Page 11234..1020..»

You are currently browsing the Nano Medicine category

The Top European Biotech Investment Rounds in September – Labiotech.eu

§ October 13th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on The Top European Biotech Investment Rounds in September – Labiotech.eu

Initial public offerings by European biotech companies were hot in September, and companies developing technologies including sequencing and bioinformatics received big private and public investments.

Last month, European and Israeli biotech companies raised almost 1.6B in 43 deals, which included initial public offerings (IPOs) and private financing rounds. This was more than triple the total catch in August, which saw 466.8M raised in 26 deals.

Roughly half of the cash 815.8M came from five IPOs. The star position went to the UK sequencing heavyweight Oxford Nanopore Technologies, which took home 407.4M (330M) from its listing on the London Stock Exchange. A Nasdaq IPO worth 302.6M ($350M) flushed compatriot firm Exscientia with cash to scale up its artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted drug discovery technology.

IPOs in European stock markets also went to Afyren, NH TherAguix, and Genetic Analysis, which respectively are developing sustainable chemicals manufacturing, nanomedicine products, and diagnostics based on the microbiome.

Leading the private fundraisers,

Our members receive the following benefits:

Read the original:
The Top European Biotech Investment Rounds in September - Labiotech.eu

Read the Rest...

Creating smart nanomachines to detect highly invasive cancer after surgery and prevent recurrence – EurekAlert

§ October 13th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Creating smart nanomachines to detect highly invasive cancer after surgery and prevent recurrence – EurekAlert

image:Left: Primary tumor or overt metastasis Center: Center: Pre-metastatic niche Right: Post-surgical wound view more

Credit: 2021 Innovation Center of NanoMedicine

Summary: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is an enzyme required for cancer cells to metastasize/invade, and cancer cells with higher MMP activity have higher metastasis ability and progress quickly. In this study, we created polymersomes (smart nanomachines) that act specifically in tissues that overproduce MMPs, prevent cancer metastasis, and developed a method to remove residual tumor tissue that could not be visually confirmed after surgery. We simultaneously loaded the cell division inhibitor colchicine and the MMP inhibitor marimastat into MMPs-responsive polymersomes as an enzymatically transformable nanomachine designed to achieve transformation following dePEGylation by cleavage of the inserted substrate peptide by MMPs. The effect on malignant tumors with high MMPs activity was evaluated. During transformation, nanomachines with exposed guanidine residues easily penetrate into cells, and at the same time, by releasing the contained drugs, it exerts an anti-cancer effect. Evaluating drug uptake using HT1080 cells derived from human fibrosarcoma that overproduce MMPs, studying pharmacokinetic and nano-bio interaction using a confocal laser scanning biomicroscope and evaluating metastasis inhibitory effect using triple-negative breast cancer transplantation model, the results were published in Advanced Materials (IF = 30.849 in 2021).

J. Li, Z. Ge, K. Toh, X. Liu, A. Dirisala, W. Ke, P. Wen, H. Zhou, Z. Wang, S. Xiao, J. F. R. Van Guyse, T. A Tockary, J. Xie, D. G.-Carter, H. Kinoh, S. Uchida, Y. Anraku, and K. Kataoka, Advanced Materials, 2021. DOI: 10.1002/adma.202105254 URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adma.202105254

October 8, 2021, Kawasaki (Japan) and Hefei (China): The Innovation Center of NanoMedicine, Kawasaki Institute of Industrial Promotion (Director General: Kazunori KATAOKA, location: Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki-City; abbreviated name: iCONM), in collaboration with the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Chemistry (USTC: University of Science and Technology), has created nanomachines that detect MMPs (matrix metalloproteinases), a principal enzyme for cancer cells to invade normal tissue, and deliver anticancer drugs according to an announcement in the journal Advanced Materials (IF = 30.849). As it can target highly invasive cancer cells, it is expected to inhibit cancer metastasis and recurrence.

Cancer is known as a malignant tumor due to its characteristics of metastasis, recurrence, and invasion, and preventing them is one of the most effective ways for treatment. When cancer cells metastasize, they need to pass through (invade) normal tissues, and in doing so, they use extracellular proteases (proteolytic enzymes) called MMPs to destroy the fibrous tissue (matrix) that binds cells to cells and tissues to tissues. In this study, we focused on tissues and cells that overproduce MMPs and incorporated the cell division inhibitor colchicine and the MMP inhibitor marimastat into MMPs-responsive polymersomes as an enzymatically transformable nanomachine (ETN). The ETN was designed to possess an amino acid sequence that serves as a specific cleavage site for MMPs and thus be capable of releasing the PEG and exposing the guanidine residue after cleavage. In the drug uptake experiment using human fibrosarcoma-derived HT1080 cells, we found that the fluorescently labeled ETN (Cy5-ETN) had a 10-fold higher uptake than that of an inert vehicle without enzymatic transformation behavior. High cellular uptake enabled strong cytotoxicity of colchicine-loaded ETN with IC50 = 0.015 M compared to the inert vehicle with IC50 = 0.402 M. Observation of mice treated with ETN using confocal laser scanning biomicroscopy showed no leakage out of blood vessels in the auricle and normal liver; strikingly, the nanomachines were found to extensively invade the tumor-associated tissues in breast cancer with high MMPs expression.

In pharmacological experiments with mice, we evaluated the antitumor effect for primary and secondary tumor using MDA-MB-231/LM2 (human) and 4T1 (mice) triple-negative breast cancer models. As a result, the ETN simultaneously encapsulating with colchicine and marimastat had a strong antitumor effect and prolonged survival in both triple-negative breast cancer models. In addition, on the basis of metastasis-prone phenotype of this model after orthotopic transplantation, the ETN was also confirmed to efficiently inhibit lung metastasis because of residual tumor targetability. Our results prove an applicable technology for not only to cancers but also to other diseases with high expression of MMPs.

Kawasaki Institute of Industrial Promotion (KIIP) Kawasaki Institute of Industrial Promotion was established in 1988 funded 100% from Kawasaki City for the purpose of coping with the hollowing out of industry and changes in the demand structure. In order to realize a higher level of market development, transforming R&D type companies, training technological capabilities to support it, human resources development, understanding market needs, etc., by utilizing the functions of the Kawasaki, KIIP has been contributing to revitalize the local economy by promoting exchanges of local industry information, advancing technology and corporate exchanges with establishment of a R&D institutions, developing creative human resources through workshops and promoting businesses such as expanding sales channels through exhibition business. https://www.kawasaki-net.ne.jp/

Innovation Center of NanoMedicine (iCONM) Innovation Center of NanoMedicine (iCONM) started its operation in April 2015 as a core research center in life science field at King SkyFront on the request of Kawasaki city that KIIP utilized national policies as a business operator and proposer. It is a unique research center that the world has ever seen which is designed for the purpose of promoting open innovation through industry-academia-government/medical-engineering collaboration, prepared with state-of-the-art facilities and experimental equipment, that enables comprehensive research and development from organic synthesis / microfabrication to preclinical testing. iCONM: https://iconm.kawasaki-net.ne.jp/en/index.html

University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) The University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) is a public research university of China with scientific and technological research as core strength, under the leadership of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). Its foundation in 1958 was hailed as "A Major Event in the History of Chinese Education and Science.". USTC has three National Research Institutions and 6 State Key Laboratories and 18 Key Laboratories of the CAS. USTC actively promotes cooperation and exchange with around 100 universities and research institutions in more than 30 nations and regions. In recent years, USTC is ranked in the world's top 100 universities in the most-widely read university rankings. USTC: http://en.ustc.edu.cn

October 8, 2021

Advanced Materials

Enzymatically Transformable Polymersome-Based Nanotherapeutics to Eliminate Minimal Relapsable Cancer

7-Oct-2021

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

See the original post:
Creating smart nanomachines to detect highly invasive cancer after surgery and prevent recurrence - EurekAlert

Read the Rest...

Three ‘Oscars’ of science awarded to UNSW researchers – UNSW Newsroom

§ October 13th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Three ‘Oscars’ of science awarded to UNSW researchers – UNSW Newsroom

UNSW Sydney researchers were awarded three prizes at last nights prestigious 2021 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes.

