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Researchers Find Nanotoxicity Studies May Be Affected by Nanoparticles Staying Behind in Syringes – Lexology

§ December 12th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Researchers Find Nanotoxicity Studies May Be Affected by Nanoparticles Staying Behind in Syringes – Lexology

On November 25, 2019, the European Union (EU) Observatory for Nanomaterials (EUON) announced the publication of a study published in Frontiers in Pharmacology entitled Unpredictable Nanoparticle Retention in Commonly Used Plastic Syringes Introduces Dosage Uncertainties That May Compromise the Accuracy of Nanomedicine and Nanotoxicology Studies. The researchers in the study radiolabeled a variety of different nanoparticles, loaded suspensions of particles into different plastic syringes, and then measured the radioactivity left behind after emptying the nanoparticle suspension from the syringe. This provided a simple way to measure the fraction of nanoparticles that remained stuck inside the syringe. According to EUON, in the worst case, up to 79.1 percent of the nanoparticles remained. The study found variability in the amounts remaining behind depending on the types of particles and syringes used. The researchers propose checks to determine the correct combination of syringe and nanoparticle that should be used to minimize the problem. The study did not identify the root causes of the high variability between the different nanoparticles and syringe types used.

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Nanomedicine Market: 2020 With Top Competitors Analysis And Insights – Tech News Today

§ December 12th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Nanomedicine Market: 2020 With Top Competitors Analysis And Insights – Tech News Today

The Nanomedicine Market Report characterizes and briefs perusers about its items, applications, and particulars. The examination records key organizations working in the market and furthermore features the key changing course received by the organizations to keep up their quality. By utilizing SWOT investigation and Porters five power examination instruments, the qualities, shortcomings, openings, and malediction of key organizations are out and out referenced in the report. Each and every driving player in this worldwide market is profiled with subtleties, for example, item types, business outline, deals, fabricating base, candidate, applications, and particulars.

Key players inside the Nanomedicine market are known through auxiliary investigation, and their pieces of the pie are resolved through essential and optional examination. All action shares split, and breakdowns are fearless exploitation auxiliary sources and checked essential sources. The Nanomedicine Market report starts with a fundamental rundown of the exchange lifecycle, definitions, characterizations, applications, and exchange chain structure and each one these along can encourage driving players to see the extent of the Market, what attributes it offers and the manner in which itll satisfy clients needs.

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Our Free sample report provides a brief introduction to the research report overview, TOC, list of tables and figures, an overview of major market players and key regions included.

Major Players:

Abbott LaboratoriesAblynx NVAbraxis BioScience IncCelgene CorporationTeva Pharmaceutical Industries LimitedGE Healthcare LimitedMerck & Co. IncPfizer IncNanosphere IncJohnson & Johnson ServicesInc

Nanomedicine Market Research Methodology:

This investigation gauges it gives a point by point subjective and quantitative examination of the Nanomedicine market. Essential sources, for example, specialists from related enterprises and providers of Nanomedicine were met to acquire and confirm basic data and survey possibilities of the Nanomedicine market.

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The research provides explanations to the accompanying key queries of Nanomedicine industry:

1. What will be the market size and improvement pace of the Nanomedicine market for the assessed time period 2020 2029 transversely over different regions?

2. What are the key primary purposes expected to shape the destiny of the Nanomedicine business around the globe?

3. What procedures are the unquestionable traders changing in accordance with stay before their Nanomedicine contenders?

4. Which critical examples are influencing the improvement of the Nanomedicine market worldwide?

5. Which factors can avoid, challenge or even cutoff the improvement of the Nanomedicine market the world over?

6. What are the odds or future conceivable outcomes for the business visionaries working in the industry for the measure time allotment, 2020 2029?

Table of Contents:

1. Nanomedicine Market Survey.

2. Executive Synopsis.

3. Global Nanomedicine Market Race by Manufacturers.

4. Global Nanomedicine Production Market Share by Regions.

5. Global Nanomedicine Consumption by Regions.

6. Global Nanomedicine Production, Revenue, Price Trend by Type.

7. Global Nanomedicine Market Analysis by Applications.

8. Nanomedicine Manufacturing Cost Examination.

9. Advertising Channel, Suppliers, and Clienteles.

10. Market Dynamics

11. Global Nanomedicine, Market Estimate.

12. Investigations and Conclusion.

13. Important Findings in the Global Nanomedicine Study.

14. Appendixes.

15. company Profile.

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Nanomedicine Market Forecast to 2026 : How it is Going to Impact on Global Industry to Grow in Near Future – Gazette Quest

§ December 11th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Nanomedicine Market Forecast to 2026 : How it is Going to Impact on Global Industry to Grow in Near Future – Gazette Quest

Global Nanomedicine Market is forecast to bring about a fairly desirable remuneration portfolio by the end of the forecast period 2019-2025. Certainly, the report not only includes a modest growth rate over the forecast time frame but also contains a reliable overview of this business. The study involves overall growth opportunities and valuation currently this market is holding. Additionally, the report involves classified segmentation of Nanomedicine market.

The global Nanomedicine Market report comprises a thorough outline and upcoming view. Get sample copy of Nanomedicine Market Report at https://www.stratagemmarketinsights.com/sample/9943

Some of key competitors or manufacturers included in the study are:

Regional analysis covers:

Market Scenario:

The report further highlights the development trends in the global Nanomedicine market. Factors that are driving the market growth and fueling its segments are also analyzed in the report. The report also highlights on its applications, types, deployments, components, developments of this market.

Additionally, the report quotes worldwide certainties and countenance of Nanomedicine industry along with downstream and upstream analysis of leading players. Numerous research findings and conclusions stated in the report will help decision-makers to take imperative decisions in the near future.

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The Nanomedicine Market report is a compilation of first-hand information, qualitative and quantitative assessment by industry analysts, inputs from industry experts and industry participants across the value chain. The report provides an in-depth analysis of parent market trends, macro-economic indicators, and governing factors along with market attractiveness as per segments. The report also maps the qualitative impact of various market factors on market segments and geographies.

Nanomedicine Market report Segmented By Product Type:

Nanomedicine Market report Applications:

Chapters involved in Nanomedicine market report:

Chapter 1: Market Overview, Drivers, Restraints and Opportunities, Segmentation overviewChapter 2: Market Competition by ManufacturersChapter 3: Production by RegionsChapter 4: Consumption by RegionsChapter 5: Production, By Types, Revenue and Market share by TypesChapter 6: Consumption, By Applications, Market share (%) and Growth Rate by ApplicationsChapter 7: Complete profiling and analysis of ManufacturersChapter 8: Manufacturing cost analysis, Raw materials analysis, Region-wise manufacturing expensesChapter 9: Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream BuyersChapter 10: Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/TradersChapter 11: Market Effect Factors AnalysisChapter 12: Market ForecastChapter 13: Nanomedicine Research Findings and Conclusion, Appendix, methodology and data source

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Stratagem Market Insights is a management consulting organization providing market intelligence and consulting services worldwide. We bring the expertise of consultants with an cumulative industry experience of more than 70 years. The firm has been providing quantified B2B research and currently offers services to over 350+ customers worldwide. Our reports cover various end-use industries such as Aerospace and Defense, Agriculture, Food and Beverages, Automotive, Chemicals and Materials, Consumer Goods and Retail, Electronics, Energy, Mining, and Utilities, Pharmaceuticals, Manufacturing and Construction, Services, and Healthcare, and ICT.

