series. Topics include nanotechnology in cancer research, nano-sunscreen technology and creating automotive semiconductor products.

The course structure lets you complete the required subjects for this 4.5 year degree in only four years.

To find out more about this course and studying at La Trobe: – ask us a question – chat online – visit our FAQ page – connect with us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram – call us on 1300 135 045.

Fields set to benefit from nanotech include medicine, manufacturing, computing, environmental sustainability, textiles and cosmetics. In fact, anywhere that physics, chemistry, biology and engineering intersect can benefit from nanotechnology.

This degree gives you knowledge of biochemistry, chemistry, mathematics, physics as well as nanotech subjects including nanomaterials and fabrication, synchrotron science and technology, and bionanotechnology.

Our focus on practical skills and experience means you’ll develop your own nanotech project in your final year as you complete your Master’s thesis, hosted by a leading research group or organisation, for example CSIRO. Fifth year also includes a study tour – in 2013 our students travelled to the Nano Tech Exhibition and Conference in Tokyo.

Our cadetship program provides work experience in industries like manufacturing, mining, pharmaceuticals and consulting. You can also take advantage of overseas study opportunities with our exchange partners in over 30 countries, and may be eligible for scholarships including the Ambassador Scholarships in Engineering and Mathematical Sciences and the Dean’s Scholarship for Academic Excellence.

To find out more about this course and studying at La Trobe: – ask us a question – chat online – visit our FAQ page – connect with us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram – call us on 1300 135 045.

Choose one of three streams – nanostructured materials, bio-nanotechnology or physics at the nanoscale – and take on a variety of subjects like nanochemistry, scanning probe microscopies, synchrotron science, and nanomaterials and fabrication.

This course provides you with a comprehensive learning experience, combining lab work, practical placements and study tours. In third year, you’ll undertake a major research project in collaboration with researchers from within the university or overseas. You’ll have access to the $100 million La Trobe Institute of Molecular Science and may work with our industry partners such as CSIRO, Australian Synchrotron and miniFAB.

As part of your course, you’ll undertake a study tour to Japan where you’ll visit research labs in Tokyo as well as attend the Nano Tech Exhibition and Conference – the world’s largest nanotech trade exhibition. To keep you up to date with other industry developments, we organise the ‘Issues in Nanotech’ seminar series. Topics include nanotechnology in cancer research, nano-sunscreen technology and creating automotive semiconductor products.

The course structure lets you complete the required subjects for this 4.5 year degree in only four years.

Fields set to benefit from nanotech include medicine, manufacturing, computing, environmental sustainability, textiles and cosmetics. In fact, anywhere that physics, chemistry, biology and engineering intersect can benefit from nanotechnology.

This degree gives you knowledge of biochemistry, chemistry, mathematics, physics as well as nanotech subjects including nanomaterials and fabrication, synchrotron science and technology, and bionanotechnology.

Our focus on practical skills and experience means you’ll develop your own nanotech project in your final year as you complete your Master’s thesis, hosted by a leading research group or organisation, for example CSIRO. Fifth year also includes a study tour – in 2013 our students travelled to the Nano Tech Exhibition and Conference in Tokyo.

Our cadetship program provides work experience in industries like manufacturing, mining, pharmaceuticals and consulting. You can also take advantage of overseas study opportunities with our exchange partners in over 30 countries, and may be eligible for scholarships including the Ambassador Scholarships in Engineering and Mathematical Sciences and the Dean’s Scholarship for Academic Excellence.

Choose one of three streams – nanostructured materials, bio-nanotechnology or physics at the nanoscale – and take on a variety of subjects like nanochemistry, scanning probe microscopies, synchrotron science, and nanomaterials and fabrication.

This course provides you with a comprehensive learning experience, combining lab work, practical placements and study tours. In third year, you’ll undertake a major research project in collaboration with researchers from within the university or overseas. You’ll have access to the $100 million La Trobe Institute of Molecular Science and may work with our industry partners such as CSIRO, Australian Synchrotron and miniFAB.

As part of your course, you’ll undertake a study tour to Japan where you’ll visit research labs in Tokyo as well as attend the Nano Tech Exhibition and Conference – the world’s largest nanotech trade exhibition. To keep you up to date with other industry developments, we organise the ‘Issues in Nanotech’ seminar series. Topics include nanotechnology in cancer research, nano-sunscreen technology and creating automotive semiconductor products.

The course structure lets you complete the required subjects for this 4.5 year degree in only four years.

TOEFL Paper-based Test – a minimum overall score of 550 with a score of 5 or more in the Test of Written English;

TOEFL Internet-based Test – a minimum overall score of 60 with a minimum for SLR 18; W 22;

Satisfactory completion of the English for Further Studies Advanced Stage 5B (EFS5 UG minimum 60 per cent) which is available from La Trobe Melbourne; for more information please visit the La Trobe Melbourne website.

La Trobe Melbourne Foundation Studies: 60 per cent final result in a course;

English as the language of instruction in tertiary studies may be accepted. Please note: English as the language of instruction in previous study will not be accepted as a basis of admission (English) for courses where the approved test score requirement is above an IELTS 6.5 with no band score lower than 6.0.

Pearson Test of English (Academic) (PTE): a minimum score of 57 with no communicative skill score less than 50.

Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): a grade of B or higher.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): a pass grade of C or higher;

or approved international equivalent.

If you do not meet these entry requirements you might be interested in La Trobe’s Foundation Studies and Diploma Programs, which provide an alternative pathway to La Trobe’s undergraduate program. For more information please visit the La Trobe Melbourne website.

Please apply through VTAC if youre completing your VCE or International Baccalaureate (IB) in Victoria, or apply through UAC if youre completing your HSC or IB in New South Wales.

Fields set to benefit from nanotech include medicine, manufacturing, computing, environmental sustainability, textiles and cosmetics. In fact, anywhere that physics, chemistry, biology and engineering intersect can benefit from nanotechnology.

This degree gives you knowledge of biochemistry, chemistry, mathematics, physics as well as nanotech subjects including nanomaterials and fabrication, synchrotron science and technology, and bionanotechnology.

Our focus on practical skills and experience means you’ll develop your own nanotech project in your final year as you complete your Master’s thesis, hosted by a leading research group or organisation, for example CSIRO. Fifth year also includes a study tour – in 2013 our students travelled to the Nano Tech Exhibition and Conference in Tokyo.

Our cadetship program provides work experience in industries like manufacturing, mining, pharmaceuticals and consulting. You can also take advantage of overseas study opportunities with our exchange partners in over 30 countries, and may be eligible for scholarships including the Ambassador Scholarships in Engineering and Mathematical Sciences and the Dean’s Scholarship for Academic Excellence.

TOEFL Paper-based Test – a minimum overall score of 550 with a score of 5 or more in the Test of Written English;

TOEFL Internet-based Test – a minimum overall score of 60 with a minimum for SLR 18; W 22;

Satisfactory completion of the English for Further Studies Advanced Stage 5B (EFS5 UG minimum 60 per cent) which is available from La Trobe Melbourne; for more information please visit the La Trobe Melbourne website.

La Trobe Melbourne Foundation Studies: 60 per cent final result in a course;

English as the language of instruction in tertiary studies may be accepted. Please note: English as the language of instruction in previous study will not be accepted as a basis of admission (English) for courses where the approved test score requirement is above an IELTS 6.5 with no band score lower than 6.0.

Pearson Test of English (Academic) (PTE): a minimum score of 57 with no communicative skill score less than 50.

Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): a grade of B or higher.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): a pass grade of C or higher;

or approved international equivalent.

If you do not meet these entry requirements you might be interested in La Trobe’s Foundation Studies and Diploma Programs, which provide an alternative pathway to La Trobe’s undergraduate program. For more information please visit the La Trobe Melbourne website.

The broad study of science and nanotechnology offers you many opportunities across the science-based industries, in research laboratories, and in the emerging global nanotechnology industries. Graduates are likely to find work in: – advanced materials – semiconductor and microelectronic technologies – advanced medical diagnostics – mineral processing – aerospace and defence industries – chemicals and polymer manufacture – surface coating technologies – government and private sector research laboratories.

A cross-disciplinary background means graduates can also look for opportunities in areas where the traditional sciences intersect.

Please apply through VTAC if youre completing your VCE or International Baccalaureate (IB) in Victoria, or apply through UAC if youre completing your HSC or IB in New South Wales.