Scientia Professor Justin Gooding, UNSW Science, and Professor Maria Kavallaris, Childrens Cancer Institute and UNSW Medicine & Health, were recognised for their work on a breakthrough in 3D bioprinting that will be a game-changer in cancer research.

The team won the ANSTO Eureka Prize for Innovative Use of Technology for developing a highly innovative 3D bioprinter that allows cancer researchers to rapidly produce 3D cultures and build more complex in vitro cancer models than ever before. The team comprises researchers from UNSW Chemistry, Australian Centre for NanoMedicine, Childrens Cancer Institute and Inventia Life Science Pty Ltd, which includes Scientia Professor Justin Gooding, Professor Maria Kavallaris, Dr Julio Ribeiro, Dr Aidan O'Mahony, Dr Robert Utama and Dr Lakmali Atapattu.

Prof. Kavallaris said winning the Eureka Prize has been part of an incredible and highly successful collaboration to realise a vision to grow human tumours and screen them against hundreds of drugs to identify the right treatment for the right patient.

As a cancer survivor and researcher, the ability to identify drugs that work to give to patients and avoid the use of unnecessary treatments has great potential to improve outcomes for both childhood and adult cancers, Prof. Kavallaris said.

Prof. Gooding said it has been an incredibly exciting journey thatreached a real high receiving the Eureka Prize.

The technology addresses an incredibly important problem in terms of potentially playing an important role in personalising cancer treatment. What we have achieved would not have been possible if we were not part of a great team from both industry and academia who worked in an integrated way towards a common vision. For me, it really shows what universities and companies can do together when they truly work together as partners.

Scientia Professor Justin Gooding and Professor Maria Kavallaris. Image: UNSW

Dr Mark Ooi, UNSW Science, in collaboration with a team from the University of Wollongong, Western Sydney University and the University of Tasmania, won the NSW Environment, Energy and Science (DPIE) Eureka Prize for Applied Environmental Research.

Dr Ooi is part of the NSW Bushfire Risk Management Research Hub which was commissioned by the NSW state government to help it understand what happened during the devastating 2019-20 Australian bushfires. The consortiums findings addressed major knowledge gaps relating to droughts, fuel dynamics, and the social and environmental impacts of the fires, directly influencing many of the NSW Bushfire Inquiry recommendations and setting the future direction for fire management.

"Winning the Eureka Prize is an incredible honour, and for a number of us in the NSW Bushfire Risk Management Research Hub at early and mid-career stages, it is a career highlight, Dr Ooi said.

"The 2019-20 bushfires really highlighted the kind of extremes that are possible as the climate changes, and the Bushfire Research Hub team's submission to the NSW Inquiry showed how science can be conducted collaboratively and rapidly to provide evidence of impacts at massive scales.

Associate Professor Kevin Elphinstone led a team from UNSW Engineering recognised in the Department of Defence Eureka Prize for Outstanding Science in Safeguarding Australia for their work creating simple, secure and trustworthy computing technologies.

The Cross Domain Desktop Compositor (CDDC) team comprises researchers from UNSW,CSIROs Data61, University of Melbourne and the Defence Science and Technology Group. By combining a world-class secure operating system with novel hardware architecture, the team has found a new method for keeping sensitive information secure from internet attacks.

Its an honour for the team to receive a Eureka Prize. The CDDC collaboration is a great example of Australian universities, Defence and CSIRO coming together to create ground-breaking technologies, A/Prof. Elphinstone said.

Data security in an internet connected world is an extremely challenging problem. Completely disconnecting computer users working in secure environments from insecure networks reduces decision making awareness and operational efficiency. The team has created a flexible technology for secure viewing and controlled sharing of data between extremely secure computing environments and insecure networks like the Internet.

Presented annually by the Australian Museum, 16 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes are awarded across four categories including research and innovation, leadership, science engagement and school science. UNSW had more than 10 finalists in this years Eureka Prizes.

Go here to read the rest:
Three 'Oscars' of science awarded to UNSW researchers - UNSW Newsroom

Read the Rest...

Millions Of Microscopic Thieves Steal Essential Medicine From World-Famous Shedd Aquarium – Themississippilink

§ October 13th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Millions Of Microscopic Thieves Steal Essential Medicine From World-Famous Shedd Aquarium – Themississippilink

Scientists at Chicagos famous Shedd Aquarium were stumped by the disappearance of anti-parasitic medications until they found the sneaky culprits microbes.

Shedd Aquariums quarantine habitats behind the scenes are a first stop for animals entering the building, allowing us to safely welcome them in a way that ensures outside pathogens are not introduced to the animals that already call Shedd home, said Bill Van Bonn of Shedd Aquarium.

During the quarantine process, all the animals are bathed in water containing anti-parasitic chloroquine phosphate medication to treat a variety of illnesses. After adding the medication directly to the water, the aquarium staff measure its concentration.

They need to maintain a certain concentration in the habitats to treat the animals effectively, said microbiologist Erica Hartmann of Northwestern University. But they noticed the chloroquine was mysteriously vanishing. They would add the correct amount, then measure it, and the concentration would be much lower than expected to the point where it wouldnt work anymore.

Hartmann and her colleagues worked with Van Bonn to catch the thief, publishing a study that appeared recently in the journal Science of the Total Environment.

Together, they conducted microbial and chemical analyses of the saltwater aquarium systems. What they found was not just one thief but millions of microbes that were feasting on the nitrogen suspended in the water.

Hartmann, who noted that carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and phosphorous are the building blocks of life, said when the research team looked for the medicine, they found it had been degraded. The piece of the molecule containing the nitrogen was gone. It would be the equivalent [of] eating only the pickles out of a cheeseburger and leaving the rest behind, she said.

The team took samples from the water, the sides of the habitats and from pipes leading to and from the habitats. Testing these samples uncovered 754 different microbes. Hartmann pointed out that microbes live in water and on the surfaces of the habitats.

If you have ever had an aquarium at home, you probably noticed grime growing on the sides. People sometimes add snails or algae-eating fish to help clean the sides. So we wanted to study whatever was in the water and whatever was stuck to the sides of the surfaces, she said.

During the investigation, the scientists not only determined the microbial basis for the disappearance of the medicine but also identified the responsible microbes. Hartmanns team cultured the microbes and fed them chloroquine as their only source of carbon, but the results were inconclusive. Next, they conducted a sensitive analytical chemistry study of the degraded chloroquine. If the chloroquine was being eaten, we were essentially looking at the leftovers, she said. Thats when we realized that nitrogen was the key driver.

Of all the microbes collected, the researchers identified at least 21 different suspects clinging to the inside of the habitats outlet pipes. Some of these microbes have never been studied before.

Hartmann said the pipes might need to be scrubbed or replaced to keep the chloroquine from disappearing. Also, regular switching between freshwater and saltwater may be a solution because microbes are typically sensitive to one or the other.

Edited by Sin Speakman and Kristen Butler

Read the original here:
Millions Of Microscopic Thieves Steal Essential Medicine From World-Famous Shedd Aquarium - Themississippilink

Read the Rest...

What is Trending in Injectable Microscopic Robots Market? What are the Strategies to Boost Business in Near Years? | Global Players in the Industry:…

§ October 13th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on What is Trending in Injectable Microscopic Robots Market? What are the Strategies to Boost Business in Near Years? | Global Players in the Industry:…

In terms of revenue, global injectable microscopic robots market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 19.89% over the forecast period. Latest added Injectable Microscopic Robots Market research study by Absolute Markets Insights (AMI) offers detailed product outlook and elaborates market review till 2030. The market Study is segmented by key regions that is accelerating the marketization. At present, the market is sharping its presence and some of the key players in the study are Bionaut Labs, Merck KGaA, Ginkgo Bioworks, amongst others. The study is a perfect mix of qualitative and quantitative Market data collected and validated majorly through primary data and secondary sources.

Get Sample PDF (including COVID19 Impact Analysis) of Market Report @https://www.absolutemarketsinsights.com/request_sample.php?id=913

This report studies the Injectable Microscopic Robots Market size, industry status and forecast, competition landscape and growth opportunity. This research report categorizes the Injectable Microscopic Robots Market by companies, region, type and end-use industry.