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Researchers Identify Potential Cause of Elevated Nighttime Blood Pressure in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea – Cath Lab Digest

§ December 11th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Researchers Identify Potential Cause of Elevated Nighttime Blood Pressure in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea – Cath Lab Digest

Cell secretions may be key to diagnosing and treating nocturnal hypertension

COLUMBIA, Mo. (Dec. 10, 2019) Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) affects an estimated 22 million Americans. In addition to sleep problems, the condition can cause other health issues, including high blood pressure, chronic heart failure and stroke. Some patients with OSA are at an even higher risk of cardiovascular problems because of a phenomenon called reverse dipping that causes blood pressure to rise rather than lower during sleep. Most people experience lower blood pressure at night. Now,University of Missouri School of Medicineresearchers have found a potential cause for reverse dipping that may help patients with OSA get the help they need before cardiovascular disease develops.

We can now identify those with OSA at the highest risk of cardiovascular problems in order to prevent them from developing additional complications, saidDavid Gozal, MD, the Marie M. and Harry L. Smith Endowed Chair of Child Health at the MU School of Medicine. We can treat those patients more aggressively to ensure they adhere to therapy and use their continuous positive airway pressure device (CPAP) properly.

Gozal and fellow MU collaboratorAbdelnaby Khalyfa, PhD,studied46 patients diagnosed with OSA. They ranged in age from 18 to 70. Fifteen participants were identified to have a rise in blood pressure during sleep, while the remaining 31 participants had blood pressure readings that either remained the same or declined at night. The researchers collected blood from each participant to study the messages cells produce and send to each other through microscopic packages called exosomes.

We found that the cell messages coming from participants with night-time elevated blood pressure were different than those transmitted in subjects with normal blood pressure, Gozal said. The altered messages caused the cells that line the blood vessels to become dysfunctional. Those disturbed vessels allowed inflammatory cells to enter the vessels walls, causing hardening of those vessels and leading to cardiovascular disease.

Gozal said the cell message discovery will help clinicians personalize treatment for each patient diagnosed with OSA. A simple blood test administered at the beginning of a sleep study could indicate each patients cardiovascular risk.

Gozal said additional research is needed to study the patients at highest risk of cardiovascular complications from OSA to see if CPAP compliance can actually reduce blood pressure or normalize the cell messages used to determine a patients risk.

In addition to Gozal and Khalyfa, the study authors include Bharati Prasad, MD, University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System; and Wen-Ching Chan, PhD, and Jorge Andrade, PhD, of the University of Chicagos Center for Research Informatics.

The study, Circulating Plasma Exosomes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Reverse-Dipping Blood Pressure, was recently published in theEuropean Respiratory Journal.Research reported in this publication was supported by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The authors of the study declare that they have no conflicts of interest related to this study. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the views of the funding agencies.

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About the MU School of Medicine

The MU School of Medicine has improved health, education and research in Missouri and beyond for more than 170 years. MU physicians treat patients from every county in the state, and more Missouri physicians received their medical degrees from MU than from any other university. For more information, visithttp://medicine.missouri.edu/.For more news, visit:http://medicine.missouri.edu/news/

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The genetic mutation behind a new autoinflammatory disease – Pursuit

§ December 11th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on The genetic mutation behind a new autoinflammatory disease – Pursuit

Every minute of every day our bodies are bombarded with millions of different molecules that we breathe, eat and touch including bacteria, viruses, chemicals and seemingly harmless compounds like food and pollen.

For every one of these encounters, our immune system has to decide if the substance is a threat or not, if it is foreign or self and how the body should respond to stay healthy. To do this, we rely on two immune systems working in tandem.

Scientists have discovered a new human autoinflammatory disease that results from a mutation in an important gene in one of these systems.

The syndrome, now known as CRIA (cleavage-resistant RIPK1-induced autoinflammatory) syndrome causes recurring episodes of debilitating and distressing fever and inflammation.

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Our bodys first line of defence is the innate immune system that is effectively a hard wired and fast response, explains Dr Najoua Lalaoui from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research (WEHI) and the Department of Medical Biology at the University of Melbourne.

This system works in the skin and mucous membranes like the mouth, making sure that any invaders like bacteria are detected and destroyed quickly, she says.

If pathogens do enter the body, the innate immune cells move to the site of infection and physically devour invaders and activate chemical messengers to alert the body.

This can lead to an inflammatory reaction where blood circulation is increased, the affected area becomes swollen and hot, and the person may experience fever. When these chemical messengers are over-active it can result in conditions like colitis, arthritis and psoriasis.

Supporting this system is the adaptive immunity system that involves antibodies that recognise and then train the body to respond to threats. This is our memory immunity and the basis of how vaccinations work.

Scientists from the WEHI, with colleagues at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States, have been working to understand why patients from three families suffered from a history of painful swollen lymph nodes, fever and inflammation.

The families had a range of other inflammatory symptoms which began in childhood and continued into their adult years.

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This type of repeated fever often indicates an issue with the innate immune system and the same disease in an extended family can indicate genetic changes that are passed from parents to their children, explains Dr Lalaoui.

Previous tests didnt identify any known cause.

But by sequencing the patients genomes, the NIH team identified a mutation in DNA that codes for a molecule known as RIPK that they suspected might cause the disease.

RIPK is a critical regulator of inflammation and the cell death pathway responsible for cleaning up damaged cells or those infected by pathogens.

Professor John Silke from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute and his team have been studying RIPK1 for more than 10 years. His team had previously shown that damaging the RIPK1 gene could lead to uncontrolled inflammation and cell death.

RIPK1 is a potent controller of cell death, which means cells have had to develop many ways of regulating its activity, Professor Silke says.

In this paper, we showed that one way that the cell regulates its activity is by cleaving RIPK1 into two pieces to disarm the molecule and halt its role in driving inflammation.

In this condition (CRIA), the mutations are preventing the molecule from being cleaved into two pieces, resulting in autoinflammatory disease. This helped confirm that the mutations identified by the NIH researchers were indeed causing the disease, he says.

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He explains that mutations in RIPK1 can drive both too much inflammation as in autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases and too little inflammation, resulting in immunodeficiency.

There is still a lot to learn about the varied roles of RIPK1 in cell death, and how we can effectively target RIPK1 to treat disease.

In CRIA syndrome, the mutation in RIPK1 overcomes all of the normal checks and balances that exist, resulting in uncontrolled cell death and inflammation, says Dr Steven Boyden from the National Human Genome Research Institute at the NIH.

Dr Boyden says the first clue that the disease was linked to cell death was when they delved into the patients exomes the part of the genome that encodes all of the proteins in the body.

The team sequenced the entire exome of each patient and discovered unique mutations in the exact same amino acid of RIPK1 in each of the three families.

It is remarkable, like lightning striking three times in the same place. Each of the three mutations has the same result it blocks cleavage of RIPK1 which shows how important RIPK1 cleavage is in maintaining the normal function of the cell, says Dr Boyden.

Dr Lalaoui said the WEHI researchers then confirmed the link between the RIPK1 mutations and CRIA syndrome in laboratory models.

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We showed that mice with mutations in the same location in RIPK1 as in the CRIA syndrome patients, had a similar exacerbation of inflammation, she says.

Dr Dan Kastner from NIH widely regarded as the father of autoinflammatory disease says colleagues had treated CRIA syndrome patients with a number of anti-inflammatory medications, including high doses of corticosteroids and biologics, compounds that block specific parts of the immune system.

And although some of the patients markedly improved, others responded less well or had significant side effects.

Understanding the molecular mechanism by which CRIA syndrome causes inflammation provides an opportunity to get right to the root of the problem, Dr Kastner says.

Dr Kastner noted that RIPK1 inhibitors, which are already available on a research basis, may provide a focused, precision medicine approach to treating patients.

RIPK1 inhibitors may be just what the doctor ordered for these patients. The discovery of CRIA syndrome also suggests a possible role for RIPK1 in a broad spectrum of human illnesses, such as colitis, arthritis and psoriasis.

Banner: WEHI

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Imaging Reveals Pathways Behind Depression – Imaging Technology News

§ December 11th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Imaging Reveals Pathways Behind Depression – Imaging Technology News

December 10, 2019 Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) illuminates abnormalities in the brains of people with depression, potentially opening the door to new and improved treatments for the disorder, according to two studies presented in December the annual meeting of the Radiological Society ofNorth America(RSNA).