Choose one of three streams – nanostructured materials, bio-nanotechnology or physics at the nanoscale – and take on a variety of subjects like nanochemistry, scanning probe microscopies, synchrotron science, and nanomaterials and fabrication.

This course provides you with a comprehensive learning experience, combining lab work, practical placements and study tours. In third year, you’ll undertake a major research project in collaboration with researchers from within the university or overseas. You’ll have access to the $100 million La Trobe Institute of Molecular Science and may work with our industry partners such as CSIRO, Australian Synchrotron and miniFAB.

As part of your course, you’ll undertake a study tour to Japan where you’ll visit research labs in Tokyo as well as attend the Nano Tech Exhibition and Conference – the world’s largest nanotech trade exhibition. To keep you up to date with other industry developments, we organise the ‘Issues in Nanotech’ seminar series. Topics include nanotechnology in cancer research, nano-sunscreen technology and creating automotive semiconductor products.

The course structure lets you complete the required subjects for this 4.5 year degree in only four years.

TOEFL Paper-based Test – a minimum overall score of 550 with a score of 5 or more in the Test of Written English;

TOEFL Internet-based Test – a minimum overall score of 60 with a minimum for SLR 18; W 22;

Satisfactory completion of the English for Further Studies Advanced Stage 5B (EFS5 UG minimum 60 per cent) which is available from La Trobe Melbourne; for more information please visit the La Trobe Melbourne website.

La Trobe Melbourne Foundation Studies: 60 per cent final result in a course;

English as the language of instruction in tertiary studies may be accepted. Please note: English as the language of instruction in previous study will not be accepted as a basis of admission (English) for courses where the approved test score requirement is above an IELTS 6.5 with no band score lower than 6.0.

Pearson Test of English (Academic) (PTE): a minimum score of 57 with no communicative skill score less than 50.

Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): a grade of B or higher.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): a pass grade of C or higher;

or approved international equivalent.

If you do not meet these entry requirements you might be interested in La Trobe’s Foundation Studies and Diploma Programs, which provide an alternative pathway to La Trobe’s undergraduate program. For more information please visit the La Trobe Melbourne website.

Please apply through VTAC if youre completing your VCE or International Baccalaureate (IB) in Victoria, or apply through UAC if youre completing your HSC or IB in New South Wales.

Fields set to benefit from nanotech include medicine, manufacturing, computing, environmental sustainability, textiles and cosmetics. In fact, anywhere that physics, chemistry, biology and engineering intersect can benefit from nanotechnology.

This degree gives you knowledge of biochemistry, chemistry, mathematics, physics as well as nanotech subjects including nanomaterials and fabrication, synchrotron science and technology, and bionanotechnology.

Our focus on practical skills and experience means you’ll develop your own nanotech project in your final year as you complete your Master’s thesis, hosted by a leading research group or organisation, for example CSIRO. Fifth year also includes a study tour – in 2013 our students travelled to the Nano Tech Exhibition and Conference in Tokyo.

Our cadetship program provides work experience in industries like manufacturing, mining, pharmaceuticals and consulting. You can also take advantage of overseas study opportunities with our exchange partners in over 30 countries, and may be eligible for scholarships including the Ambassador Scholarships in Engineering and Mathematical Sciences and the Dean’s Scholarship for Academic Excellence.

TOEFL Paper-based Test – a minimum overall score of 550 with a score of 5 or more in the Test of Written English;

TOEFL Internet-based Test – a minimum overall score of 60 with a minimum for SLR 18; W 22;

Satisfactory completion of the English for Further Studies Advanced Stage 5B (EFS5 UG minimum 60 per cent) which is available from La Trobe Melbourne; for more information please visit the La Trobe Melbourne website.

La Trobe Melbourne Foundation Studies: 60 per cent final result in a course;

English as the language of instruction in tertiary studies may be accepted. Please note: English as the language of instruction in previous study will not be accepted as a basis of admission (English) for courses where the approved test score requirement is above an IELTS 6.5 with no band score lower than 6.0.

Pearson Test of English (Academic) (PTE): a minimum score of 57 with no communicative skill score less than 50.

Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): a grade of B or higher.

Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): a pass grade of C or higher;

or approved international equivalent.

If you do not meet these entry requirements you might be interested in La Trobe’s Foundation Studies and Diploma Programs, which provide an alternative pathway to La Trobe’s undergraduate program. For more information please visit the La Trobe Melbourne website.

The broad study of science and nanotechnology offers you many opportunities across the science-based industries, in research laboratories, and in the emerging global nanotechnology industries. Graduates are likely to find work in: – advanced materials – semiconductor and microelectronic technologies – advanced medical diagnostics – mineral processing – aerospace and defence industries – chemicals and polymer manufacture – surface coating technologies – government and private sector research laboratories.

A cross-disciplinary background means graduates can also look for opportunities in areas where the traditional sciences intersect.

Please apply through VTAC if youre completing your VCE or International Baccalaureate (IB) in Victoria, or apply through UAC if youre completing your HSC or IB in New South Wales.

Enquire now about any course for international students or find out how to apply.

Estimated fees for international students are indicated for each course above. Fees are indicative only and set at 120 credit points per course, unless otherwise stated, and may vary depending on the number of credit points in which students enrol. Some courses may vary in credit point load and fees will be adjusted accordingly.

There is also a range of scholarships available for international students to assist students.

Elana Montagner, Bachelor of Science (Honours) and Master of Nanotechnology

“La Trobe is an incredible university, filled with friendly and committed staff and wonderful people.”

The industry cadetship program allows you to gain paid workplace experience between semesters, giving you the chance to build on your skills and build your career.

Our students have travelled to the Nano Tech 2013 Exhibition and Conference in Tokyo on a study tour.

You can also gain valuable overseas experience by studying with one of our global exchange partners. La Trobe has partnerships with over 100 universities in more than 30 countries in Asia, Europe, and North and South America. See our international travel page for more information.

You’ll get to meet a large number of academic staff during your studies, from tutors through to lecturers and supervisors. View staff in Nanotechnology.

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nanotechnology – National Geographic Society

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on nanotechnology – National Geographic Society

administer Verb

to oversee, manage, or be in charge of.

(atomic force microscope)microscope that uses a tiny probe mounted on a cantilever to scan the surface of an object.

having a consistent, unusual, negative reaction to a substance.

one of several forms of a chemical element. Not all elements have allotropes.

translucent, yellow-orange material made of the resin of ancient trees. Amber is sometimes considered a gemstone.

predicting total, usually global, disaster.

to put together.

the basic unit of an element, composed of three major parts: electrons, protons, and neutrons.

to enlarge or add to.

(singular: bacterium) single-celled organisms found in every ecosystem on Earth.

process by which chemicals are absorbed by an organism, either from exposure to a substance with the chemical or by consumption of food containing the chemical.

(buckminsterfullerene) very stable form of carbon whose 60-atom structure looks like a geodesic dome.

growth of abnormal cells in the body.

structure that is fixed or supported at one end and free on the other.

substance that causes or quickens a chemical reaction, without being affected by it.

made of clay.

group of physical disorders that cause motor disability.

treatment of a disease (usually cancer) using drugs or other chemical agents toxic to the diseased cells and tissue.

natural chemical that helps regulate metabolism.

clearness or transparency.

process of changing from a liquid to a thickened or semi-solid mass.

dark, solid fossil fuel mined from the earth.

suspension in which particles of one substance are dispersed (suspended) in another substance.

able to transmit something, such as electricity or heat.

to use up.

hard, flexible metal (steel) with banded, wavy markings created by forging the metal in strips.