Scroll down 100s of data Tables, charts and graphs spread through Pages and in-depth Table of Content on Global Injectable Microscopic Robots Market By Type(Bacteria-Based, Magnetically Guided, Probe-Based); By Application (Medical Surgery, Neurosurgery, Oncology , Dentistry, Drug Delivery, Tumour Removal, Real-Time Imaging, Others); By Region (North America (U.S., Canada, Mexico, Rest Of North America), Europe (France, The UK, Spain, Germany, Italy, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Sweden, Norway, Belgium, The Netherlands, Luxembourg, Rest Of Europe), Asia Pacific (China, Japan, India, New Zealand, Australia, South Korea, Southeast Asia, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Rest Of Southeast Asia, Rest Of Asia Pacific, Middle East & Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Kuwait, South Africa, Rest Of Middle East & Africa) Latin America (Brazil, Argentina, Rest Of Latin America)) Global Insights, Growth, Size, Comparative Analysis, Trends And Forecast, 2021 2030. Early buyers will get 10% customization on study.

To Get This Report at an Attractive Cost, Click Here @https://www.absolutemarketsinsights.com/ask_for_discount.php?id=913

To Avail deep insights of Injectable Microscopic Robots Market Size, competition landscape is provided i.e. Revenue Analysis (M $US) by Company (2018-2020), Segment Revenue Market Share (%) by Players (2018-2020) and further a qualitative analysis is made towards market concentration rate, product/service differences, new entrants and the technological trends in future.

Unlock new opportunities in Injectable Microscopic Robots Market; the latest release from Absolute Markets Insights (AMI) highlights the key market trends significant to the growth prospects, Let us know if any specific players or list of players needs to consider to gain better insights.

Industry Trends

The medicine and healthcare sector has seen significant advancements in the last 25 years. Individuals have immensely benefited from technologies such as MRI, CT and X-ray, amongst others. Both in diagnostics and treatments, the medicine industry has seen a considerable investment from both private and public entities. The field of robotics is slowly being adopted in medicine, especially for applications such as surgery and imaging, amongst others. Medical nano robots have already been deployed for imaging and drug delivery purposes. However, researchers and medical professionals are closely monitoring the progress of a major solution which has the ability to provide targeted delivery for drugs, tumour removal and acute imaging in areas which cant be accessed by the current technology. This solution is referred to as injectable microscopic robotics. Microscopic robots can be injected into the human body, regardless of the age of the person, and can be manoeuvred to reach the specific destination for various applications. The growing demand for accurate drug delivery and tumour removal, coupled with compact medical imaging, is expected to propel the growth of the injectable microscopic robots market in the coming years.

The COVID-19 pandemic has drastically affected business operations, as well as individual lifestyles, across the globe. Despite the roll out of the coronavirus in almost all countries, individuals are still being affected by viral mutations, and comorbid individuals are feeling the brunt of the virus. Scientists are increasingly focussing on the treatment of COVID-19 patients who have other ailments like cancer, diabetes, hypertension and cardiac issues, amongst others. Injectable robots are expected to assist the medical professionals in medical diagnosis of various complications, and can also used for delivery of drugs for therapeutics to the required location with greater accuracy. Hence, the pandemic is expected to have a positive impact on the global injectable microscopic robots market.

Global Injectable Microscopic Robots Market

Injectable Microscopic Robots Market: By Type

Injectable Microscopic Robots Market: By Application

Injectable Microscopic Robots Market: By Region

The large scale Injectable Microscopic Robots Market report defines CAGR value fluctuation during the forecast period of 2021-2030 for the market. The market research analysis conducted in this report provides an examination of various market segments that are relied upon to monitor the fastest development amid the estimated forecast frame. The company profiles leading to all the chief and dominating market players and brands that are taking steps such as product launches, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions have been included in the report. Injectable Microscopic Robots Market research report is a window to the industry which explains what market definition, classifications, applications, engagements and market trends are.

The research report of the global Injectable Microscopic Robots market provides answers to the following key questions:

Do You Have Any Query Or Specific Requirement? Ask to Our Industry Expert @https://www.absolutemarketsinsights.com/enquiry_before_buying.php?id=913

About Absolute Markets Insights :

Absolute Markets Insights assists in providing accurate and latest trends related to consumer demand, consumer behavior, sales, and growth opportunities, for the better understanding of the market, thus helping in product designing, featuring, and demanding forecasts. Our experts provide you the end-products that can provide transparency, actionable data, cross-channel deployment program, performance, accurate testing capabilities and the ability to promote ongoing optimization. From the in-depth analysis and segregation, we serve our clients to fulfill their immediate as well as ongoing research requirements. Minute analysis impact large decisions and thereby the source of business intelligence (BI) plays an important role, which keeps us upgraded with current and upcoming market scenarios.

Contact Us:

Contact Name: Shreyas Tanna

Phone: +91-740-024-2424

Absolute Markets Insights sales@absolutemarketsinsights.com

View original post here:
What is Trending in Injectable Microscopic Robots Market? What are the Strategies to Boost Business in Near Years? | Global Players in the Industry:...

Read the Rest...

‘Once-in-a-generation’ find reveals microscopic fossil in amber – jacksonprogress-argus

§ October 13th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on ‘Once-in-a-generation’ find reveals microscopic fossil in amber – jacksonprogress-argus

Let's hear it for the trailblazers.

The research, discoveries and contributions of these individuals cannot be understated -- they can change lives, enhance understanding and shift perspectives.

My favorite was the creative approach used in the discoveries of receptors for temperature and touch. The Nobel Prize-winning research by David Julius and Ardem Patapoutian was rooted in how chili peppers cause us to feel the heat.

We're fortunate to have a front row seat to history. And who knows? Perhaps some of the fascinating findings shared here each week may one day receive such recognition.

Microscopic tardigrades -- you may know them as water bears -- were around long before humans, and they'll probably outlive us, too.

These tiny creatures, which are the smallest animals with legs, have survived five mass extinction events over 500 million years. But they don't leave a lot of fossils behind -- not ones we can see, anyway.

All of those missions to the moon and Mars are paying off as we learn surprising new things about our planetary neighbors.

China's Chang'e-5 mission brought back the first fresh lunar samples in more than 40 years to Earth last December. Now, scientists have had a chance to study the 2 billion-year-old rocks and determine that the moon was volcanically active more recently than they thought.

Modern technology is illuminating the secrets of royalty.

An analysis using X-rays has revealed that an obsidian "spirit mirror" used by John Dee, a confidant and adviser of Queen Elizabeth I, is actually a product of the Aztec culture. The nearly 500-year-old mirror, made from volcanic glass, had spiritual significance for the Aztecs -- and Dee used it in a spooky way.

Success! An email has been sent to with a link to confirm list signup.

Error! There was an error processing your request.

Researchers measured "earthshine," which is when "the dark face of the Moon catches Earth's reflected glow and returns that light," according to NASA.

Our planet's "ghostly light" has dimmed dramatically over the last few years, so much so that the scientists thought their data was flawed.

The culprit? A side effect of the ongoing climate crises.

On the exoplanet WASP-76b, located 640 light-years from Earth, it's so hot that iron falls like rain from the sky.

On the dayside of the planet, which faces a nearby star, temperatures exceed 4,400 degrees Fahrenheit (2,426 degrees Celsius).

Because of its close proximity to the star, WASP-76b completes one orbit around it every 1.8 Earth days -- soaking up thousands of times the radiation that Earth receives from the sun.

There's a little more to see:

Like what you've read? Oh, but there's more. Sign up here to receive in your inbox the next edition of Wonder Theory, brought to you by CNN Space and Science writer Ashley Strickland, who finds wonder in planets beyond our solar system and discoveries from the ancient world.

& 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.

Original post:
'Once-in-a-generation' find reveals microscopic fossil in amber - jacksonprogress-argus

Read the Rest...