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common and debilitating mental disorders worldwide. Symptoms include feelings of hopelessness, diminished interest in daily activities, and fatigue. Limited understanding of the brain changes associated with MDD hinders the effectiveness of treatments. "Unfortunately, with current treatments there is a large chance of relapse or recurrence," saidKenneth T. Wengler, Ph.D., fromColumbia UniversityinNew York Cityand co-author of one of the studies. "To develop new, more effective treatments, we must improve our understanding of the disorder."

Wengler and colleagues at the Renaissance School of Medicine atStony BrookUniversity inStony Brook, N.Y., recently studied connections between MDD and disruptions in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a network of blood vessels and tissue that protects the brain from foreign substances. Using a new MRI technique they developed called intrinsic diffusivity encoding of arterial labeled spins (IDEALS), they looked at BBB water permeability, or the movement of water out of the blood vessels and into the brain tissue.

Comparison of results in 14 healthy individuals and 14 MDD patients found that less water moved from inside the blood vessels to outside in the MDD patients, representing disrupted BBB integrity. This difference was particularly large in two regions of the brain: the amygdala and the hippocampus.

"We observed disruption of the blood-brain barrier in gray matter regions known to be altered in major depressive disorder," Wengler said. "This study helps improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of depression and can open new avenues of treatment for a disorder that affects over 100 million individuals worldwide."

A second study presented at RSNA 2019 looked at abnormalities in the complex network of connections in the brain known as the connectome for their role in depression. Previous research has focused on characterizing the connections between different brain regions, but this study, from researchers at theUniversity of North Carolina(UNC) in Chapel Hill, N.C., looked deeper within individual brain regions.

The researchers compared 66 adults with MDD and 66 matched healthy controls during wakeful rest using functional MRI (fMRI) and a newly developed multiscale neural model inversion framework that linked the brain's microscopic circuitry with its larger-scale interactions. As part of the study, the researchers were able to assess excitatory or inhibitory influence between neuronal cell groups. A proper balance between excitation and inhibition is crucial to a well-functioning brain.

Patients with MDD had abnormal patterns of excitation and inhibition at the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, a brain area important to cognitive control functions, including the regulation of the amygdala, a key region embedded deep in the brain for expression of emotion. It has long been hypothesized that malfunctioning inhibitory control over the amygdala could result in depressive symptoms.

"In our study, we found that excitation and inhibition in the brain regions in control of executive functions and emotional regulation were reduced in patients with MDD," said study co-author Guoshi Li, Ph.D., from the Image Display, Enhancement and Analysis (IDEA) group atUNC. "This suggests that control functions in MDD are impaired, which may lead to elevated responses in the amygdala, resulting in increased anxiety and other negative moods."

In addition, the researchers found that recurrent excitation in the thalamus, an area of the central brain that is also responsible for emotional regulation, was abnormally elevated in patients with MDD.

Li said the new approach could open the door for a deeper understanding of the mechanisms behind depression. "Current methods of studying the brain provide a superficial understanding of connectivity," Li said. "This method allows us to identify impaired connectivity within each brain region, making it a potentially more powerful tool to study the neuromechanism of brain disorders and develop more effective diagnosis and treatment."

Wengler's co-authors areKwan Y. Chen, M.D.,Christine DeLorenzo, Ph.D.,Mark E. Schweitzer, M.D.,Turhan Canli, Ph.D., andXiang He, Ph.D. The study was funded byStony BrookUniversity.

Li's co-authors areYujie Liu, M.D.,Yanting Zheng, Ph.D., Ye Wu, Ph.D., Pew-Thian Yap, Ph.D.,Shijun Qiu, M.D.,Han Zhang, Ph.D., andDinggang Shen, Ph.D. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

For more information: http://www.rsna.org

Brain Scans May Help Diagnose Neurological, Psychiatric Disorders

MRI Uncovers Brain Abnormalities in People With Depression and Anxiety

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Researchers find another piece of puzzle relating to bird flu viruses – News-Medical.net

§ December 11th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Researchers find another piece of puzzle relating to bird flu viruses – News-Medical.net

Normally, bird flu viruses do not spread easily from person to person. But if this does happen, it could trigger a pandemic. Researchers from the MDC and RKI have now explained in the journal Nature Communications what makes the leap from animals to humans less likely.

Whenever people suddenly become infected with a bird flu virus such as H5N1, H7N9, and H5N6, the World Health Organization (WHO) has to assess the risk: Are these the first signs of a pandemic? Or is it just a few dozen or hundred cases that have only arisen through close contact with infected poultry? Researchers led by Professor Matthias Selbach from the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) have now found another piece of the puzzle that may be important in this initial assessment. In a paper published in Nature Communications, the researchers explain that avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) are unable to transform infected human cells into effective virus factories, because they do not produce enough of the matrix protein M1 following infection. The virus requires this protein, however, to export its many copies of its genetic material from the cell nucleus - a prerequisite for building new viruses.

Not all flu is the same - the name refers to a large family of viruses. Each member of this family is named after two prickly growths on the virus's surface: hemagglutinin (H), which enables the virus to infect human and animal cells where it can multiply, and neuraminidase (N), which helps the virus's offspring to extract themselves from the infected cell. In waterfowl, there are 16 known hemagglutinin subtypes and nine known neuraminidase subtypes. That results in at least 144 possible combinations that are constantly changing and adapting to new hosts - like chickens, for example, but also mammals including horses, pigs, and humans.

Such new virus variants are often more dangerous than seasonal flu, because the human immune system has never encountered them before. Some people find themselves defenseless, while the immune system of others reacts so violently that the person's own resistance damages the body. In the worst case scenario, a pandemic could cost millions of lives. The Spanish flu of 1918, for example, claimed more than 50 million victims. Researchers around the world are therefore trying to understand the rules that determine when there is the possibility of a pandemic, and when there is not.

"Hemagglutinin in humans and birds has a slightly different chemical structure, for example, which makes it more difficult for an avian influenza virus to infiltrate a human cell than a bird's cell," explains Selbach. Boris Bogdanow, a PhD student in Selbach's research group and the lead author of the current study, focused his research specifically on what other natural species barriers exist in flu viruses.

Matthias Selbach's group analyses proteins using quantitative mass spectrometry. In collaboration with the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), Boris Bogdanow and his colleagues infected human pulmonary epithelial cells separately with a bird flu virus and a human flu virus. They then measured the quantity of all newly produced proteins in the mass spectrometer. Postdoctoral researcher Dr. Katrin Eichelbaum had also developed a method that enables the precise differentiation of new and old proteins. "In the first analysis, we did not find any major differences between the two strains," reports Boris Bogdanow. "At first glance, the avian flu virus and the human virus displayed little difference with regard to protein production, which was quite surprising."

But the devil is in the detail, so Bogdanow performed more in-depth analyses to take a closer look at the protein distribution. In doing so, he came across the matrix protein M1, much larger quantities of which were produced in the lung cells infected with the human virus. The M1 protein is responsible, among other things, for exporting the replicated viral RNA from the nucleus of the infected cells and then assembling it with other newly produced viral proteins to form flu virus offspring. Could it be, therefore, that the viral RNA of bird flu viruses in human cells remains trapped in the cell nucleus because too little M1 protein is present?

Fluorescence microscopic investigations confirmed these suspicions. The genetic material of the bird flu virus was far less capable of breaking out of the cell nucleus than the RNA of the human flu virus. But why? With the help of the MDC's sequencing platform and Professor Irmtraud Meyer, they discovered a small segment in the viral RNA of the avian flu virus that affects alternative splicing. "We call this a cis-regulatory element," says Bogdanow. "Alternative splicing regulates which proteins are ultimately made from a single gene, because many genes code for more than one protein. When human cells are attacked by bird flu, this element ensures that more M2 rather than M1 protein is produced."