(singular: datum) information collected during a scientific study.

man-made molecule in which the atoms are arranged in branches radiating out from a central core. Also called an arborol or cascade molecule.

process of converting seawater to fresh water by removing salt and minerals.

having to do with the identification of an illness or disease.

type of crystal that is pure carbon and the hardest known natural substance.

liquid fuel (usually a type of petroleum) used to propel diesel engines. Also called diesel oil and diesel fuel.

a harmful condition of a body part or organ.

strong and long-lasting.

able to bend easily.

flow of electricity, or charged particles, through a conductor.

conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves a substance (or a vacuum) whose electrical characteristics are being measured.

study of the development and application of devices and systems involving the flow of electrons.

discharge or release.

person who plans the building of things, such as structures (construction engineer) or substances (chemical engineer).

glue or coating made from resins. Also called epoxy resin.

gases and particles expelled from an engine.

very costly.

to make or construct.

to remove particles from a substance by passing the substance through a screen or other material that catches larger particles and lets the rest of the substance pass through.

emission of light by a substance during exposure to another source of light.

coal, oil, or natural gas. Fossil fuels formed from the remains of ancient plants and animals.

system or order of a nation, state, or other political unit.

two-dimensional molecule of carbon arranged in a regular hexagonal (honeycomb-shaped) pattern.

soft, common allotrope of carbon that is the highest rank of coal. Also called black lead.

apocalyptic scenario where nanoscale robots malfunction and endlessly replicate themselves, consuming all matter on Earth.

iron-rich protein found in the red blood cells of many animals. In vertebrates, hemoglobin transports oxygen from the lungs to the body’s tissues, and transports carbon dioxide from the body’s tissues to the lungs.

shape having six sides.

event or symbol representing a belief, nation, or community.

unable to be pierced (penetrated) or understood.

having to do with the reaction of a tissue to irritation, injury, or infection.

structures and facilities necessary for the functioning of a society, such as roads.

something new.

deliberate or on-purpose.

to set one thing or organism apart from others.

glowing brightness.

type of blood cancer that occurs when white blood cells that help protect the body from infection and disease (lymphocytes) begin behaving abnormally.

to not work correctly.

production of goods or products in a factory.

having to do with the Middle Ages (500-1400) in Europe.

thin coating of material that certain substances, such as water, can pass through.

tiny organism, usually a bacterium.

small semiconductor with electrical circuits that carry information.

instrument used to view very small objects by making them appear larger.

study, design, and use of microscopes.

(metal matrix composite) compound with at least two parts, one being a metal.

smallest physical unit of a substance, consisting of two or more atoms linked together.

collection of tiny particles that acts as a binding agent to materials such as sand or plastics.

material made of different components and mixed at the nanometer-scale.

(nm) billionth of a meter.

material that has an average particle size of 1-100 nanometers.

length scale whose relevant unit of measurement is the nanometer (nm), or a billionth of a meter. Also called the nanoscopic scale.

development and study of technological function and devices on a scale of individual atoms and molecules.

hollow cylinder made of a single element, usually carbon.

(nanoceramic matrix composite) compound made of layered mineral particles, usually including a metal as another component. Also called nanoclay.

one of five awards established by the Swedish businessman Alfred Nobel in 1901. Nobel Prizes are awarded in physics, chemistry, medicine, literature, and peace.

having to do with facilities or resources located underwater, usually miles from the coast.

fossil fuel formed from the remains of marine plants and animals. Also known as petroleum or crude oil.

large, elevated structure with facilities to extract and process oil and natural gas from undersea locations.

having to do with vision or sight.

small piece of material.

five-sided shape.

able to convert solar radiation to electrical energy.

person who studies the relationship between matter, energy, motion, and force.

person who is among the first to do something.

expanding shell of superheated, glowing gas ejected from a dying star (red giant).

chemical material that can be easily shaped when heated to a high temperature.

(polymer nanocomposite) compound with nanoparticles dispersed within it.

introduction of harmful materials into the environment.

pots, vessels, or other material made from clay or ceramic.

happening before the expected time.

thin instrument for exploring the depth or other qualities of a material.

semiconductor whose electronic and optical characteristics are closely related to its size and shape. Also called a single-electron transistor.

to resist or push back.

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nanotechnology – National Geographic Society

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Nanotechnology and Plasma Technology – Deakin University

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nanotechnology and Plasma Technology – Deakin University

Nanotechnology research at Deakin University is focused on developing novel nanomaterials and using nanotechnology to solve some of today’s challenges in energy storage (batteries and supercapacitors), environmental protection and health and medical issues.

Plasma is an exciting, environmentally friendly way of shaping materials for scientific and industrial applications. Our research ranges from tailoring surfaces/interfaces, improving energy efficiency of solar cells and batteries, biomaterials, nanomaterials, sensors and nano-composites to food sterilisation, agriculture, wastewater treatment and electronic textiles.

The use of nanotechnology and nanomaterials are key approaches to improve the performance of energy storage technologies. We are using our experience in nanomaterials synthesis and applications to develop new electrode materials for batteries and supercapacitors. Some examples are: Li-ion batteries for electrical vehicles; nanostructured electrodes for Li-ion batteries; supercapacitors with high power density for energy storage and backup.

Nanotechnology research has a range of applications in areas as diverse as environmental protection and healthcare. Our research focuses on

Research in the area of one- and two-dimensional nanomaterials is advancing rapidly with potentially huge benefits for clean energy, environmental protection and medical sciences.

Our group has extensive research expertise in boron nitride nanotubes; synthesis of nanoparticles, nanotubes and nanowires, nanosheets and nanocomposites.

Desirable surfaces and interfaces are required for new materials.

Our focus has been on:

Liquid plasma is an exciting technology for applications in biomedicine, nanoscience, and agriculture. The challenge has been to achieve selectivity for the desired reactive species and efficient production of the required species in liquid for specific applications. We have developed a plasma gas bubble-in-liquid method using a nanosecond pulse generator with different gases and achieved high production of selectable reactive species. The new technology has been applied to milk sterilization, enhanced plant growth, wastewater treatment, and nanomaterial fabrication.

Our main focus has been on producing functional nano-semiconductors as electrodes to improve the efficiency of energy devices. We have developed a unique plasma+heat technology which combines plasma and thermal energy to fabricate doped functional nano-semiconductors. Several plasma sources have been designed to enable different types of nano-fabrication.

The challenges for producing stronger and lighter nano-composites are:

We have developed a stirring plasma technology to address the challenges of achieving uniform dispersion with a high density of functional groups and easy handling without affecting the structure of nanomaterials. We have also developed a novel plasma method that combines advantages of continuous wave plasma and pulsed plasma for surface functionalization of nanomaterials.

Our research in textile applications ranges from anti-pilling of wool knitwear, through electronic textiles, carbon fibre sizing, to super-hydrophobic textiles.

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Nanotechnology and Plasma Technology – Deakin University

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SUNY Poly Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering …

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on SUNY Poly Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering …

The Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering are the colleges of nanotechnology at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute campus in Albany, New York. Founded in 2004 and formerly a component of the University at Albany, the colleges underwent rapid expansion in the late-2000s and early-2010s before merging with the SUNY Institute of Technology in 2014. As two of five colleges within SUNY Poly, they are the first colleges in the United States devoted to nanotechnology.[1]

The Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering were originally established as the School of Nanosciences and Nanoengineering at the University at Albany in 2001. CNSE was accredited as the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering of the University at Albany in 2004, and in December of that year, awarded its first Ph.D. degrees in nanoscience.[2] In July 2013, SUNY’s Board of Trustees approved a memorandum that led to the separation of CNSE from the University at Albany and included the creation of a new degree-granting structure for the NanoCollege.[3] This was followed by the merger of the SUNY Institute of Technology (SUNYIT) with CNSE in September 2014 to create SUNY Polytechnic Institute.[4][5] In January 2015, Dr. Alain Kaloyeros was appointed by the SUNY Board of Trustees as the President of SUNY Poly.[6]

CNSE offers degree programs leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in Nanoscale Engineering and Nanoscale Science,[7] the Master of Science (M.S.) degree in either Nanoscale Science or Nanoscale Engineering, and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in either Nanoscale Science or Nanoscale Engineering. CNSE also offers a combined Masters of Science and Masters of Business Administration (M.S.-MBA) degree, the “Nano+MBA,” with the ability to earn the M.S. degree in either Nanoscale Science or Nanoscale Engineering,[8] or enroll in the nanotechnology elective track while participating in UAlbany’s Evening MBA program.[9] Additionally, CNSE and SUNY Downstate Medical Center offer a joint M.D. and Ph.D. program.[10] The program allows students to earn an M.D. in Medicine and a Ph.D. in Nanoscale Science or Engineering.[11] In 2010, CNSE became the first college in the U.S. to launch a comprehensive baccalaureate program in Nanoscale Engineering and Nanoscale Science.[12] Through the Spring 2013 semester, CNSE has 191 alumni.[13]

SUNY Poly CNSE is located near Western Avenue and Fuller Road, west of the University at Albany. The college has a number of wafer fabrication cleanrooms with different classifications for cleanroom suitability.

NanoFab 200, an earlier part of the campus, was completed in 1997. This 70,000-square-foot (6,500m2), $16.5 million facility includes 4,000 square feet (370m2) of cleanroom space, plus CNSE metrology labs and office space for programs such as SUNYs Atmospheric Sciences Research Center.