Market Survey Details Developments in the Injectable Microscopic Robots Industry; Forecast To 2030 with Top Key Players, Regions, Type and…

§ October 13th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Market Survey Details Developments in the Injectable Microscopic Robots Industry; Forecast To 2030 with Top Key Players, Regions, Type and…

Global Injectable Microscopic Robots Market Research Report initially provides an overview of the industry that covers definition, applications and technology, post which the report explores into the international players in the market. The report profiles the key players in the industry, along with a detailed analysis of their individual positions against the global landscape. The study conducts SWOT analysis to evaluate strengths and weaknesses of the key players in the market. The researcher provides an extensive analysis of the Injectable Microscopic Robots Market size, share, trends, overall earnings, gross revenue, and profit margin to accurately draw a forecast and provide expert insights to investors to keep them updated with the trends in the market.

In terms of revenue, global injectable microscopic robots market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 19.89% over the forecast period. The study analyses the market in terms of revenue across all the major regions, which have been bifurcated into countries.

Download a PDF Sample Copy of this Report: https://www.absolutemarketsinsights.com/request_sample.php?id=913

Major Market Players Profiled in the Injectable Microscopic Robots Market Report include: Bionaut Labs, Merck KGaA, Ginkgo Bioworks

A detailed overview of the purchasing criteria and difficulties confronted in the Injectable Microscopic Robots business sector is also elaborated in this report. It likewise constitutes a broad investigation of the restraints on the market, business sector structure and the business pattern of the Injectable Microscopic Robots market. Meetings and interviews with the leading market participants have been used in order to present primary information regarding the market. Furthermore, this report gives a complete review of the magnitude and application scope of the market around the world. The reportincludesthe completely examined and evaluated data of the noticeable companies and their situation in the market considering impact of Coronavirus. The measured tools including SWOT analysis, Porters five powers analysis, and assumption return debt were utilized while separating the improvement of the key players performing in the market.

The medicine and healthcare sector has seen significant advancements in the last 25 years. Individuals have immensely benefited from technologies such as MRI, CT and X-ray, amongst others. Both in diagnostics and treatments, the medicine industry has seen a considerable investment from both private and public entities. The field of robotics is slowly being adopted in medicine, especially for applications such as surgery and imaging, amongst others. Medical nano robots have already been deployed for imaging and drug delivery purposes. However, researchers and medical professionals are closely monitoring the progress of a major solution which has the ability to provide targeted delivery for drugs, tumour removal and acute imaging in areas which cant be accessed by the current technology. This solution is referred to as injectable microscopic robotics. Microscopic robots can be injected into the human body, regardless of the age of the person, and can be manoeuvred to reach the specific destination for various applications. The growing demand for accurate drug delivery and tumour removal, coupled with compact medical imaging, is expected to propel the growth of the injectable microscopic robots market in the coming years.

The COVID-19 pandemic has drastically affected business operations, as well as individual lifestyles, across the globe. Despite the roll out of the coronavirus in almost all countries, individuals are still being affected by viral mutations, and comorbid individuals are feeling the brunt of the virus. Scientists are increasingly focussing on the treatment of COVID-19 patients who have other ailments like cancer, diabetes, hypertension and cardiac issues, amongst others. Injectable robots are expected to assist the medical professionals in medical diagnosis of various complications, and can also used for delivery of drugs for therapeutics to the required location with greater accuracy. Hence, the pandemic is expected to have a positive impact on the global injectable microscopic robots market.

If You Have Any Query/Inquiry, Ask Our Expert: https://www.absolutemarketsinsights.com/enquiry_before_buying.php?id=913

The report provides both, qualitative and quantitative research of global injectable microscopic robots market, as well as provides comprehensive insights and development methods adopted by the key contenders. The report also offers extensive research on the key players in this market and details on the competitiveness of these players. Key business strategies such as mergers and acquisitions (M&A), affiliations, collaborations, and contracts adopted by these major market participants are also recognized and analysed in the report. For each company, the report studies their global presence, competitors, service offerings and specification amongst others.

Why the Injectable Microscopic Robots Market Report is Beneficial?

Request for Customization: https://www.absolutemarketsinsights.com/request_for_customization.php?id=913

Global Injectable Microscopic Robots Market

By Type

By Application

By Region

For More Information Click: https://www.absolutemarketsinsights.com/reports/Global-Injectable-Microscopic-Robots-Market-20212029-913

Contact Us:

Company: Absolute Markets Insights

Email Id: sales@absolutemarketsinsights.com

Phone: +91-740-024-2424

Contact Name: Shreyas Tanna

Website: https://www.absolutemarketsinsights.com

More here:
Market Survey Details Developments in the Injectable Microscopic Robots Industry; Forecast To 2030 with Top Key Players, Regions, Type and...

Read the Rest...

‘I was 15 or 16 when a programme called The X-Files came out …’ – The Irish Times

§ October 13th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on ‘I was 15 or 16 when a programme called The X-Files came out …’ – The Irish Times

When I was a teenager I became very interested in crime programmes that were always on in our house like Cracker, Taggart, Inspector Morse. I was interested in the investigations around those and the psychology around it all.

Chief State pathologist Dr Linda Mulligan spoke with The Irish Times recently and told us about the path that led her to a career in forensic pathology.

When I was 15 or 16 a programme called The X-Files came out. I remember watching an episode one day when Dr Scully was doing an autopsy and I thought wow, that is an actual job that you can do. I was always interested in biology and science classes.

Dr Mulligan attended a UCD open day where she spoke with one of the medical students and that helped her decide on her future career.

So I worked really hard from transition year until my Leaving Cert and managed to get the points to do medicine in UCD.

After training to be a doctor for six years, she did her internship in Ireland before developing an interest in oncology and histology, which is the study of tissues and their structure.

I decided to go to Australia for two years and I worked in clinical medicine there, but again my interest went back to radiation oncology and working in the bone marrow transplant unit. Theyre very much focused on the microscopic examination of tissues and the cellular level of stuff.

An opportunity arose for her to train as a histopathologist in Ireland. Histopathologists are doctors who diagnose and study disease through the examination of cells and tissue samples.

When I was a medical student I did a research graduate [course] with Professor Marie Cassidy, or Dr Cassidy as she was then.

Professor Cassidy was the first woman to hold the position of State Pathologist of Ireland, a role she held from 2004 to 2018.

Professor Cassidy had given us a lecture at the Pathology Society and of course I was a member of the society. I approached her afterwards and just said, Look, Im quite interested in this area and Is there a possibility for research?

She was really supportive. I spent about two months with her one summer and got to see her day-to-day work and to follow her around. I found it fascinating that she was able to examine somebody from head to toe and then come up with answers to questions the family had and answers to questions the guards had.

She was able to help so many people just by this examination and I just thought that was brilliant.

That sparked my interest in forensics. I always returned to that area all through my training. Even in histopathology I was always interested in autopsy practice. I loved the way it was able to answer a lot of questions and looked at the bigger picture of the whole body as an organism.

Once her histopathology training ended an opportunity arose for her to work with Professor Cassidy and Dr Michael Curtis in the office of the state pathologist.

I was very lucky when my histopathology training ended that an opportunity came up for me to work with Professor Cassidy and Dr Curtis.

Dr Mulligan is committed to developing a focused strategic plan for her office, including participating in the establishment of a sustainable national autopsy service.

She explained that there is currently no established path for doctors wishing to train as forensic pathologists but that this is an area that is being addressed.

When you become a doctor there is no option to get onto a training scheme for forensic pathologists in Ireland, explains Dr Mulligan.

There might be an option to train as a radiologist or in histopathology but there is no option to get onto a training scheme for forensic pathology.

It makes it difficult recruit and train forensic pathologists. Were working very closely to progress that with the Royal College of Physicians and the Medical Council.

As with so many other parts of the health service, Covid-19 had a big impact on the work of the state pathologist.

Covid-19 brought a focus back onto how useful the autopsy is as a tool for medical knowledge and development; for knowing how a disease works in the body, particularly of those who unfortunately it led to their demise. A focus has come onto autopsy because of the pandemic.

There was nothing positive about the death toll from this pandemic but, as medical professionals, we need to look at what we have learned from it and how we can fight the disease and focus learning in order to save lives in the future. That is what the practice of medicine is about at the end of the day.

When some people think of forensic pathology they think of the process involved with determining the cause of death of an individual. But there is more to the science of forensics than that.

Forensic pathology is a very specialised and niche area of medicine but there is a far wider world of forensics out there. Were a very small part of a death investigation process.