In order to assess the relevance of this result, Professor Thorsten Wolff and his research team from the Robert Koch Institute transferred the cis-regulatory element from the bird virus to the human virus. This did indeed result in the human flu virus replicating less effectively in human lung cells. Selbach's team even conducted a similar experiment with Spanish flu viruses, whose genetic material was isolated in the nineties from graves in the permafrost soil of Alaska. However, they only used a small part of the viral RNA and not the entire virus for the experiment. Nevertheless, they were also able to confirm their theory on the cis-regulatory element for this virus.

"How pathogenic an avian flu virus is and whether or not it has pandemic potential depends, of course, on many factors," says Selbach. "A study on cell cultures cannot cover all these factors. Nevertheless, it might be useful in future to include an analysis of this RNA segment in the risk assessment of avian influenza viruses."

Source:

Journal reference:

Bogdanow, B. et al. (2019) The dynamic proteome of influenza A virus infection identifies M segment splicing as a host range determinant. Nature Communications. doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13520-8

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Concussion Alters How Information Is Transmitted Within the Brain – Imaging Technology News

§ December 11th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Concussion Alters How Information Is Transmitted Within the Brain – Imaging Technology News

December 10, 2019 Damage from concussion alters the way information is transmitted between the two halves of the brain, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society ofNorth America(RSNA).

Research has shown that the corpus callosum, a bundle of nerve fibers that carries signals between the brain's left and right hemispheres, is vulnerable to damage from mild traumatic brain injury, commonly known as concussion. Less is known about the impact of this damage on cognitive function.

To learn more, researchers atNew York University(NYU) School of Medicine inNew York Citycompared the condition of the corpus callosum in 36 patients with recent concussion to that of 27 healthy controls. They studied the participants' brains with two innovative advances, including an MRI technique that uses measures of water diffusion to provide a microscopic view of the brain's signal-carrying white matter.

"Looking at how water molecules are diffusing in the nerve fibers in the corpus callosum and within the microenvironment around the nerve fibers allows us to better understand the white matter microstructural injury that occurs," said study co-authorMelanie Wegener, M.D., resident physician at NYU Langone Health inNew York City.

Wegener and colleagues combined the MRI findings with results from the study's second innovative advance, called an Interhemispheric Speed of Processing Task, a test developed at NYU Langone that evaluates how well the two hemispheres in the brain communicate with each other.

For the test, the participants were told to sit in a chair and focus their gaze on the letter X that was displayed on a screen directly in front of them. The researchers then flashed three-letter words to the right or the left of the X and asked the participants to say those words as quickly as possible. When the researchers evaluated this reaction time in both patients with concussion and healthy controls, they noticed an interesting phenomenon.

"There is a definite and reproducible delay in reaction time to the words presented to the left of the X compared with words presented to the right visual field," Wegener said. "This shows it takes time for information to cross the corpus callosum from one hemisphere to the other, which is measured by the difference in response time between words presented to different sides of our visual field."

This delay is likely due to the fact that language function is most often located in the brain's left hemisphere. This means that information presented to the left visual field is first transmitted to the right visual cortex in the brain and then has to cross over the corpus callosum to get to the left language center. In contrast, words that are presented to the right visual field do not need to cross the corpus callosum.

Performance on the test correlated with brain findings on MRI. In the healthy controls, reaction time corresponded with several diffusion measures in the splenium, an area of the corpus callosum located between the right visual cortex and the left language center. No such correlation was found in the concussion patients, suggesting microstructural changes relating to injury.

"We saw a correlation between white matter microstructure injury and the clinical status of the patient," Wegener said. "This information could ultimately help with treatment in patients who have mild traumatic brain injury."

For instance, Dr. Wegener said, patients could undergo MRI immediately after a concussion to see if they experienced any clinically important white matter injury and thus may benefit from early intervention.

"Another thing we can do is use MRI to look at patients' brains during treatment and monitor the microstructure to see if there is a treatment-related response," she said.

Co-authors areJoshua Bacon, Ph.D., Sohae Chung, Ph.D.,Xiuyuan Wang, M.S.,Tamar Bacon, B.A.,Joseph F. Rath, Ph.D.,James S. Babb, Ph.D., andYvonne W. Lui, M.D. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

For more information:RSNA.org

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FIU researcher named Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors – PRNewswire

§ December 10th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on FIU researcher named Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors – PRNewswire

MIAMI, Dec. 9, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Florida International University Distinguished Professor Madhavan Nair has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

Nair, an internationally renowned expert in nanotechnology and HIV research, is the founding chair of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine's Department of Immunology and Nano-Medicine. He is also associate vice president of nanomedicine, associate dean of biomedical research, and director of the Institute of NeuroImmune Pharmacology at FIU.

"This distinction is a fitting tribute to the immense contributions of Dr. Nair to the scientific fields of immunology and of nanotechnology. Importantly, Dr. Nair's legacy of discoveries and inventions will yield better outcomes for patients suffering from AIDS and other types of life-threatening diseases," said Dr. Robert Sackstein, dean of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine and senior vice president for Health Affairs.

The NAI Fellows Program highlights academic inventors who have demonstrated a spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. Election as an NAI Fellow is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors.

Nair's current research focuses mainly on the role that drug abuse of various substances like alcohol, morphine, cocaine, and methamphetamine has on neuro-AIDS, neurological disorders caused primarily by HIV damage to the central and peripheral nervous systems. Nair is also developing therapeutic approaches to control neuro-AIDS by specific drug targeting to the brain using his own patented nanotechnology. Nair is the first FIU researcher to earn a prestigious MERIT Award from the National Institutes of Health recognizing outstanding competence and productivity in research. He holds 14 U.S patents and has published more than 250 papers as first and/or senior author.

The NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony will be held next April in Phoenix, Arizona.

Media Contact: Ileana Varela 305-348-4926 ilvarela@fiu.edunews.fiu.edu @FIUNews

SOURCE Florida International University

http://fiu.edu

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Cancer in the workplace: Innovative diagnostic devices and treatments – Bangkok Post

§ December 10th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Cancer in the workplace: Innovative diagnostic devices and treatments – Bangkok Post

Cancer itself is a very broad based topic. There are various forms of cancer and many different types of diagnostics and treatments that are currently available. In our earlier articles, we have touched on various aspects of cancer:

- Key facts with statistics - Major causes- The correlation between employment and the illness- Risk reduction- Types of treatment available- Treatment cost overview- Integrative and Preventive Medicine

So far, the treatment model that is proven by several sources to have the best results is through Integrative Medicine. Its approach is to combine conventional methods with both complementary and alternative therapies. It is very patient-centred, making use of natural products, modification of lifestyle, diet, a mind-body-spirit healing journey together with conventional treatments like chemotherapy.

Dr. ChatChai Sribundit (M.D) from Akesis Life Bangkok (akesisoncology.com) emphasises the important role that integrative medicine plays in todays cancer management and in many cancer-care programs. As he mentioned in earlier articles, almost one third of cancer cases are actually preventable. Risk factors can be eliminated and implementing existing evidence-based preventive strategies are definitely the winning formula.

In the long run, preventive strategies in the form of regular exercise and maintaining a healthy weight reduces the risk not only of cancer but many other primary medical conditions. In addition, a well-balanced lifestyle and healthy food provide both long and short term benefits. Apart from the above, Dr. Chatchai stands firmly by his 5 pillars consisting of medical intervention, diet & nutrition, physical therapy & exercise, emotional wellness and patient education.

Together with the basis of the 5 Pillars, early detection with timely and proper patient management can greatly reduce cancer risk. Many cancers have a high chance of cure if diagnosed early and treated adequately.