NanoFab South, completed March 2004, is a 150,000-square-foot (14,000m2), $50 million facility including 32,000 square feet (3,000m2) of 300mm wafer, class 1-capable cleanroom space.

Completed December 2005, NanoFab North is a 230,000-square-foot (21,000m2), $175 million facility including 35,000 square feet (3,300m2) of cleanroom space with Class 1-capable 300mm wafer production.

In March 2009, another $150 million expansion project included NanoFab East, a 250,000-square-foot (23,000m2) office, laboratory, and classroom building, in addition to NanoFab Central, a separate 100,000-square-foot (9,300m2) building that houses 15,000 square feet (1,400m2) of 300mm wafer, class 1-capable cleampus consists of NanoFab Xtension (NFX) which hosts the Global 450mm Consortium as well as an additional 50,000 square feet (4,600m2) of Class 1 capable cleanroom space, and the Zero Energy Nanotechnology (ZEN) building, a living laboratory for green energy technologies. The expansion will enable the addition of more than 1,000 scientists, researchers, and engineers from CNSE and global corporations.[14][15][16]

Located in Halfmoon, New York, the Solar Energy Development Center is an 18,000-square-foot (1,700m2) facility features a state-of-the-art, 100 kilowatt prototyping and demonstration line for next-generation copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) thin film solar cells, offering critical opportunities to demonstrate emerging concepts in CIGS manufacturing, such as evaluations of innovative materials and novel processes. CNSE’s SEDC also supports the U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium, a more than $300 million public-private collaboration headquartered at CNSE.[17]

Located in Kiernan Plaza the facility specializes in smart devices, sensors and computer chips, integrated systems, and operating software that collect and analyze data for monitoring highway conditions and improving traffic flow; protecting infrastructure such as bridges, data centers, and utility installations; safeguard facilities, including wastewater treatment plants; and provide e-safety and security in educational settings.[18]

The development of the Marcy Nanocenter site in Utica is led by CNSE in partnership with quasi-public Mohawk Valley EDGE to accelerate the attraction of 450mm computer chip manufacturing to the Mohawk Valley.[19] The development plan of the Marcy Nanocenter site includes up to 8.25 million square feet of teaching facilities, with up to three 450mm computer chip fabs, each with a cleanroom of approximately 450,000 square feet, a total public and private investment of $10B to $15B for each phase of development, and the creation of approximately 5,000 direct jobs and approximately 15,000 indirect jobs.[20]

The Computer Chip Commercialization Center, or Quad C, is located on the SUNY Poly Utica campus, and has an anchor tenant of General Electric.

Located in Syracuse, the Central New York Hub for Emerging Nano Industries specializes in providing visual production research and education to support New Yorks film and television industry, with a focus on the use of nanotechnology to drive innovations in computer-generated imagery and animation, as well as motion capture technology utilized by todays production facilities.[21] This initiative includes a minimum private investment of $150M over seven years. SUNY Poly will provide $15M to build the facility at the Collamer Crossings Business Park in Dewitt, and Onondaga County has invested $1.4M to ensure shovel-ready status for the two 52,000 square foot buildings, offering research and development, manufacturing, and office space for a diverse cross-section of businesses, including The Film House, a California-based film and television company, which will be the facilitys first tenant.[22] As announced by Andrew Cuomo in March 2014, the project will create at least 350 new jobs and 150 construction jobs.[23]

located in Rochester, NY, will invest over $500 million and create thousands of high-skilled, high-paying jobs in Upstate New York over the next five years including at least 500 in Rochester.[24] This public-private partnership will help develop the next generation of materials used on semiconductors at State-owned R&D facilities.[25] Managed by CNSE, the development of this next generation of semiconductors will enable power devices to get smaller, faster and more efficient.[23]

located outside of Rochester in Canandaigua, New York, was created in 2010 through a merger of two of New York State’s Centers of Excellence: Infotonics Technology Center (ITC) in Canandaigua and the Center of Excellence in Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology at CNSE, and offers state-of-the-art capabilities for MEMS fabrication and packaging at its 120,000-square-foot (11,000m2) facility that includes 26,000 square feet (2,400m2) of certified cleanroom space with 150mm and 200mm MEMS foundry services, complemented by a dedicated 8,000-square-foot (740m2) MEMS and optoelectronic packaging facility.[26] The STC positions New York State as a global leader in smart system and smart device innovation and manufacturing[27][28] and also positions CNSE as a vertically integrated “one-stop-shop” for smart systems’ device development and process manufacturing, coupling CNSE’s preeminence in nanoelectronics R&D with ITC’s expertise in integrating computer chips with hundreds of mechanical devices.[27]

to be located inside a 57,000-square-foot (5,300m2) former Kodak building in the Canal Ponds Business Park in Rochester, New York, is part of a taxpayer-funded $100 million initiative creating the solar industrys first full-service collaborative space dedicated to advancing crystalline silicon, technologies.[29][30][31] Further leveraging the publicly led industry-university partnership model utilized at CNSE, the CNSE MDF will include a state-of-the-art, 20,000-square-foot (1,900m2) cleanroom instruction center and will provide a range of services and equipment, including complete manufacturing lines, access to individual tools, secure fab space for users proprietary tools, and pilot production services in an intellectual property (IP) secure environment.[32][33] Over $19 million in cutting-edge tools and equipment that are critical to the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) SunShot initiative and which were formerly utilized by SVTC, a Silicon Valley-based solar energy company, will be relocated to the CNSE MDF to constitute the foundation of the manufacturing development line.[32][34] The CNSE MDF will also enable education and training to support the expansion of the highly skilled workforce required by the U.S. PV manufacturing industry and, in addition, will complement and expand the capabilities and expertise of the national U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium (PVMC), headquartered at CNSE as part of the DOEs SunShot Initiative.[34][35]

Located at the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus in Buffalo, the Buffalo Medical Innovation and Commercialization Hub is a facility for research, development, and testing for drug screening, pharmaceutical development, technology optimization, business attraction, workforce training, and bioinformatics.[36] This $250 million initiative, with $200 million to be generated by private industry investment and $50 million being invested by New York State, $35 million of which will go toward new equipment and $15 million of which will go toward improving existing lab space, will support over 250 jobs on site.[37]

In 2014, SolarCity invested $5 billion to establish a one million-square-foot factory which will produce solar panels, at the Buffalo High-Tech Manufacturing Innovation Hub at RiverBend, the former site of a Republic Steel factory.[38] It will be the largest facility of its kind in the Western Hemisphere, with more than 1 gigawatt of annual solar capacity when it reaches full production.[citation needed] More than 3,000 jobs will be created in Western New York and a total of nearly 5,000 jobs throughout New York.[citation needed]

The Buffalo Information Technologies Innovation and Commercialization Hub was created through a $55 million investment by New York. IBM will be the first anchor tenant in the hub and will train information technology professionals and develop software needed in the areas of molecular research, genomics, energy efficiency and defense. Through the hub, IBM will bring 500 new information technology jobs to Buffalo.[39]

CNSE is the home of numerous pioneering nanotechnology programs funded by a variety of public and private sources. CNSE is able to accelerate the commercialization of technologies by providing technology deployment, market development, economic outreach and business assistance under a variety of centers and programs.

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Nanomedicine Fact Sheet

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nanomedicine Fact Sheet

Nanomedicine Overview

What if doctors had tiny tools that could search out and destroy the very first cancer cells of a tumor developing in the body? What if a cell’s broken part could be removed and replaced with a functioning miniature biological machine? Or what if molecule-sized pumps could be implanted in sick people to deliver life-saving medicines precisely where they are needed? These scenarios may sound unbelievable, but they are the ultimate goals of nanomedicine, a cutting-edge area of biomedical research that seeks to use nanotechnology tools to improve human health.

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A lot of things are small in today’s high-tech world of biomedical tools and therapies. But when it comes to nanomedicine, researchers are talking very, very small. A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter, too small even to be seen with a conventional lab microscope.

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Nanotechnology is the broad scientific field that encompasses nanomedicine. It involves the creation and use of materials and devices at the level of molecules and atoms, which are the parts of matter that combine to make molecules. Non-medical applications of nanotechnology now under development include tiny semiconductor chips made out of strings of single molecules and miniature computers made out of DNA, the material of our genes. Federally supported research in this area, conducted under the rubric of the National Nanotechnology Initiative, is ongoing with coordinated support from several agencies.