Forensic Science Ireland is the lab-based practice where they do all the DNA analysis, the cold case reviews, blood pattern analysis, toxicology and that kind of work. There are plenty of forensic science opportunities for those interested.

An Garda Siochna have the technical bureau with forensic photographers who specialise in photographing scenes of crime and fingerprint and ballistic experts. There are whole range of science-based jobs you can go into and specialise in with plenty of courses. A general science degree is a very good place to start as well as the specific forensic science courses.

When you see forensic pathologists on a TV show they are sort of distant and away from the investigation and that can be true in real life but we do have the opportunity to attend inquests where there are questions that the family have.

That is probably the interface where I always feel we provide the most help because families can talk to us directly while were giving our evidence and they can ask questions that are on their minds, if they havent been answered in the report we give to the coroner.

And that is one aspect of the job that might not always be in the public eye but that can be very valuable for families seeking answers at a very difficult, stressful and emotional time.

That is the opportunity to explain to them, hopefully in a way that is not too complicated or technical, about what happened and what the last events of their loved ones lives were.

I would hope they get comfort from that. We spend a lot of time and effort making sure our reports answer all their questions. I think that is so important for the grieving process.

Being a forensic pathologist is not for everybody. There is a lot to take on board but if youre able for that were always happy to answer questions and help you on your path.

Dr Mulligan will speak about careers in bio and medical science at Higher Options 2021

Visit link:
'I was 15 or 16 when a programme called The X-Files came out ...' - The Irish Times

Read the Rest...

FDA Approves Tavneos as Add-on Therapy for Severe MPA, GPA – ANCA Vasculitis News

§ October 13th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on FDA Approves Tavneos as Add-on Therapy for Severe MPA, GPA – ANCA Vasculitis News

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approvedTavneos (avacopan) as an add-on therapy for people with severe active microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), the two most common forms of ANCA-associated vasculitis.

The approval comes after an advisory committee narrowly supported avacopans approval in the U.S., promptingChemoCentryxto file an amended application with additional data.

Tavneos is the first approved treatment for AAVin over a decade, and marks the first FDA approval of an oral complement 5a receptor inhibitor for AAV.

Today is a momentous day in the history of ChemoCentryx; the culmination of decades of effort aimed at offering new hope to patients with this and other debilitating and deadly diseases, Thomas J. Schall, PhD, president and CEO of ChemoCentryx, said in a press release.

Tavneos approval was based on findings from the pivotal ADVOCATE Phase 3 clinical trial (NCT02994927), which showedTavneos to be an effective alternative to prednisone a standard corticosteroidtreatment for AAV that is often linked with side effects.

These data also supported Tavneos approval inJapan for the treatment of MPA and GPA. A decision on a similar application in Europe is expected by years end.

I am excited that our work has helped lead to the first-in-a-decade approval of a medicine for ANCA-associated vasculitis. This is an important step forward in the treatment of this disease, said Peter A. Merkel, MD, one of the trials investigators, who serves as the director of the internationalVasculitis Clinical Research Consortium, and as a consultant toChemoCentryx.

Patients will now have access to a new class of medication that provides beneficial effects for the treatment of ANCA-associated vasculitis, added Merkel, who also is chief of rheumatology at thePerelman School of Medicineat theUniversity of Pennsylvania.

The complement system, a part of the immune system that normally helps to fight infections, may also play a role in autoimmune diseaseslike AAV.

Tavneos is an oral small molecule that inhibits the receptor of the C5a protein, one of the most potent pro-inflammatory proteins of the complement system. By blocking C5a signaling, the therapy is thought to lessen inflammation and blood vessel damage caused by excessive complement activation.

ADVOCATE was an international clinical trial into the safety and efficacy of Tavneosin adults with GPA and MPA. It enrolled 330 patients across 20 countries, who were randomly assigned to Tavneos or a standard regime of the glucocorticoid prednisone for about one year.

All patients also received standard immunosuppressive medications rituximab or cyclophosphamide, followed by azathioprine. Patients in both arms could also receive other glucocorticoids, if needed.

The studymet its primary efficacy goals, demonstrating that the therapy was similar to at inducing clinical remission after six months (72.3% amongavacopan-treated patients, and 70.1% for those on prednisone), and was significantly better at sustaining that remission at least until the one-year mark (65.7% vs. 54.9%).

Additional data showed that Tavneos was better at improving kidney function, especially among patients with advanced kidney disease at the time of treatment initiation.

The treatmentwas generally well-tolerated, and with lesser steroid-associated toxicity, consistent with more steroids being used in the prednisone group.

Common adverse reactions more frequently reported in the Tavneos group included nausea, headache, high blood pressure, diarrhea, vomiting, rash, fatigue, upper abdominal pain, dizziness, increase in blood levels of creatinine (indicating poor kidney function), and prickling sensation.

ChemoCentryx developed a patient support program, called Tavneos Connect, to assist people who are prescribed this medication in the U.S. More information is to become available here.

We look forward to making Tavneos available to clinicians and patients in the next few week, Schall said, thanking the pioneering scientists, clinicians and patients who believed in the promise of Tavneos and who have worked tirelessly to make it a reality.

Read more here:
FDA Approves Tavneos as Add-on Therapy for Severe MPA, GPA - ANCA Vasculitis News

Read the Rest...

The #1 Cause of Dementia, According to Experts | Eat This Not That – Eat This, Not That

§ October 13th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on The #1 Cause of Dementia, According to Experts | Eat This Not That – Eat This, Not That

More than 55 million people worldwide suffer from dementia, "a syndrome usually of a chronic or progressive nature that leads to deterioration in cognitive function (i.e. the ability to process thought) beyond what might be expected from the usual consequences of biological aging," according to the World Health Organization. Signs of dementia include memory loss, becoming lost in familiar places, changes in learning or thinking and becoming confused while at home. There are a number of contributing factors that cause dementia and while there's no cure, there are lifestyle changes that help reduce the risk. Read on to learn more about dementia, what the leading cause is and how to help prevent itand to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had COVID.

Alzheimer's is a progressive disease of the brain that causes memory loss and can and a decline in social, thinking and behavioral skills. According to Dr. Wally Wazni, Neurologist and Medical Director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center with Dignity Health St. Mary in Long Beach, it's the leading cause of dementia. He explains, "The most common cause of cognitive decline in adults age 35 and older is Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's is usually a disease of the elderly and the chances of getting it increases tremendously with age over 65 years. For people between 65 and 70 the risk is 2 in every 100 people have dementia. As we age, our risk roughly doubles every five years. This means that someone over 90 years old has a 33 % chance of having dementia." He adds, "We have been making strides at treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Most notably is Aducanumab is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of mild Alzheimer's. Aduhelm is an amyloid beta-directed antibody indicated to treat Alzheimer's disease. Aducanumab reduces amyloid beta plaques, the accumulation of which is a defining pathophysiological feature of Alzheimer's disease. While Aduhelm appears highly effective in reducing brain amyloid levels, it is uncertain that patients will actually benefit clinically from treatment. In addition, aducanumab has known risks that require close monitoring with clinical and imaging assessments." Keep reading to see if you're at risk.

RELATED: This Common Habit Can Lead to Heart Disease

While there are some changes we can make to reduce the risk of dementia, there are some things we can't. Dr. Parham Yashar, MD FACS FAANS Board Certified Neurosurgeon at Dignity Health Northridge Hospital says, "When trying to minimize risk factors for dementia, it is important to separate modifiable risk factors from those that you cannot change. For example, age, family history or other genetic disorders such as Down's syndrome are not modifiable. On the other hand, diet and exercise, monitoring your healthaddressing high blood pressure, diabetes, quitting smoking, obtaining adequate sleep, avoiding head trauma, maintaining an appropriate intake of daily vitaminsare factors that you can control to mitigate risk of dementia." He adds, "There are no 'cures' for dementia, however there are many ways to try to prevent or at least minimize the risk of developing dementia, in addition to the modifiable risk factors discussed above. The simplest thing you can do is: Stay Active! Maintain physical activity and exercise; keep your mind active by reading, learning new tasks, performing puzzles, and other brain teasers; keep a healthy diet and make sure to obtain enough rest and consistent and uninterrupted sleep; and treat any underlying medical conditions you may have with the help of your primary care doctor."