Chemotherapy and radiotherapy remain a mainstream form of treatment whereas tissue biopsy and scans are general diagnostic tools commonly used in Conventional therapies for cancer. In some cases, a targeted approach is lacking and patients can be vulnerable to certain types of drugs. Recently, new treatments have been emerging to improve the traditional options in cancer treatment with poor prognosis. Areas like nanomedicine and extracellular vesicles along with advances in immunotherapy and nanotechnology are becoming a norm for the next generation of cancer diagnosis and treatments.

Liquid Biopsy

Molecular targeting of specific oncogenic mutations in human cancer is now key for anti-cancer drug therapy as mutations lead to drug resistance. Therefore, the ability to detect and continuously monitor oncogenic mutations is important as it guides the use of targeted molecular therapies to improve long-term clinical outcomes in patients. Apart from direct sampling of cancer tissue by biopsy, oncogenic mutations are also detectable in circulating bodily fluids of patients which is a less invasive method.

Cancer biomarker discovery using DNA aptamersBiomarkers are molecules able to indicate specific physiological states of cells. Identifying reliable biomarkers is essential for early diagnosis and adaptive treatment strategies. According to pub.vsc.org, aptamers are single-stranded oligonucleotides generated by an in vitro screening method called Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). They can recognise their cognate targets with selectivity and affinity comparable to protein antibodies in cancer patients.

Nanomedicine

Treating cancer with nanotechnology has become one of the emerging trends. Studies reveal that treating cancer by nanoparticle enhances the efficiency of the treatment and also minimises adverse effects. The property of nanoparticles in treating cancer is target specific. Nanoparticles also target uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are released by all cells within the tumour microenvironment, such as endothelial cells, tumour-associated fibroblasts, pericytes, and immune system cells. The EVs carry the load of parental cells formed of proteins and nucleic acids, that convey cell-to-cell communication and also suppress tumour progression. Due to longevity of vesicles within the circulation and their ability to cross bloodbrain barriers, modification of these unique organelles offers the potential to create new biological-tools for cancer therapy.

These treatments help ones immune system to find and attack cancer cells the same way it attacks bacteria and viruses. It uses substances made by the body or in a laboratory to improve or restore immune system function. Immunotherapy may work by maximising the immune system to prevent or slow down the growth of cancer and reduce the probability of spreading. Some examples of immunotherapy, include, NK Cell therapy, Cancer vaccines (prophylactic or therapeutic) and T-cell therapy.

Commonly use in Integrative medicine and in conjunction with radiation, hyperthermia is a non-invasive method of increasing tumour temperature to stimulate blood flow and improve oxygenation. This makes cancer cells more sensitive during radiation therapy. Hyperthermia helps address the limitations of radiation for many patients by effectively increasing the radiation dose without increasing in unwanted side effects. There are significant results which show the effect of hyperthermia approach in treating cancer.

Longdom.org states that this treatment uses a drug called photosensitizer or photosensitizing agents. Agents and particular type of light are exposed at a specific wavelength. The specificity of wavelength depends on the production of oxygen. Oxygen destroys nearby Cancer cells. The wave length determines the distance travelled by the light into the body. The photosensitizer present in a tumour absorbs the light and produces oxygen which destroys surrounding cancer cells.

This treatment uses light amplification by the stimulated emission of radiation. Laser therapy for treating cancer includes special light beams instead of instruments. Laser therapy is normally given through an endoscopic tube. There are different types of laser therapies used for treatment of cancer. The Endoscope is inserted in the body to treat cancer or precancerous growth. Lasers can also be used to shrink or destroy tumours or precancerous growth.

The initial stage, which is most important, is the detection of cancer. Early detection could increase the possibility of cure and increases survival rates. However, poor prognosis due to lack of proper diagnosing methods and ineffective chemotherapeutic treatment is a common hurdle. As synthetic drugs cause many side effects, and cancer cells become resistant, more innovative treatment methods must be considered to give new hope for existing sufferers.

Author: Ezree Ebrahim, Business Development Consultant (Healthcare), Akesis Life by Absolute Health. For Further information, please contact: ezree.ebrahim@akesisoncology.com

Series Editor: Christopher F. Bruton, Executive Director, Dataconsult Ltd, chris@dataconsult.co.th. Dataconsults Thailand Regional Forum provides seminars and extensive documentation to update business on future trends in Thailand and in the Mekong Region.

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Concussion Alters How Information Is Transmitted Within the Brain – Technology Networks

§ December 10th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Concussion Alters How Information Is Transmitted Within the Brain – Technology Networks

Damage from concussion alters the way information is transmitted between the two halves of the brain, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).Research has shown that the corpus callosum, a bundle of nerve fibers that carries signals between the brain's left and right hemispheres, is vulnerable to damage from mild traumatic brain injury, commonly known as concussion. Less is known about the impact of this damage on cognitive function.

To learn more, researchers at New York University (NYU) School of Medicine in New York City compared the condition of the corpus callosum in 36 patients with recent concussion to that of 27 healthy controls. They studied the participants' brains with two innovative advances, including an MRI technique that uses measures of water diffusion to provide a microscopic view of the brain's signal-carrying white matter.

"Looking at how water molecules are diffusing in the nerve fibers in the corpus callosum and within the microenvironment around the nerve fibers allows us to better understand the white matter microstructural injury that occurs," said study co-author Melanie Wegener, M.D., resident physician at NYU Langone Health in New York City.

Dr. Wegener and colleagues combined the MRI findings with results from the study's second innovative advance, called an Interhemispheric Speed of Processing Task, a test developed at NYU Langone that evaluates how well the two hemispheres in the brain communicate with each other.

For the test, the participants were told to sit in a chair and focus their gaze on the letter X that was displayed on a screen directly in front of them. The researchers then flashed three-letter words to the right or the left of the X and asked the participants to say those words as quickly as possible. When the researchers evaluated this reaction time in both patients with concussion and healthy controls, they noticed an interesting phenomenon.

"There is a definite and reproducible delay in reaction time to the words presented to the left of the X compared with words presented to the right visual field," Dr. Wegener said. "This shows it takes time for information to cross the corpus callosum from one hemisphere to the other, which is measured by the difference in response time between words presented to different sides of our visual field."

This delay is likely due to the fact that language function is most often located in the brain's left hemisphere. This means that information presented to the left visual field is first transmitted to the right visual cortex in the brain and then has to cross over the corpus callosum to get to the left language center. In contrast, words that are presented to the right visual field do not need to cross the corpus callosum.

Performance on the test correlated with brain findings on MRI. In the healthy controls, reaction time corresponded with several diffusion measures in the splenium, an area of the corpus callosum located between the right visual cortex and the left language center. No such correlation was found in the concussion patients, suggesting microstructural changes relating to injury.

"We saw a correlation between white matter microstructure injury and the clinical status of the patient," Dr. Wegener said. "This information could ultimately help with treatment in patients who have mild traumatic brain injury."

For instance, Dr. Wegener said, patients could undergo MRI immediately after a concussion to see if they experienced any clinically important white matter injury and thus may benefit from early intervention.

"Another thing we can do is use MRI to look at patients' brains during treatment and monitor the microstructure to see if there is a treatment-related response," she said.

Reference:http://press.rsna.org/pressrelease/2019_resources/2132/abstract.pdf

This article has been republished from the following materials. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

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Could bacteria eaters save the planet? – 83degreesmedia

§ December 10th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Could bacteria eaters save the planet? – 83degreesmedia

As the end of fall semester looms, a lab at USF buzzes with focused energy. Students in the SEA-PHAGES program are preparing DNA samples for gel electrophoresis, each of them working to isolate a unique bacteriophage -- a microscopic organism known colloquially as a "phage," or by its charming Latin root translation "bacteria eater."

Phage are highly individualized, innumerably varied, naturally occurring microscopic organisms. They replicate by infecting bacteria with debilitating viruses, but unlike chemical antibiotics, phages are so highly specialized that they attack only specific strains. In other words: phage are very picky bacteria eaters -- and that's a good thing, because they leave "good" bacteria, like human gut flora, alone.