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For hundreds of years, microscopes have offered scientists a window inside cells. Researchers have used ever more powerful visualization tools to extensively categorize the parts and sub-parts of cells in vivid detail. Yet, what scientists have not been able to do is to exhaustively inventory cells, cell parts, and molecules within cell parts to answer questions such as, “How many?” “How big?” and “How fast?” Obtaining thorough, reliable measures of quantity is the vital first step of nanomedicine.

As part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund [nihroadmap.nih.gov], the NIH [nih.gov] has established a handful of nanomedicine centers. These centers are staffed by a highly interdisciplinary scientific crew, including biologists, physicians, mathematicians, engineers and computer scientists. Research conducted over the first few years was spent gathering extensive information about how molecular machines are built.

Once researchers had catalogued the interactions between and within molecules, they turned toward using that information to manipulate those molecular machines to treat specific diseases. For example, one center is trying to return at least limited vision to people who have lost their sight. Others are trying to develop treatments for severe neurological disorders, cancer, and a serious blood disorder.

The availability of innovative, body-friendly nanotools that depend on precise knowledge of how the body’s molecular machines work, will help scientists figure out how to build synthetic biological and biochemical devices that can help the cells in our bodies work the way they were meant to, returning the body to a healthier state.

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Last Updated: January 22, 2014

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Nanomedicine Fact Sheet

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SMART Surgery Technique – Samadi Modified Advanced Robotic …

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on SMART Surgery Technique – Samadi Modified Advanced Robotic …

SMART Surgery Technique (Samadi Modified Advanced Robotic Technique)

Having completed fellowship training in both urologic oncology and laparoscopy, Dr Samadis technique as described below builds on oncologic principles learned with open radical prostatectomy and transferred to a robotic approach. In the technique he uses at Lenox Hill Hospital, he recreates the classic open anatomic RRP technique as closely as possible on the robotic platform. He does not view the robot as a good unto itself, but, rather, as a tool that permits enhanced anatomic radical prostatectomy by improving vision and allowing angles of dissection not possible with open or straight laparoscopic instruments.

It should be emphasized that the SMART technique is an advanced technique that should not be performed early in a novice robotic surgeons learning curve. Since 2003, Dr Samadi has performed over 2,000 RALPs, approximately half by this technique. In the 12 months since the final modifications were made to this technique in early 2008, he has performed more than 2,224 RALPs. We are able to achieve continence rates of 97% and potency rates of 81% at 1 year (in 193 and 169 patients, respectively) while maintaining a 4% rate of positive surgical margins.

The medial umbilical ligaments are coagulated and tran transected bilaterally and the incision is carried down to the vasa deferentia. The space of Retzius is developed bluntly. Fat on the anterior surface of the prostate is excised and included with the permanent prostate specimen. This fat is sent for pathologic analysis after recent findings demonstrated that it occasionally harbors lymph nodes, which, when positive, portend poor prognosis (Urology 2007; 70:1000-3).

Once the prostate is exposed, the bladder neck is identified and the medial aspect of the bladder neck incised with electrocautery until the Foley catheter is exposed. The catheter is grasped with the fourth robotic arm and retracted anteriorly. Note that the endopelvic fascia remains intact at this point and the DVC is not ligated (figure 1).

The posterior aspect of the bladder is now exposed and a median lobe or TUR defect should be apparent, if present. (Management of median lobes can be quite complex, and is outside the scope of this discussion.) The posterior aspect of the bladder neck is transected with electrocautery, while keeping in the same plane as the anterior bladder neck dissection.

Given the proximity of the nervi erigentes of Walsh to the tips of the seminal vesicles, their dissection should be performed without cautery. The vas deferens is dissected several centimeters distally, which facilitates the delivery of the remainder of the SV. Once in the correct plane and the glistening white of the vas is exposed, the thin layer of connective tissue covering the SV is bluntly dissected posteriorly as the SV is pulled anteriorly. After the entirety of the SV has been exposed, the artery to the SV should be seen entering laterally, where it is clipped distally and transected. We prefer the articulation afforded by the robotic Hem-o-lok clip applier (Weck Closure Systems, Research Triangle Park, NC). Once one SV has been dissected, it is retracted anteriorly to facilitate the dissection of the contralateral SV.

Following dissection of bilateral SVs, the SVs are grasped with the fourth robotic arm, retracted superio-laterally, and rotated away from the side of nerve sparing (to the left and counter-clockwise for right-sided nerve sparing). Minimal traction is thus placed on the neurovascular bundles (figure 2). It should be emphasized that from this point onward, all dissection and nerve sparing are performed with blunt dissection, using the curved robotic scissors. No cautery is used at any point. (In the event of significant disease burden prohibitive of nerve sparing, the neurovascular bundle is excised widely with a standard lateral incision of the endopelvic fascia.)

The posterior aspect of the prostate is dissected bluntly in antegrade fashion for several centimeters and the prostatic pedicle is exposed. The large urethral branches are controlled using a robotically applied Hem-o-lok clip (figure 3). Starting at the lateral aspect of the SV, interfascial nerve sparing is performed in an antegrade fashion from the 5 oclock to the 2 oclock position on the prostate, similar to the veil or curtain technique. Small capsular branches of the pedicle are controlled with small metal clips applied robotically.

Care should be taken to visualize the ureteric orifices prior to reconstruction and to avoid their inclusion in the sutures. Once the endopelvic fascia has been released anteriorly for several centimeters at the 2 oclock position, a robotically applied Hem-o-lok clip is placed on the lateral fascia parallel with the plane of dissection to control tributaries of the DVC. The fascia is then incised with the cold scissors. This proceeds in an antegrade fashion until the apex is dissected and the DVC exposed (figure 4). The fourth robotic arm is then shifted to the right side and rotated in a clockwise fashion to set up the left-sided nerve sparing.

After both neurovascular bundles have been spared to the apex, the pneumoperitoneum is temporarily increased to 20 mm Hg. The anesthesiologist is instructed to carefully monitor end tidal CO2. The DVC and puboprostatic ligaments are cut with cold scissors as the prostate is retracted superiorly and rotated anteriorly as in open RRP. The apex of the prostate, urethra, and neurovascular bundles can easily be visualized and dissected free (figure 5). Minimal suction is used during this step to minimize blood loss from the open DVC. The urethra is dissected circumferentially and cut with cold scissors to leave as long a urethral stump as possible, maintaining the striated sphincter.

After the specimen is removed and bagged, the DVC is oversewn with a running 3-0 polyglactin suture on an SH needle, taking care to avoid the dissected neurovascular bundles.Arterial and venous bleeding is easily controlled with this suture, without distorting the anatomy of the urethra or sphincter. The pneumoperitoneum is returned to 15 mm Hg as soon as possible. Blood loss for this portion of the procedure is rarely more than 50 mL. Arteries are often present at the 11 and 1 oclock position, which can be coagulated with bipolar cautery if bleeding is excessive. In the rare instance when bleeding is excessive, the DVC can be oversewn in running fashion prior to removal of the specimen.

The bladder neck is reconstructed with a posterior tennis-racquet closure with a running 2- 0 polyglactin suture on a CT needle, as described for open RRP (figure 6). Care should be taken to visualize the ureteric orifices prior to reconstruction and to avoid their inclusion in the sutures. The bladder neck is narrowed to the caliber of an 18F catheter. Fat on the anterior surface of the prostate occasionally harbors lymph nodes, which when positive portend poor prognosis.

Using the technique of van Velthoven, two 3-0 Monocryl sutures on UR-6 needles of different colors are tied together and run cirumferentially around the urethro-vesical anastomosis. The exaggerated curve of the UR needle facilitates accurate placement of sutures in the reconstructed bladder neck. We do not advocate the use of posterior fascial reconstruction prior to the anastomosis because randomized evidence has demonstrated its inefficacy (J Urol 2008; 180:1018-23).

Shocked by the diagnosis, I started researching different types of prostate cancer treatments in the Internet. In the faraway Moscow I found your website http://www.roboticoncology-rus.com, saw your photo and almost immediately, on the subconscious level made my choice only you, Dr. David Samadi, can save my life. My family and I never regret this decision.

Nel mese di ottobre 2008 mi stato dignosticato un tumore alla prostata. All’et di 43 anni non facile gestire una notizia di questo tipo, sia sul piano fisico che sul piano psicologico. Mi sono rivolto al dottor David Samadi e dal momento che sono entrato nel suo ufficio, subito ho capito, grazie alla sua positivita` sicurezza e professionalita`, che ero nelle mani giuste.