RELATED: Everyday Habits That Wreck Your Health

With a few key lifestyle changes, we can reduce the risk of dementia according to Dr. Michael Hirt, Board Certified Nutrition from Harvard University and Board Certified in Internal Medicine and is with The Center for Integrative Medicine in Tarzana California. He also states that s Alzheimer's is the number cause of dementia, "which is linked to a gene (ApoE4) which in turn can be activated by excessive dietary sugar, fat, and alcohol. A simple blood test can determine if you have this genetic variant, and if you do, changing your diet today can change your destiny tomorrow." He recommends the following:

RELATED: The #1 Thing You Can Do for Immunity

Regular use of your brain and body can both be very helpful to keeping your mind sharp as you age. Exercising your brain with puzzles, math games, memory games and vocabulary games are fun and effective ways to encourage your nerves to connect better and improve thinking and memory. Regular exercise has also been shown to improve brain function as well. In fact, nothing elseno pills or potionshas ever been shown to be as good for you as regular exercise. This goes beyond just being 'active' walking around in your daily life or home. Exercise means dedicating a specific amount of time (at least 30 minutes) to a particular activity. This can include dancing, walking, chair exercises, or more aggressive forms of exercise. Want to add ten years to your lifespan? Daily exercise for 1 hour, 7 days a week, is the only thing ever shown to extend life, even more than intermittent fasting.

RELATED: Over 60? Stop Doing These Things

The brain is mostly made of DHA fat, the same omega-3 fat that is found in fish and fish oil supplements. Eating a diet rich in omega-3s or taking a fish oil (or vegan version) will help give your brain what it needs for maintenance and repairs. The arteries that feed the brain are also susceptible to plaque and related vascular diseases, just like the heart. So a heart-healthy low fat Mediterranean type diet will also keep the smaller but critical arteries in your brain wide open and capable of delivering the oxygen and nutrients your brain needs to remember where you left your keysevery time. Lastly, here's what you probably already know, that sugar, alcohol, pesticides and chemical additives are some of the common poisons that age our brains. This country was built on the motto that if a little is good, then more has to be better. Unfortunately, this axiom does not apply to these substances that become more toxic the more you ingest. So, eat freshly prepared, organic food as much as possible and seek out restaurants and venues that serve the same. As for sugar and alcohol, keep these toxins in check if you can, and if you cannot, then stop them completely if even a little triggers unhealthy binges.

RELATED: Everyday Habits That May Lead to Heart Attack

Finally, nothing (and I mean nothing) will make you 'sicker quicker' than stress. Humans are built for a bucolic lifestyle in the hills tending our herds and gardens. When threatened, we have the physiological muster to surge our energy and strength to fight or flee. But, too many of us live in this heightened state of stress for days, weeks, months and years on end. This kind of stress will make you sick in ways that no other poison can. So, find your happy place; go there frequently. Meditate, pray, unplug, sing, dance, and laugh as often as you can. These are the strongest 'drugs' I can prescribeand they cost nothing but your attention to them."

RELATED: CDC Director Warns of COVID "Crisis"

Dr. William Nields, medical director of Cognitive Health Centers in Sarasota, Florida told US News, "The symptoms are very subtle in the beginning and almost unnoticeable. For that reason, most people are not diagnosed with Alzheimer's or one of the other many brain diseases that causes dementia until they've already progressed into their mid-stage." He also stated, "In the case of Alzheimer's Disease, beta amyloid plaques (tangles of proteins that interfere with normal brain functioning) may be building up in the brain 20 years before dementia, and years before symptoms are even present," Nields says. Dementia is typically diagnosed after "significant cognitive decline has occurred and a person has difficulty caring for themselves."

RELATED: I'm a COVID Doctor and Wish Everyone Knew This

Since the symptoms of dementia can be mild in the beginning, it can be challenging to know when to see a doctor, but Dr. Parham Yashar, MD FACS FAANS Board Certified Neurosurgeon at Dignity Health Northridge Hospital says, "if a patient or their family member notices a cognitive change, it is always a good idea to have an evaluation by a physician to discuss the symptoms. Best to start with your primary care physician or a neurologist for further and more detailed evaluation. Presently only a few treatments are available for Alzheimer's dementia. Recently the FDA approved a new drug called aducanamab which is an infusion therapy that targets the beta amyloid microscopic protein in the brain. This drug was shown in clinical trials to delay the clinical decline of people living with early Alzheimer's disease. Other options include cholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil, and glutamate regulators such as memantine." And to protect your life and the lives of others, don't visit any of these 35 Places You're Most Likely to Catch COVID.

Follow this link:
The #1 Cause of Dementia, According to Experts | Eat This Not That - Eat This, Not That

Read the Rest...

New book busts myths about viruses, to release on October 30 – Outlook India

§ October 13th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on New book busts myths about viruses, to release on October 30 – Outlook India

New Delhi, Oct 12 (PTI) A mere mention of the word ''virus'' can bring the most comforted soul to the edge. But there''s more to viruses than meets the eye, and unravelling the mysterious ways in which viruses serve specific ecological functions and offer immeasurable benefits in nature is author Pranay Lal''s upcoming book, "Invisible Empires: The Natural History of Viruses".

The book, published by Penguin Random House India (PRHI), will hit the stands on October 30. It is a myth-busting, factual and never-before-told story addressing the origin, evolution and everything in between of viruses.

"Viruses are amazing and ubiquitous entities that are neither dead nor completely alive, yet they are critical drivers of evolution. They influence every lifeform and regulate every ecosystem, including the ones in our bodies. I will take the reader on an unexpected journey into the lives of these microscopic creatures, without whom life itself would not be possible," said bio-chemist Lal, who has also authored "Indica: A deep natural history of the Indian subcontinent" (2016)

According to the publishers, readers will be "astonished by the story of viruses, starting from deep time to how they shaped the natural world and human history and culture, and what the future of their co-existence with us will look like".

"From Pranay Lal''s brilliant book, I learnt to look at viruses in a whole new light. He offers a fascinating and nuanced take on their role in our ecology and society. We could not be more delighted to publish this unique and marvellously inquisitive book about a subject that has haunted and obsessed us for nearly a year, by a writer who is perfectly positioned for this task," said Meru Gokhale, publisher, Penguin Press, PRHI.

"Invisible Empires" has garnered rave reviews from eminent personalities in the field of science and medicine, including the likes of Nobel laureate Venki Ramakrishnan and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Siddhartha Mukherjee.

While Mukherjee, author of "The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer", called Lal''s book "fascinating and illuminating", Ramakrishnan said the book is an "engaging and beautifully illustrated account" taking the readers on a grand tour of the world of viruses.

"In this engaging and beautifully illustrated account, Pranay Lal takes us on a grand tour of the world of viruses, revealing their history and the amazing and varied roles they play in nature. Anyone interested in the natural world, including young readers will greatly enjoy this book," said Ramakrishnan in his praise for the book. PTI MG TRS

TRS

Read the rest here:
New book busts myths about viruses, to release on October 30 - Outlook India

Read the Rest...

A closer look at the physiologists who won 2021’s Nobel Prize in Medicine – Big Think

§ October 13th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on A closer look at the physiologists who won 2021’s Nobel Prize in Medicine – Big Think

On Monday October 4, 2021, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm announced the winners for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. The prize was awarded jointly to David Julius, a physiologist, and Ardem Patapoutian, a molecular biologist and neuroscientist. The men were honored for their research into human sensory perception; each had, independently of the other, discovered mechanisms through which human bodies respond to touch and temperature.

The importance of the five senses cannot be understated. They are mediums through which we experience and understand the world around us, transforming external stimuli into electrical signals that our brain translate into the sensations of sight, sound, smell, touch and taste. How exactly this transformation works out on a molecular level, however, was long unclear and still remains one of the most elusive questions in modern science.

As such, the Academy rarely fails to spotlight researchers who contribute to solving this enduring mystery. Georg von Bksy, who won the Nobel Prize in 1961, figured out how our eardrums convert pressure waves into vibrations. Just six years later, the same award was given to Ragnar Granit, Halden Keffer Hartline and George Wald for their discoveries concerning the physiological and chemical visual processes in the eye.