The handful of phage samples whose genomes students merit further study

A lot of things happen at the microbial level -- and environmental science, for example, red tide, is dealing directly with bacteria. As a T.A., you definitely get to sit back and see how much work is actually done in a lab. I didn't realize before all the components that are necessary to actually allow me to do the work. -- Elisabeth Howells, Environmental Policy major, SEA-PHAGES T.A.

While his students work, SEA-PHAGES USF instructor, Dr. Richard Pollenz, offers a line of Socratic questioning to encourage scientific rigor.

"The first semester is all about getting a wet lab experience and learning microbiology techniques. Students learn math exercises to calculate numbers of phage -- and we're talking about huge numbers: billions and billions of phage in each sample," Pollenz says.

Moments later, he'll press his students to tell him exactly how they plan to dilute their samples enough to isolate an individual, microscopic organism among the billions. They'll need to know that on the final.

Most SEA-PHAGES participants are first-year STEM students who opt to spend double the typical weekly bio course hours in Pollenz' lab -- but the work pays off. SEA-PHAGES participants earn undergrad research credit on top of biology prereqs. They also get to name the phage they identify and register it in the GenBank -- an annotated collection of DNA sequences for every known organism.

And, no pressure, but: A growing consensus within medical science is that the future of humanity could lie in the phage positioned under these students' microscopes.

"You're doing real-world stuff, here, contributing to a database that may have some real significance down the road," Pollenz reminds them as their two-hour lab session winds down. "That's powerful."

Class is over, but the lab still hums with excitement and a sense of purpose.

Universities ignite early interest in STEM disciplines

Fewer than 40% of students who enter college intending to major in science, technology, engineering, and math fields actually complete a STEM degree.

SEA-PHAGES -- an acronym for Science Education Alliance-Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science -- originated at the University of Pittsburgh in 2008 at the urging of phage researcher and biotechnology Professor Dr. Graham Hatfull.

The program is designed to meet college freshmen at the university door and to usher them into labs where the coursework is to identify a phage, analyze it, and log it into the GenBank. Because there is growing clinical evidence that phage effectively combats drug-resistant bacterial infections: every new phage SEA-PHAGES students enter in the GenBank helps push the needle forward in modern medicine.

"The idea is that in the STEM field, an emphasis on getting students a non-didactic applied learning experience that involves defined outcomes they can control and could have ownership of should be at the forefront. It's important to get students to understand the power of research," Pollenz says.

"The warmer we get [due to climate change], the more bacterial growth amplifies, and the more health problems we have from that perspective the antibiotic resistance situation, as well as the number of bacteria that might impact us, is only going to increase over time. And that's why we need real-world solutions that people are willing to invest in, right now, so that it will be easier to go from diagnosis to cure." says Dr. Richard Pollenz, a USF research instructor

Many of the students currently enrolled in SEA-PHAGES USF say they were introduced to the program when they attended USF-HHMI STEM Academy, a weeklong immersive experience Pollenz directs, in which incoming students connect with real-world STEM professionals.

Pollenz underscores the value of empowering students through scientific ownership. He notes that because of phage ubiquity, every student will discover a unique organism in the soil sample they take during their first semester in the program -- which, for many students, is their first-ever college coursework.

"This allows each student to have 100% ownership over [their phage]. They take the sample, isolate it, and do a microscopy, so they actually get to see it -- and that has a tremendous amount of power. It's a rare thing to see what you're working on," Pollenz notes.

Marian Smallin, who participated in the first SEA-PHAGES cohort at USF, is now in her third year studying Cellular Molecular Biology. She's currently preparing grad school applications.

"The [SEA-PHAGES] program itself is not easy -- though I enjoy the challenge. It really helped shape my scientific identity. I'd already had the idea I wanted to be a researcher because when I was in high school, I got sick with a genetic disease. But going through the experience of being an actual researcher in my first semester -- that's what really solidified it for me. It's why I know this is what I want to do," says Smallin.

Phage research saves lives

In 2019, the UN World Health Organization sounded a chilling alarm on antimicrobial-resistant disease: By the year 2050, drug-resistant diseases could cause 10 million deaths, annually, and up to $100 trillion damage to the global economy. By as early as 2030, antimicrobial resistance could force up to 24 million people into extreme poverty.

"I think when Dr. Hatfull started this work, the idea we'd ever be able to really

It's hard to find such interesting and meaningful undergraduate research. Especially [when I think about how] my research now could impact lives in the future if my bacteriophage ends up curing some strain of bacteria. -- Ava Sciacchitano, 1st-year Biomedical Sciences, planning to study cellular and molecular bio

Phage therapy shows demonstrable promise as an alternative to chemical antibiotics. When researchers are able to code out the bacteria-busting prowess of a specific phage, that phage can be applied to target, weaken, and even destroy deadly infection-causing bacteria such as Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, Escherichia Coli (E. Coli), Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA), and more.

"The idea of using these particular organisms as antibiotics has always been in the literature" -- Pollenz notes Nobel Prize-winning phage research during and prior to the Cold War era, and Sinclair Lewis' 1925 novel, Arrowsmith, in which the protagonist discovers a phage that destroys bacteria during an outbreak of bubonic plague on a fictional Caribbean island -- "but the reality is that only in the past three to five years have there been significant documented cases in the U.S. and the U.K. of injecting [phage] into human beings to completely remediate them from a bacteria that was otherwise going to kill them."

Pollenz points to the recent application of phage therapy to combat bacterial infections in cystic fibrosis patients in the U.S. as an indication of the bacteria eater's unique, but challenging, potential.

"There were four cases where people with cystic fibrosis had developed a bacterial infection that was going to kill them. Every single one had the same bacterial infection -- but each one was slightly different, even though they were from the same bacterial family. That means that the phage that worked for Patient A didn't work for Patient B, and so on -- it's very specific."

Curing any given bacterial infection using phage therapy requires a "phage cocktail" -- a patient-specific combination of phage that demonstrates lab-tested ability to attack the bacterial strain in question.

The challenge is that 1031(thats 10 to the 31st power) is an almost unfathomable number of phage to catalog -- so many that if these microscopic organisms were lined up, they could stretch a chain from Earth to the sun, several times over.

That's where SEA-PHAGES students' efforts shine.

"As we continue to collect more phage into the repository, it becomes a commodity that can be mined and evaluated to see which phage are capable of infecting more pathogenic bacteria that are out there," Pollenz says.

Pollenz suggests that phage, with more research, could even be used in the future for environmental monitoring and bioremediation.

"If phage do what we're seeing them do to cure bacterial infections in humans, consider the possibilities: In countries that lack more sophisticated water treatment plants, for instance, phage could one day be a solution to kill bacteria in the water," Pollenz says.

He's confident that as more students enter science labs and develop a passion for STEM through programs like SEA-PHAGES, the brighter the future looks -- in spite of the valid anxiety over climate change, and the global rise in antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

"The warmer we get, the more bacterial growth amplifies, and the more health problems we have from that perspective the antibiotic resistance situation, as well as the number of bacteria that might impact us, is only going to increase over time -- and that's why we need real-world solutions that people are willing to invest in, right now, so that it will be easier to go from diagnosis to cure," Pollenz says.

"I think where we go from here is forward. What these students are doing -- isolating phage and putting that info into the database of possible candidates other researchers can use -- is so important. You're able to tell that student, 'hey, the phage you named Toby could be the phage that's used to cure someone.' And for students who are just entering STEM fields -- what a powerful hook."

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Technologies For Medical Lasers Market Poised to Expand at a Robust Pace Over 2022 – Crypto News Byte

§ December 10th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Technologies For Medical Lasers Market Poised to Expand at a Robust Pace Over 2022 – Crypto News Byte

The global market for medical lasers reached nearly $5.0 billion in 2016. This market is expected to increase from $5.6 billion in 2016 to nearly $11.5 billion in 2022 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 15.3% for 2017-2022.