Recibir la noticia de cancer a la prostata fue un golpe duro y dificil de aceptar, porque de solo nombrar la palabra CANCER, se asocia con algo terminal, lo cierto es que si el cancer es detectado a tiempo y con un tratamiento adecuado las posibilidades de cura son muy alentadoras. Sin otra alternativa que la de aceptar mi realidad, decido buscar la mayor informacion posible al respecto.

Just over a year ago on December 22, 2008 I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. In the midst of receiving this traumatic news, I was forced to decide on treatment from a bewildering array of options, from watch and wait, to radiation, to high frequency ultrasound, to conventional surgery, to laparoscopic surgery. More than all that, the choice foreshadowed long waiting lines, crowded hospitals and…

2010, : PSA -4.9, – 6 (3+3). , . PSA , .( 5.22, 4.96, 5.76, 6.16 )

2010 -PSA -6.3 2010 – 7 (4+3).

We could not believe we could get an appointment with you so quickly. We liked your answer very much. No one touches my patients but me. At that moment, we knew we had found our surgeon. We have never regretted that decision for a single moment. You and your staff have a level of knowledge, experience and professionalism that is unparalleled.

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Washington Robotic Surgery for Prostate and Kidney Cancer

§ November 3rd, 2015 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Washington Robotic Surgery for Prostate and Kidney Cancer

welcome

Dr. Bart Radolinski,Dr. Juan Litvak, and Dr. Mark Rosenblum are board-certified urologists specializing in robotic surgery. Along with Dr. Murray Lieberman,Dr. Niz Maruf, and Dr. Kathleen Sterling, they are part of Urological Consultants, and they are dedicated to providing quality, compassionate urology care to patients in Montgomery County, Maryland, and Washington, DC.

Washington Robotic Surgery was created to help inform patients with kidney and prostate cancer of their robotic surgical treatment options. Pleasecontact us with any questions you might have or to schedule an appointment.

Referred to by many as robotic surgery for prostate cancer or kidney cancer,da Vinci prostatectomy and da Vinci partial nephrectomy are more accurately described as robot-assisted, minimally invasive (laparoscopic) surgeries that are quickly becoming the preferred treatment for removal of prostate and kidney cancer following early diagnosis (more)

Since helping to establish the robotic surgery program atSuburban Hospital in 2008, Dr. Litvak and Dr. Radolinski have focused on developing a personalized, team-oriented approach to the care of their patients. (more)

For any questions, or to schedule an appointment with one of our robotic surgeons, please contact us at 301-530-1700. You can meet with us at either our Bethesda or Germantown locations in Maryland. A member of our staff will help guide you through the process of making your visit as rewarding as possible.

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IBM100 – Nanotechnology

§ October 31st, 2015 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on IBM100 – Nanotechnology

Can a tiny structure, 10,000 times thinner than a human hair, provide us with the answers to the worlds greatest challenges? Scientists at IBM think the answer is yes.

Nano comes from the Greek word for dwarf and broadly speaking, the field of nanotechnology can be defined as research and technology developments at the atomic or molecular level. Researchers in nanotechnology seek to understand and control some of the smallest objects known to humankind.

In terms of length, one nanometer is the equivalent of about four gold atoms or one millionth of a millimeter. Or to use an analogy, the diameter of an atom compares to the diameter of an orange as the orange compares to the Earth.

As the world becomes more instrumented, with billions of transistors embedded in everything from cars to appliances to livestock, nanotechnology will play an increasingly important role in the design of future computer chips that are smaller, smarter and more energy efficient.

To achieve these performance goals, sophisticated nanotechnology processes are needed to fabricate these increasingly small transistors. Just as cells are the basic building blocks for the human body, IBM envisions a world in which nanotechnology processes are the basic building blocks for transistors and microprocessors. IBM scientists are exploring the use of new materials, such as semiconducting nanowires, to improve the fundamental design of transistors, which is more than 50 years old.

IBM Research opened the door to the world of nanoscience in 1981 when Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer invented the scanning tunneling microscope, revolutionizing our ability to manipulate solid surfaces the size of atoms. [Read more about the Icon of Progress, Scanning Tunneling Microscope]. And since that time, IBM has achieved breakthrough upon breakthrough in the field.

In 1993, NEC researcher Sumio Iijima and IBM researcher Donald S. Bethune had independently discovered a unique new form of carbon called single-walled carbon nanotubes, which can behave like metals or semiconductors, can conduct electricity better than copper, can transmit heat better than diamond, and rank among the strongest materials known.*

Then in 1998, an individual carbon nanotube was made into a transistor by a groupwhich included Phaedon Avouris, who later joined IBMin Delft, Netherlands, and by a team at IBM. IBM continued the work and demonstrated that nanotubes could potentially scale up as building blocks for the future of electronics.

In 2001, this IBM team, led by Dr. Avouris, who had become manager of nanoscale science at IBM Research in Yorktown Heights, NY, devised the first transistors using arrays of carbon nanotubes. Nanotubes conduct electricity at rates that are approximately 70 times higher than silicon. Avouris team, which included Vincent Derycke, Richard Martel and Joerg Appenzeller, also succeeded in integrating the carbon nanotubes with existing chip-making technologies. Later that year, the IBM researchers announced they had built the worlds first circuit using an individual carbon nanotube that could perform a basic logic operation.

In 2002, IBM Research scientists proved that transistors based on carbon nanotubes could switch on and off faster and use less energy than current transistors etched into silicon chips. And most recently, IBM Research scientists in Zurich, Switzerland, have been able to capture an image of the anatomyor chemical structureinside a molecule with unprecedented resolution.

Though not an exact comparison, if you think about how a doctor uses an X-ray to image bones and organs inside the human body, we are using the atomic force microscope to image the atomic structures that are the backbones of individual molecules, said IBM researcher Gerhard Meyer. Scanning probe techniques offer amazing potential for prototyping complex functional structures and for tailoring and studying their electronic and chemical properties on the atomic scale.

Today, interest in carbon electronics has expanded to include transistors and circuits made with graphene, a single atom-thick layer of carbon atoms bonded in a hexagonal honeycomb-like arrangement. In 2010, Avouris team at IBM demonstrated the worlds fastest graphene transistor, capable of switching at a rate of 100 billion times a second, or 100 gigahertz. Most recently, this team produced the first graphene-integrated circuit, a radio-frequency mixer. (A mixer is used in radios and other communications equipment to switch a signal up or down to another frequency.) The same team applied graphene in optoelectronics and demonstrated the use of a single atomic layer of graphene to reliably detect optical data streams at rates of 10 gigabits per second. Graphene has many advantages because it can be used as a universalmeaning it has very wide wavelength rangephotodetector. Graphene also has an ultrafast response and is inexpensive.

The benefits of nanotechnology, however, extend beyond electronics. Nanoscale systems are already being tested by different companies to improve solar energy, water purification and desalination in the emerging markets, and to enable faster and more accurate healthcare diagnostic toolssuch as the IBM DNA Transistor [read more about this Icon of Progress]which offers a potential high-tech, low-cost method for reading the human genome sequence.

The most recent development in applying nanoscience to medicine is the development of a potential weapon against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an easily contracted form of Staph infection, which causes tens of thousands of hospital-stay deaths in the United States every year. When the Staph bacteria develops resistance to antibiotics, it can be deadly. IBM researchers have discovered a potential breakthrough method of treatment in which nanostructures are able to detect and destroy the antibiotic-resistant bacteria while leaving the healthy cells intact. Scientists used principles from semiconductor manufacturing and found that certain polymers can locate bacteria and break through the bacterial cell wall and membrane. When the membrane is destroyed, the cells are unable to mutate into antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The nanostructures, when finished fighting the bacteria, biodegrade in the body and are eliminated. While still experimental, using nanotechnology in this way could be a potential breakthrough in how to treat this disease.

With all of this potential, its no surprise that nanotechnology is attracting increasing attention from all over the world, and governments from the United States to Switzerland to Jordan to China are all investing in the science. IBM extended its commitment to the future of nanotechnology research and innovations in May 2011 with the opening of the Binnig and Rohrer Nanotechnology Center on the IBM Research campus in Zurich. The Center is a unique collaboration with ETH Zurich, a premier European science and engineering university.