The research of Dr. Julius and Dr. Patapoutian both builds on and goes beyond the work of their predecessors. Compared to other senses the mechanics of which are tied to specific organs pain and pressure receptors are embedded in the nervous system and can be found throughout our entire body, making them incredibly difficult to study. Its been the last main sensory system to fall to molecular analysis, Dr. Julius, trying to rationalize his receiving the prize, told the press on Monday.

Dr. Julius was born in 1955 in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn to parents of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. He decided to become a researcher at a young age, earning a bachelors degree from MIT followed by a doctorate from the University of California, Berkely. He finished his education with a post-doctoral training program at Columbia University, where studies concerning serotonin and LSD fostered an interest in how the human body processes and responds to the outside world.

Dr. Julius, who currently serves as the chair of the Department of Physiology at the University of California in San Francisco, made his award-winning discovery as early as 1997. During that year, his team of researchers compiled a library of neural pathways that are activated by capsaicin, a compound that gives spicy foods like peppers their burning sensation when consumed. Along the way, Dr. Julius discovered TRPV1, the ion channel that acts as our primary capsaicin receptor.

In order to truly appreciate Dr. Julius discovery, a bit of context may be in order. Unless you build up tolerance, eating spicy foods is painful. Peppers and wasabi give off a strange sensation that your mouth is on fire, and for the longest time researchers simply couldnt figure out why this was the case. Failing to pinpoint any immediate benefits of this response, they speculated it must be the remnant of some distant evolutionary adaptation.

Dr. Julius answered this question by showing us what TRPV1 is responsible for: keeping our bodies safe from high temperatures. The channel responds not only to capsaicin, but also to temperatures that are greater than 110 degrees Fahrenheit. TRPV1 also acts up when we are injured or sunburned, causing damaged tissue to feel hot to the touch. In all cases, the channel transmits a signal that our brains turn into the sensation of heat.

The human body is an infinitely complex ecosystem. The end goal of molecular analysis is to find out how this ecosystem functions by assessing the purpose of each individual gene and the proteins for which it codes. Given that humans are believed to have between 20,000 and 25,000 of these, its no small task. There are many ways of doing this, and each researcher takes their own approach.

Where Dr. Julius assembled an entire genetic library, Dr. Patapoutian worked through trial and error. Isolating cells in a petri dish and poking them with a microscopic pipette, he and his fellow researchers inactivated one gene after the other. Once the cells stopped responding to this interference, they knew they had found the channel responsible for sensing and reacting to touch.

Dr. Patapoutian who was born in Beirut and currently works at the nonprofit biomedical research facility Scripps Research named these channels Piezo1 and Piezo2, after the Greek word for pressure, which, it turns out, is all touch really is. Having finally identified these previously unknown channels, Dr. Patapoutian paved the way for subsequent studies. In recent years, other researchers have shown that these channels also regulate other physiological processes, like letting us know our bladder is full.

Machanosensation is how cells talk to each other by force, Dr. Patapoutian explained in a press release published on the Scripps website. We didnt know the importance of pressure sensors to the body until we first found them () We talk about a key that unlocks a door that opens to a room. These receptors are the key to the door of understanding biology and disease.

Nobel Prize-winning researchers should be judged not only by the contents of their studies, but also by the potential those studies hold for future research. Like the winners before them, Dr. Julius and Dr. Patapoutian paved the way for numerous studies. Once Dr. Julius had identified one of the channels that causes us to feel pain in the form of burning temperatures, pharmaceutical companies tried to develop a new generation of non-opioid painkilling drugs that worked by blocking these channels.

These efforts were, unfortunately, unsuccessful. TRPV1, it turns out, also plays a key role in regulating our body temperatures during fevers. Blocking these channels could not only prove harmful, but also cause other channels in our nervous system to activate and overcompensate. Additionally, pain, as Dr. Julius found, serves a purpose: making us aware of external threats. Consequently, nullifying pain would rob us of one of our senses, rendering us partially blind to the world around us.

Because these pharmaceutical companies were unable to turn Dr. Julius findings into tangible results, its tempting to conclude that his research is not as important as the Nobel Committee would like us to believe. But while the committee has made some controversial choices in the past, especially in the categories of peace and literature, its picks in science tend to be a bit sounder. Breakthroughs dont take place in a day, after all. Instead, our scientific understanding advances step by step, with todays achievements leaning heavily on the discoveries of yesterdays researchers.

See the rest here:
A closer look at the physiologists who won 2021's Nobel Prize in Medicine - Big Think

Read the Rest...

Injectable Microscopic Robots Market Insights, Analysis and Forecast with Leading Key Players Bionaut Labs, Merck KGaA, Ginkgo Bioworks Amite Tangy…

§ October 5th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Injectable Microscopic Robots Market Insights, Analysis and Forecast with Leading Key Players Bionaut Labs, Merck KGaA, Ginkgo Bioworks Amite Tangy…

A New Report by Absolute Markets Insights offers extensive Global Injectable Microscopic Robots Market assessments considering the importance, projections and offers comprehensive, strategic life choice data identification and effectively provide a high degree of industrial clarity. The study offers key drivers that drive the growth in the Injectable Microscopic Robots Market. Insights in this report help market players in planning strategies to gain market presence. The research also outlines restraints of the market along with opportunities mentioned to assist market players in taking further steps by determining potential in untapped regions.

In terms of revenue, global injectable microscopic robots market is expected to grow at a CAGR of +19.89% over the forecast period. The study analyses the market in terms of revenue across all the major regions, which have been bifurcated into countries.

Some of the Key Players Operating in the Global Injectable Microscopic Robots Market include: Bionaut Labs, Merck KGaA, Ginkgo Bioworks, amongst others.

Get a PDF Sample Copy of this Report at: https://www.absolutemarketsinsights.com/request_sample.php?id=913

The Injectable Microscopic Robots Market study follows a combination of in-depth research and structured methodology. These methods probe the market through various angles for finding apt analytics. However, on a general scale, the data is garnered from a variety of reliable sources such as sellers list, product and research papers, manufacturers processes and many more. Each market study is given the same exact attentive overshadow that makes them a valuable read.

The Injectable Microscopic Robots market report has classified the market into segments including product type, and application. Every segment is evaluated based on share and growth rate. Besides, the analysts have studied the potential regions that may prove rewarding for the manufacturers in the coming years. The regional analysis includes reliable predictions on value and volume, thereby helping market players to gain deep insights into the overall industry. Furthermore, the Injectable Microscopic Robots market study revolves around developing regional trends, preferred marketing channels, long-term stability and environmental analysis. It also contains product capacities, price, profit statements, demand, production and market growth and a trajectory of the upcoming forecast.

The medicine and healthcare sector has seen significant advancements in the last 25 years. Individuals have immensely benefited from technologies such as MRI, CT and X-ray, amongst others. Both in diagnostics and treatments, the medicine industry has seen a considerable investment from both private and public entities. The field of robotics is slowly being adopted in medicine, especially for applications such as surgery and imaging, amongst others. Medical nano robots have already been deployed for imaging and drug delivery purposes. However, researchers and medical professionals are closely monitoring the progress of a major solution which has the ability to provide targeted delivery for drugs, tumour removal and acute imaging in areas which cant be accessed by the current technology. This solution is referred to as injectable microscopic robotics. Microscopic robots can be injected into the human body, regardless of the age of the person, and can be manoeuvred to reach the specific destination for various applications. The growing demand for accurate drug delivery and tumour removal, coupled with compact medical imaging, is expected to propel the growth of the injectable microscopic robots market in the coming years.

If You Have Any Query/Inquiry, Ask Our Expert: https://www.absolutemarketsinsights.com/enquiry_before_buying.php?id=913

Tumours are an abnormal set of tissues which is formed when the cells grow and divide abruptly. They can be cancerous or non-cancerous in nature. However, tumour removal forms a critical part of medicine, as it can affect the patients daily functions. Microscopic robots can be injected into the tumour location, and drugs can be delivered to shrink the tumour. Furthermore, blood supply to that part of the body can be cut-off with the help of micro robots, thereby killing the tumour in the long run. Tumour removal application of injectable microscopic robots are expected to see a greater adoption in the coming years, especially in advanced countries like the U.S., Germany and Canada, amongst others.