Report Scope:

The report addresses the global market for lasers used in diagnostic, therapeutic and cosmetic applications during the period from 2016 through 2022. It addresses the market in its entirety as well as in selected regional and country markets.

Get More Information sample:https://www.trendsmarketresearch.com/report/sample/11819

The report does not cover the market for lasers used in the fabrication of medical devices (e.g., in the creation of microscopic features and spot welds). The focus is on the market for lasers themselves, rather than the larger pieces of equipment that incorporate them.

The format of the study includes the following elements: Types of medical lasers and their main applications. End-user segments. Market environment (legal and regulatory, standards, trends in the healthcare industry, demographic and economic trends, other market drivers and barriers to deployment). Detailed market estimates and projections, by type of laser/end-user segment/geographical area for the period 2016 to 2022. Supplier profiles. Patent analysis.

Report Includes:

An in-depth analysis of the global market and technologies for medical lasers. Analyses of global market trends, with data from 2015 and 2016, and projections of compounds annual growth rates (CAGRs) through 2021. Coverage of different types of medical lasers and their main applications. Patent analysis. Comprehensive company profiles of key players in the field.

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Report Summary

BCC Research estimates the global market for medical laser devices at nearly $5 billion in 2016. The market is expected to increase to more than $5.6 billion in 2017 and nearly $11.5 billion in 2022, a CAGR of 15.3% between 2017 and 2022.

While therapeutic laser applications account for a far larger share of the medical laser market than diagnostic applications, the latter are growing more rapidly, at a CAGR of almost 17.7% between 2017 and 2022 vs. 14.0%, respectively. As a result, the diagnostic applications market share is expected to grow between 2016 and 2022, from 31.5% to 35.6%.

Ophthalmology was the largest end-use segment of the medical laser market in 2016, with global sales of nearly $2.4 billion or 47.7% of the market, followed by cosmetic surgery ($1.3 billion or 26.7%) and therapeutic surgery ($820.5 million or 16.5%). Dentistry is the fastest-growing end-use segment for medical lasers, with a projected 2017 to 2022 CAGR of 23.9%, followed by veterinary medicine (16.8%) and cosmetic surgery (16.2%).

Report Description: https://www.trendsmarketresearch.com/report/analysis/BCC/global-markets-and-technologies-for-medical-lasers-market

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Technologies For Medical Lasers Market Poised to Expand at a Robust Pace Over 2022 - Crypto News Byte

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Why DNA is the thumb drive of the future – Genetic Literacy Project

§ December 10th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Why DNA is the thumb drive of the future – Genetic Literacy Project

DNA is designed to keep lots of data in a tiny space for an extremely long time. But the best way in which we can transfer our data onto DNA is still a topic of extensive debate. To find out more, we spoke to Dr Bill Efcavitch, Co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Molecular Assemblies, Inc., a company that has developed its own proprietary method of keeping our data safe on DNA.

[Ruairi MacKenzie]: What improvements on current storage tech will DNA data storage offer?

[Bill Efcavitch]: A key facet of DNA-based storage methods is the ability to pack tons of data into microscopic spaces. The higher data density of DNA means a smaller physical footprint for devices.

Also, DNA as a storage media has an extremely long lifetime, and is virtually indestructible, and the passive power consumption is much lower than current methods.

DNA-based data storage is immune to the electromagnetic pulse generated by nuclear weapons, which is important to the survivability of both government and financial records.

Modern DNA synthesis approaches are designed to maximize the speed and efficiency of the readback mechanism.

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Aesthetic Medicine And Cosmetic Surgery Market: Global Trends, Analysis and Forecast 2017 – 2027 – Markets Gazette 24

§ December 10th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Aesthetic Medicine And Cosmetic Surgery Market: Global Trends, Analysis and Forecast 2017 – 2027 – Markets Gazette 24

Business Intelligence Report on the Aesthetic Medicine And Cosmetic Surgery Market

Future Market Insights, in a recently published market study, offers valuable insights related to the overall dynamics of the Aesthetic Medicine And Cosmetic Surgery Market in the current scenario. Further, the report assesses the future prospects of the Aesthetic Medicine And Cosmetic Surgery by analyzing the various market elements including the current trends, opportunities, restraints, and market drivers.

As per the report, the Aesthetic Medicine And Cosmetic Surgery Market is set to grow at a CAGR of ~XX% over the forecast period 2017 2027 and exceed a value of ~US$ XX by the end of 2029. The report suggests that significant progress in technology, growing investments towards R&D projects, and increasing awareness related to curbing industrial waste are some of the primary factors that are expected to drive the growth of the Aesthetic Medicine And Cosmetic Surgery Market during the assessment period 2017 2027.

ThisPress Release will help you to understand the Volume, growth with Impacting Trends. Click HERE To get SAMPLE PDF (Including Full TOC, Table & Figures) at https://www.futuremarketinsights.co/reports/sample/REP-GB-3556

The presented report offers a microscopic view of the market scenario in different regions. The political and economic environment are thoroughly assessed to provide clarity on the growth prospects of the Aesthetic Medicine And Cosmetic Surgery market in each regional market.

Key Information that can be drawn from the Aesthetic Medicine And Cosmetic Surgery Market Report:

This chapter of the report tracks the business prospects of prominent market players operating in the Aesthetic Medicine And Cosmetic Surgery Market. The revenue growth, market share, product portfolio, pricing, sales, and marketing strategies of each company is discussed in the report.

Important queries related to the Aesthetic Medicine And Cosmetic Surgery Market addressed in the report:

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key players in aesthetic medicine and cosmetic surgery market areAllergan, Inc., Alma Laser, Cynosure, Galderma S.A., Lumenis, Johnson and Johnson, Solta Medical, Inc. and Syneron Medical Ltd.

The research report presents a comprehensive assessment of the market and contains thoughtful insights, facts, historical data, and statistically supported and industry-validated market data. It also contains projections using a suitable set of assumptions and methodologies. The research report provides analysis and information according to market segments such as geographies, application, and industry.

The report covers exhaust analysis on:

The regional analysis includes:

North America (U.S., Canada)

Latin America (Mexico. Brazil)

Western Europe (Germany, Italy, France, U.K, Spain)

Eastern Europe (Poland, Russia)

Asia-Pacific (China, India, ASEAN, Australia & New Zealand)

Japan

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The report is a compilation of first-hand information, qualitative and quantitative assessment by industry analysts, inputs from industry experts and industry participants across the value chain. The report provides in-depth analysis of parent market trends, macro-economic indicators and governing factors along with market attractiveness as per segments. The report also maps the qualitative impact of various market factors on market segments and geographies.