* Citation to Sumio Iijima and Donald S. Bethune, James C. McGroddy Prize for New Materials, American Physical Society, March 2002

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Dr. Jon Dounchis, M.D. – Robotic Knees

§ October 23rd, 2015 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Dr. Jon Dounchis, M.D. – Robotic Knees

Robotic Knee Partial Replacement

Robotic and computer-assisted technology assists the surgeon to resurface only the damaged portion of the knee.

This: preserves the normal ligaments and unaffected cartilage surfaces (resulting in a more natural feeling knee),

is more conservative than total knee arthroplasty,

and is often outpatient surgery with a short recovery period.

Technique:

A CT-scan is taken of the knee to create a detailed 3-D model.

The position of the resurfacing components is idealized on the computer.

The surgeon then uses the robotic arm to precisely prepare and place the components.

Robotic Hip Total Replacement

Robotic and computer-assisted technology assists the surgeon to precisely prepare and place the hip replacement components (ball, socket, stem).

This: maximizes the stability of the hip (reduced dislocation rates),

improves the wearing of the components (akin to having a well-aligned car tire),

and facilitates correct leg-length.

Technique:

A CT-scan is taken of the hip to create a detailed 3-D model.

The position of the components (ball, socket, stem) is idealized on the computer.

The surgeon then uses the robotic arm to precisely prepare and place the components.

Jon Dounchis, M.D. 2010 All rights reserved.

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Nanomedicine – Wikiversity

§ October 21st, 2015 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nanomedicine – Wikiversity

Dr SHOEB MUSTAFA, DEPT. OF MICROBIOLOGY, J.N.MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL,A.M.U, ALIGARH E MAIL:SHOEBMUSTAFA82@INDIATIMES.COM

Nanomedicine is the medical application of nanotechnology. It covers areas such as nanoparticle drug delivery and possible future applications of molecular nanotechnology (MNT) and nanovaccinology. The most important innovations are taking place in drug delivery which involves developing nanoscale particles or molecules to improve bioavailability. In vivo imaging is another area where tools and devices are being developed. Using nanoparticle contrast agents, images such as ultrasound and MRI have a favorable distribution and improved contrast. The new therapies and surgeries that are being developed might be effective in treating illnesses and diseases such as cancer.

Nanopharmocology is the use of nanotechnology for pharmacology applications such as: the formation of novel nanoscopic entities [1], exploring and matching specific compounds to particular patients for maximum effectiveness; and advanced pharmaceutical delivery systems and discovery of new pharmacological molecular entities; selection of pharmaceuticals for specific individuals to maximize effectiveness and minimize side effects (2), and delivery of pharmaceuticals to targeted locations or tissues within the body. Nanoparticles can render targeted and sustained delivery of biological compounds to specific tissues with a minimum of systemic side effects.

Nanoparticles have unusual properties that can be used to improve drug delivery. Whereas larger particles would have been cleared from the body, cells take up these nanoparticles because of their size. The particulates from drug delivery systems lower the volume of distribution and reduce the effect on non-target tissue. Development of completely new drugs with more useful behavior and less side effects.

Nanocapsule, means sandy nanoparticle that consists of a shell and a space, in which desired substances may be placed. Drug-filled nanocapsules can be covered with antibodies or cell-surface receptors that bind to cancer or various cells and release their biological compound on contact with that tissue. Nanocapsules have been made using molecules called phospholipids, which are hydrophobic (water-repellant) on one end and hydrophilic (water-loving) on the other. When such molecules are placed in an aqueous environment, they can spontaneously form capsules in which the hydrophobic portions are inside (3), protecting them from contact with water.The walls of our cells are in fact made up of a double layer of such molecules. Inside the cells, similar capsules, called liposomes (literally, fat bodies), are used to transport material.

Nanotechnology chips with biosensors can find genes, guide drug discovery, monitor body functioning, and identify biologic and chemical pathogens. As nanotechnology and genetics advance, medibots and engineered beneficial microorganisms may be integrated into nanomedibots. Nanomedibots will be used to diagnosis and treat healing conditions that resist diagnosis and curing by current biomedical research. Medibots are robots or robotic systems that provide physicians with greater flexibility, precision of motion, and/or remote procedure capability in the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Concerning macro-scale medibots (4), improvements in the conveyance of visual and directional information with sophisticated consoles and remote-controlled hardware are already enabling surgeons to conduct an increasing array of surgical procedures in a minimally invasive manner.

1. Nanoparticles of cadmium selenide (quantum dots) glow when exposed to ultraviolet light. When injected, they seep into cancer tumors. The surgeon can see the glowing tumor, and use it as a guide for more accurate tumor removal. 2. Sensor test chips containing thousands of nanowires, able to detect proteins and other biomarkers left behind by cancer cells, could enable the detection and diagnosis of cancer in the early stages from a few drops of a patient’s blood. [5] 3. Researchers at Rice University have demonstrated the use of 120nm diameter nanoshells coated with gold to kill cancer tumors in mice. The nanoshells can be targeted to bond to cancerous cells by conjugating antibodies or peptides to the nanoshell surface. By irradiating the area of the tumor with an infrared laser, which passes through flesh without heating it, the gold is heated sufficiently to cause death to the cancer cells [6]. 4. Dendrimer molecule has over a hundred hooks on it that allow it to attach to cells in the body for a variety of purposes. These molecules have also shown potential for targeted chemotherapy against tumor cells.

At Rice University, a flesh welder is used to fuse two pieces of chicken meat into a single piece. The two pieces of chicken are placed together touching. A greenish liquid containing gold-coated nanoshells is dribbled along the seam. An infrared laser is traced along the seam, causing the two sides to weld together. This could solve the difficulties and blood leaks caused when the surgeon tries to restitch the arteries he/she has cut during a kidney or heart transplant. The flesh welder could meld the artery into a perfect seal.

Arthrobotics is the application of robotic technology to help orthopedic surgeons in the healing, repair, and replacement of joint-related conditions. Current applications of arthrobotics involve arthroscopic automation and place enhancements, such as automated motion of the arthroscope, position sensors to guide it, and force sensors for tissue proximity control. Future arthrobotic usages might incorporate complete joint replacement with bionic bionics and neuro-computer interfaces for limb control from neural impulses in the brain.

Nanodevices could be observed at work inside the body using MRI, using mostly 13C atoms rather than the natural 12C isotope of carbon, since 13C has a nonzero nuclear magnetic moment. Medical nanodevices would first be injected into a human body, and would then go to work in a specific organ or tissue mass. The doctor will monitor the progress, and make certain that the nanodevices have gotten to the correct target treatment region. The doctor can actually see the nanodevices congregate around their target (a tumor mass, etc.). Tracking movement can help determine how well drugs are being distributed or how substances are metabolized.

There are somewhat speculative claims that using nanorobots [7] [8] in medicine, would totally change the world of medicine once it is realized. Nanomedicine [9] [10] would make use of these nanorobots, introduced into the body, to repair or detect damages and infections. According to Robert Freitas of the Institute for Molecular Manufacturing, a typical blood borne medical nanorobot would be between 0.5-3 micrometres in size, because that is the maximum size possible due to capillary passage requirement. Carbon would be the primary element used to build these nanorobots due to the inherent strength and other characteristics of some forms of carbon (diamond/fullerene composites), and nanorobots would be fabricated in desktop nanofactories [11] specialized for this purpose. Nanorobots could counter the problem of identifying and isolating cancer cells as they could be introduced into the bloodstream. These nanorobots would search out cancer affected cells using certain molecular markers. Medical nanorobots would then destroy these cells, and only these cells. Nanomedicines could be a very helpful and hopeful therapy for patients, since current treatments like radiation therapy and chemotherapy often end up destroying more healthy cells than cancerous ones. Nanorobots could also be useful in precision tissue- and cell-targeted drug delivery [12] [13], in performing nanosurgery [14], and in treatments for hypoxemia and respiratory illness[15] [16], dentistry [17] [18], bacteremic infections[19], physical trauma [20], gene therapy via chromosome replacement therapy [21] [22], and even biological aging [23].

Some possible applications using nanorobots are as follows: To cure skin diseases, a cream containing nanorobots may be used. A mouthwash full of smart nanomachines could identify and destroy pathogenic bacteria while allowing normal commensals to grow. Medical nanodevices could augment the immune system by finding and disabling unwanted bacteria and viruses just like leucocyte. Devices working in the bloodstream could nibble away at arteriosclerosis deposits, widening the affected blood vessels. Cell herding devices could restore artery walls and artery linings to prevent most heart attacks.

Neuro-electronic interfaces are a visionary goal dealing with the construction of nanodevices that will permit computers to be joined and linked to the nervous system. This idea requires the building of a molecular structure that will permit control and detection of nerve impulses by an external computer. The computers will be able to interpret, register, and respond to signals the body gives off when it feels sensations. The demand for such structures is huge because many diseases involve the decay of the nervous system (ALS and multiple sclerosis). Also, many injuries and accidents may impair the nervous system resulting in dysfunctional systems and paraplegia. If computers could control the nervous system through neuro-electronic interface, problems that impair the system could be controlled so that effects of diseases and injuries could be overcome. PROSPECTS: Treatment of paraplegia, hemiplegia and spondylosis following accidental injuries, vascular and due to other causes.

Using drugs and surgery, doctors can only encourage tissues to repair themselves. With molecular machines, there will be more direct repairs. The possibilities of these cell repair machines are impressive. Comparable to the size of viruses or bacteria, their compact parts will allow them to be more complex. As they open and close cell membranes or travel through tissue and enter cells and viruses, machines will only be able to correct a single molecular disorder like DNA damage or enzyme deficiency. Nanocomputers will be needed to guide these machines. These computers will direct machines to examine, take apart, and rebuild damaged molecular structures.

An example of the state of the nanobiotechnological art is Tejal Desai’s(Boston University) artificial pancreas. Dr. Desai has encased her mouse pancreatic cells in a membrane studded with “nanopores” a mere seven nanometres across. As glucose from the blood washes in through the nanopores (25), the enclosed islet cells respond by releasing insulin. At 7 nanometres, the pores are big enough to allow the passage of glucose and insulin,but antibodies, which are significantly larger, cannot squeeze through, and so cannot damage the islet cells.

Artificial muscles have been made from millions of carbon nanotubes. Like natural muscles, providing an electrical charge causes the individual fibres to expand and the whole structure to move (26). An artificial muscle with strength and speed equal to that of a human muscle may soon be possible. A new wave of technology and medicine is being created and its impact on the world is going to be monumental. From the possible applications such as drug delivery and in vivo imaging to the potential machines of the future, advancements in nanomedicine are being made every day.

Novel photon correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence-based techniques allow the visualization of single biomolecules such as specific proteins, enzymes, hormones, nucleic acids, and so on, in living cells and tissues.[2]

J Nanosci Nanotechnol. 2006 Sep-Oct;6(9-10):2769-75.

Nanoscience and NanotechnologyVol.6,2769-2775 2006 14.International Journal of Surgery (2005) – , – e -www.int-journal-surgery.com 15Freitas RA.Exploratory design in medical nanotechnology: a mechanical artificial red cell. Artif Cells Blood Substit Immobil Biotechnol. 1998 Jul;26(4):411-30. PMID: 9663339 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE] 16.http://www.foresight.org/Nanomedicine/Respirocytes. 17 Nanodentistry.Freitas RA.Zyvex Corp., Richardson, Texas 75081, USA J Am Dent Assoc. 2000 Nov;131(11):1559-65. 18 Robert A. Freitas Jr., Nanodentistry, J. Amer. Dent. Assoc. 131(November 2000):1559-1566. (Cover story) 19 Robert A. Freitas Jr., Journal of Evolution and Technology – Vol. 14 – April 2005 http://jetpress.org/volume14/freitas.html 20 IMM Report Number 18: Nanomedicine In conjunction with Foresight Update 41 Clottocytes: Artificial Mechanical Platelets ByRobertA.Freitas Jr. Research Scientist, Zyvex LLC 21 The future of nanofabrication and molecular scale devices in nanomedicine.Freitas RA. Zyvex Corp, Richardson, Texas, USA Stud Health Technol Inform. 2002;80:45-59 22 The Future of Nanofabrication and Molecular Scale Devices in Nanomedicine Robert A. Freitas Jr.,Research Scientist, Zyvex Corp.published July 2002 http://www.rfreitas.com/Nano/FutureNanofabNMed.htm 23 Death Is An Outrage Robert A. Freitas Jr. Lecture delivered by the author at the Fifth Alcor Conference on Extreme Life Extension, 16 November 2002, Newport Beach, CA, http://www.rfreitas.com/Nano/DeathIsAnOutrage. 24. Robert F. Jr. Nanotechnology Magazine 2 (1996) 8. Robert F. Jr. Artificial Cells 26 (1998) 411. 25. http://www.pnl.gov/energyscience/06-01/ws.htm 26. http://www.mondolithic.com

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UNSW Handbook Program – Nanotechnology – 3617

§ October 21st, 2015 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on UNSW Handbook Program – Nanotechnology – 3617

Faculty:Faculty of Science

Contact:http://www.science.unsw.edu.au

Campus:Kensington Campus

Career:Undergraduate

Typical Duration:4 Years

Typical UOC Per Semester:24

Min UOC Per Semester:3

Max UOC Per Semester:27

Min UOC For Award:192

UAC Code:429011

ATAR:87

International Entry Requirements:See International Entry Requirements

Award(s):

Bachelor of Science (Major)

Information valid for students commencing 2013. Students who commenced prior to 2013 should go to the Handbook’s Previous Editions

The Bachelor of Science (Nanotechnology) at UNSW is a multidisciplinary degree taught by the three Schools of Chemistry, Physics and Materials Science and Engineering. The degree is administered by the School of Chemistry, but all schools have a strong input and courses are also hosted by the School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences.

No other degree program at UNSW provides the breadth of study in science disciplines that students studying B. Sc. (Nanotechnology) receive. The award of B. Sc. (Nanotechnology) with Honours is made on successful completion of a specialist Nanotechnology research project in the final year of the program. Class sizes are typically 10-35, permitting considerable interaction between academics, researchers and students. This fosters close links between nanotechnology students and research schools. As of 2011, UNSW had graduated over 100 nanotechnologists, of whom four had received University medals.

Students entering B. Sc. (Nanotechnology) at UNSW should have a good high school education in physics, chemistry and mathematics. Organisations employ nanotechnology graduates because of their broad training, capacity to think critically and laterally, and their problem solving abilities. The National Nanotechnology Initiative (nano.gov) predicts that 2 million nanotechnology workers will be needed by 2015, across a broad spectrum of industries.

Close links have been developed between the degree course and the following research centres:

– Australian Centre for Nanomedicine – Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology – Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF) – ARC Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence – Mark Wainwright Analytical Centre

On completion of this program, students will have attained a comprehensive knowledge base in the field of nanotechnology.

Stage 1 (common for all students in the program)

Semester 1

Semester 2

Students then choose either a Nanodevices or Nanomaterials major, and follow the sequence of study outlined for the chosen major below:

Stage 2 (Nanodevices)

Semester 1

Semester 2

Stage 3 (Nanodevices)

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

Stage 4 (Nanodevices)

Nanomaterials Major Stage 2 (Nanomaterials)

Semester 1

Semester 2

Stage 3 (Nanomaterials)

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

Stage 4 (Nanomaterials)

Students in this program must satisfy the University’s General Education requirements. For further information, please refer to General Education in the Table of Contents (see left-hand side of this page).

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Robotic Surgery | University of Michigan Health System

§ October 16th, 2015 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Robotic Surgery | University of Michigan Health System

At the University of Michigan, we strive to use exciting, new technology that improves our patients’ outcomes and maintains their quality of life. Robotic surgery is one option that our surgeons excel in and continue to be at the forefront.

In 2001, The University of Michigan was among the first centers in the U.S. to utilize robotic technology for gynecological surgery. Currently we are one of a few surgery programs in the country with a dedicated robotic simulation center to train residents and physicians, plus develop new techniques for robotic surgery.

Conditions we treat and procedures we perform that may be appropriate for robotic surgery include:

Robotic surgery uses slender telescope-like instruments. The surgeon controls the robot from a console near the patient, where the operating field can be viewed in three dimensions. The robot acts as an extension of the surgeon’s hands, but with enhanced precision and dexterity, allowing more precise and accurate movements. As a result, complex surgeries can be performed through small incisions, with less blood loss and a quicker recovery.

We utilize the da Vinci Si Surgical System, which offers enhanced 3-D, high-definition vision with up to 10x magnification, which allows our surgeons to operate in small spaces more accurately. Your safety is increased by precise dissection and preservation of crucial nerves and vessels.

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