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Aesthetic Medicine And Cosmetic Surgery Market: Global Trends, Analysis and Forecast 2017 - 2027 - Markets Gazette 24

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The researchers added to polymer gels – Market Research Feed

§ December 10th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on The researchers added to polymer gels – Market Research Feed

Gel-like materials have a wide range of applications, especially in chemistry and medicine. However, their usefulness is sometimes limited by their inherent random and disordered nature. Researchers from the University of Tokyos Institute for Solid State Physics have found a way to produce a new kind of gel which overcomes this limitation. It is still malleable and adaptable like existing gels, but it has a more ordered structure, which can open up a new range of possible uses in various fields.When you hear the word gel, you probably conjure up the image of something viscous, like some cosmetics substances or the inside of a memory-foam mattress. But in the world of scientific research, gels have a more specific definition. Strictly speaking, gels are three-dimensional networks of polymerschains of moleculeswith microscopic pores between the chemical strands. The nature and arrangement of these polymers give gels different functions with common applications, such as chemical filtration or drug delivery.The creation of polymer network gels is difficult to control, so they are very disordered and contain many structural inconsistencies or defects. They are said to be heterogeneous, meaning their forms vary widely throughout their structures. However, Research Associate Xiang Li and colleagues have found a novel way to maintain a high level of order while fabricating polymer gels. The result is a homogeneous gel that is more consistent throughout its structure while still providing the benefits of a highly porous and malleable material.We demonstrated that its actually quite easy to synthesize an extremely homogeneous gel network, said Li. First, we tightly packed some star-shaped polymers together in a solvent and added some chemicals which, when activated, join these star polymers together. We activated the joining or cross-linking chemicals in a controlled manner; this in turn led to a more ordered polymer gel network than one might ordinarily expect from this kind of process.The fabrication process, based on a concept known as bond percolation, is very effective at producing ordered gel networksso much so that researchers feel it forces them to redefine what actually constitutes a gel. Previously a gel was assumed to contain disorder and defects, however these are no longer key properties. But all this work is not just for the sake of making something new; it has a strong purpose and it could lead to some interesting advancements.Ordered yet flexible gel networks could be used in applications like high-performance chemical filters, flexible sensors, mechanical actuators, controlled drug release and even ultraclear optical fibers, explained Li. We want to encourage others to build on our work here and find other ways to synthesize new polymer gels based on what we have started. Although our method was very specific, it lays the foundations for a more general experimental platform.The study is reported in Science Advances.

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NanoRobotics Market to Witness Comprehensive Growth by 2017-2026 – Statsflash

§ December 10th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on NanoRobotics Market to Witness Comprehensive Growth by 2017-2026 – Statsflash

According to Stratistics MRC, the Global Nanorobotics Market is accounted for $4.10 Billion in 2017 and is expected to reach $11.88 Billion by 2026 growing at a CAGR of 12.5% during the forecast period. Growing application of nanotechnology and regenerative medicine, rising acceptance and preferment of entrepreneurship and increasing investments by government and universities are the key factors fuelling the market growth. However, high manufacturing cost may hinder the growth of the market.

Nanorobotics is an evolving technology arena that creates robots or machines which have machinery near to the scale of a nanometre (109 meters). It denotes the nanotechnology engineering regulation of planning, designing, and building nanorobots, primarily from molecular components. Nanorobotics is an attractive new field, especially in medicine, which focus on directed drug delivery using nanoscale molecular machines.

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By Type, Nanomanipulator is expected to hold considerable market growth during the forecast period. Nanomanipulator is a specialized nanorobot and microscopic viewing system for working with objects on an extremely small scale. Nanomanipulators are mainly used to influence the atoms and molecules and were among the first nanorobotic systems to be commercially accessible. By geography, Europe dominated the highest market share due to rising aging population and rising governmental healthcare expenditure.

Some of the key players in Nanorobotics include Bruker, JEOL, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Ginkgo Bioworks, Oxford Instruments, EV Group, Imina Technologies, Toronto Nano Instrumentation, Klocke Nanotechnik, Kleindiek Nanotechnik, Xidex, Synthace, Park Systems, Smaract and Nanonics Imaging

Types Covered: Nanomanipulator Magnetically Guided Bacteria-Based Bio-Nanorobotics

Applications Covered: Biomedical Nanomedicine Mechanical Other Applications

Regions Covered: North Americao USo Canadao Mexico Europeo Germanyo UKo Italyo Franceo Spaino Rest of Europe Asia Pacifico Japano Chinao Indiao Australiao New Zealando South Koreao Rest of Asia Pacific South Americao Argentinao Brazilo Chileo Rest of South America Middle East & Africao Saudi Arabiao UAEo Qataro South Africao Rest of Middle East & Africa

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What our report offers: Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments Market share analysis of the top industry players Strategic recommendations for the new entrants Market forecasts for a minimum of 9 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations) Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements

Free Customization Offerings:All the customers of this report will be entitled to receive one of the following free customization options: Company Profilingo Comprehensive profiling of additional market players (up to 3)o SWOT Analysis of key players (up to 3) Regional Segmentationo Market estimations, Forecasts and CAGR of any prominent country as per the clients interest (Note: Depends of feasibility check) Competitive Benchmarkingo Benchmarking of key players based on product portfolio, geographical presence, and strategic alliances

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NanoRobotics Market to Witness Comprehensive Growth by 2017-2026 - Statsflash

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New Blood Test to Identity People with High BP at Night – The Quint

§ December 10th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on New Blood Test to Identity People with High BP at Night – The Quint

(This story was auto-published from a syndicated feed. No part of the story has been edited by FIT.)

(India, and the Capital especially, has been in an air pollution crisis. How has the hazardous air #pollution impacted you? Write down your #PollutionKaSolution and send it to us at FIT@thequint.com. )

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Some People Think Putting a Suitcase on the Bed is Disgusting. But is it Actually Dangerous? – http://hamodia.com

§ December 8th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Some People Think Putting a Suitcase on the Bed is Disgusting. But is it Actually Dangerous? – http://hamodia.com

(The Washington Post) -

Thursday, December 5, 2019 at 3:35 pm | '"

It is unlikely that you come home from a trip and stand on top of your bed still wearing your street shoes. Why would you? Your shoes are covered in God-knows-what, and your bed is a sacred space.

For some travelers, putting their suitcase on their bed is just as offensive. The wheels of our luggage tread the same soiled path as our shoes, rolling through airport bathrooms, sidewalks and public transportation. To these travelers, the thought of plopping said suitcase atop the same place for sleeping is an affront to humanity.

While it might sound gross to put a worldly bag on your bed, is it actually harmful to your health? According to Phyllis Kozarsky, an expert travel health consultant for the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions travelers health branch and the chief medical editor of the CDC reference guide Health Information for the International Traveler, most public health professionals dont consider luggage a major transmitter of disease.

We have not identified outbreaks related to dirty luggage, Kozarsky says.

Where travelers may benefit from cleaning their luggage is if theres a suspicion that their hotel room has a bedbug infestation.

Then they certainly would benefit by vacuuming out their luggage or cleaning it after they returned home, Kozarsky says. But otherwise, she says, the bag is not typically a source of transmission of illness.

Even if your luggage touching your bed wont hurt you, you might still be plain old revolted. After all, travel is a germ-addled experience.

You have people carrying all types of different germs. Some of them are sick, and you now have them populating these public travel places, says Colleen Costello, CEO of Vital Vio, a company that makes antibacterial LED lights.

Your fellow travelers have to touch all the same things you have to touch, from the TSA checkpoint to the airplane, the train ticketing machine to the handrail in your train car.

They have microscopic germs on them. And, realistically, [janitorial staff] may be getting to clean them rather infrequently, Costello says of the many touch points involved in travel. Everything you bring into these public spaces can basically pick up or drop off different germs, and you cant see them. Theres no way to really know when you or your personal belongings are exposed.

For your peace of mind, Costello recommends giving your bag a quick disinfection or storing it on a luggage rack. Technically speaking, you could go beyond disinfecting your luggage wheels and sanitize the rest of your travel experience the airplane tray table, entertainment screen, armrests, hotel room door and remote control. But Kozarsky, the CDC travel medicine expert, doesnt vouch for that lifestyle.

Its hard to keep up with every doorknob, every railing. Think of what you do between your home and your destination, Kozarsky says. You can become a little neurotic that way.

We live in a germ-filled world. Coming into contact with bacteria is part of life, and trying to sanitize every travel accessory or surface we touch can turn into a Sisyphean task.

Instead, make sure youre washing your hands with soap and water after using the restroom and before you eat. Carry hand sanitizer for the times you dont have access to soap and water. Avoid touching your eyes and mouth as much as possible. And remember: Dodging illness isnt a perfect science. Getting a cold from time to time is human.

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Microscopic structure of bone – the Haversian system …

§ December 8th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Microscopic structure of bone – the Haversian system …

Microscopic structure of bone - the Haversian system (video) |Khan Academy

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