Impact of COVID-19:

This study presents insights on COVID-19 in consumer behavior and shifts in demand, purchasing patterns, supply chain reorganization, market forces dynamics and substantial government involvement. The new research provides insights, analysis, estimates and forecasts in view of COVID-19s effect on the markets.

Reasons to Buy the Report:

Request for Customization: https://www.absolutemarketsinsights.com/request_for_customization.php?id=913

Global Injectable Microscopic Robots Market

By Type

By Application

By Region

For More Information Click: https://www.absolutemarketsinsights.com/reports/Global-Edge-Analytics-Market2019-2027-913

Contact Us:

Company: Absolute Markets Insights

Email Id: sales@absolutemarketsinsights.com

Phone: +91-740-024-2424

Contact Name: Shreyas Tanna

Website: https://www.absolutemarketsinsights.com

Read the original:
Injectable Microscopic Robots Market Insights, Analysis and Forecast with Leading Key Players Bionaut Labs, Merck KGaA, Ginkgo Bioworks Amite Tangy...

Read the Rest...

Nobel prize in medicine won by US scientists who unlocked the secrets of our sense of touch – Livescience.com

§ October 5th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nobel prize in medicine won by US scientists who unlocked the secrets of our sense of touch – Livescience.com

The 2021 Nobel prize in physiology or medicine has been awarded to two U.S. scientists who discovered the microscopic secrets behind the human sense of touch.

David Julius, of the University of California San Francisco, received half of the prize for using "capsaicin, a pungent compound from chili peppers that induces a burning sensation, to identify a sensor in the nerve endings of the skin that responds to heat," while Ardem Patapoutian, of the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, received the other half for using "pressure-sensitive cells to discover a novel class of sensors that respond to mechanical stimuli in the skin and internal organs," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced Monday (Oct. 4).

Their discoveries "have allowed us to understand how heat, cold and mechanical force can initiate the nerve impulses that allow us to perceive and adapt to the world around us," the Nobel Committee said in a statement. "This knowledge is being used to develop treatments for a wide range of disease conditions, including chronic pain."

Related: 7 revolutionary Nobel Prizes in medicine

The award comes with a prize of 10 million Swedish kronor ($1.15 million) to be shared equally between the two winners.

Beginning in the 1990s, the scientists pieced together the molecular pathways that translate heat and pressure detected on the skin into nerve impulses perceived by the brain. Julius and his colleagues started the work by creating a library of millions of DNA segments containing genes found in sensory nerve cells. By adding the genes one by one to cells that did not normally react to capsaicin, they eventually found that a single gene was responsible for the burning sensation associated with capsaicin. The gene they had discovered gave cells the ability to build a protein called TRPV1, which was activated at temperatures hot enough to be considered painful.

Both Julius and Patapoutian independently went on to use menthol to discover another protein, TPRM8, which was activated by cold temperatures, as well as a number of other proteins that detected a range of different temperatures.

Building on this work, Patapoutian and his colleagues created a library of 72 genes that they suspected encoded blueprints to make receptors for mechanical pressure. By painstakingly deactivating these genes one by one in cells, they discovered that one of the genes produced a protein that spurred cells to produce a tiny electrical signal each time they were prodded. The receptor they had discovered was not only vital for sensing mechanical force, but was also used in various ways to maintain blood vessels, alongside having a proposed role in adjusting the bodys blood pressure.

Soon after that, they found a second protein receptor that was vital in sensing body position and motion, a sense known as proprioception. They named the two receptors Piezo1 and Piezo2, after the Greek word for pressure.

Not only did the discoveries help explain the mechanisms behind sensory experiences like temperature and pressure, but they also opened up a world of possibilities for new drugs targeting the receptors from painkillers to drugs that could alleviate blood pressure across blood vessels and organs.

"While we understood the physiology of the senses, what we didn't understand was how we sensed differences in temperature or pressure," Oscar Marin, director of the MRC Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at Kings College London told The Associated Press. "Knowing how our body senses these changes is fundamental because once we know those molecules, they can be targeted. It's like finding a lock and now we know the precise keys that will be necessary to unlock it."

Joseph Erlanger and Herbert Gasser, who shared the Nobel prize in physiology or medicine in 1944, first discovered specialized nerve cells responsive to both painful and non-painful touch.

Last year's prize went to three scientists for their discovery of hepatitis C, a blood-borne virus that causes chronic liver inflammation. The deadly disease's discovery was a breakthrough that enabled doctors to identify the virus in patients' blood and develop a cure, Live Science previously reported.

Originally published on Live Science.

Originally posted here:
Nobel prize in medicine won by US scientists who unlocked the secrets of our sense of touch - Livescience.com

Read the Rest...

Can AI help predict the next pandemic? – Medical News Today

§ October 5th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Can AI help predict the next pandemic? – Medical News Today

Written by Lori Uildriks on September 29, 2021 Fact checked by Alexandra Sanfins, Ph.D.

Zoonotic diseases, or zoonoses, occur due to viruses, bacteria, parasites, or fungi that spread between animals and people.

Approximately 60% of known and 75% of new or emerging infectious diseases can spread from animals to humans.

Dr. Barbara A. Han, Ph.D., a disease ecologist for the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, explained in a podcast, a zoonotic disease is just an infection that originates in an animal [], caused by a parasite or pathogen thats perfectly happy to live in this wild species.

Dr. Han elaborated: Occasionally, that pathogen or parasite will spill over into a human, and 99% of the time, thats where it ends that person might get sick, but its a dead-end host, so it doesnt go any further. Some of them can transmit from person to another person, so that secondary transmission is really critical for something that has the potential to become pandemic.

Human expansion into new geographic areas with close contact with wild and domestic animals plus changes in climate have increased the occurrence of zoonoses. Similarly, the increased movement of animals, people, and animal products due to international trade and travel has also played a significant part.

Therefore, improved global communication, coordination, and collaboration between human, animal, and environmental experts to prevent, detect, investigate, prioritize, and respond to zoonotic diseases is imperative.

This strengthened communication is vital to allow us to create an early warning system to prevent or mitigate the next pandemic.

This need led researchers from the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom to formulate a new approach. They used viral and human genome sequence features to develop machine learning models a type of artificial intelligence to predict the probability that an animal virus might jump into humans.

Their latest study appears in the journal PLOS BIOLOGY.

Approximately 1.67 million undescribed animal viruses cause infections in mammals and birds, and scientists believe that up to half could spill over into humans.

Dr. Nardus Molentze, a co-author of the study and research associate at the University of Glasgows Centre for Virus Research, spoke with Medical News Today:

In recent years, the field of virus discovery has made significant advances, to the point where viruses previously unknown to science are being reported regularly. But this leads to a challenge we still have a huge task ahead of us in terms of characterizing viral diversity in nature, and beyond discovery, to work out whether these viruses pose a threat.

He added, In 2018, my co-authors showed that RNA virus genomes contain enough signal for machine learning methods to identify the broad reservoir group for instance bats, rodents, and primates in which they circulate naturally.

In other words, they showed that by analyzing a viral genome alone, their model could identify what type of animal with which the virus could cause infection.

Dr. Molentze continued, This made us wonder whether [] virus genomes might also contain clues about their ability to [cause infections in] humans specifically when given the opportunity.

The researchers collected a genome sequence from 861 RNA and DNA virus species from 36 viral families that can infect animals.

To investigate, they classified each virus according to its ability to cause infection in humans using information from three published datasets.

They also noted each virus similarity to viruses that can cause infections in humans and built machine learning models to predict whether these infections could occur.

The scientists tested several learning-based models to identify the best-performing model and used this to rank 758 virus species.

The machine-learning model correctly identified 70.8% of human viruses with high or very high zoonotic potential.

In a study of 645 animal viruses that were not part of the training data, the models predicted increased zoonotic transmission risk of genetically similar, or phylogenetic nonhuman primate viruses, but not in other animal groups.

A second experiment predicted the zoonotic potential of all currently recognized coronavirus species and the human and animal genomes of all severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus.

Dr. Molentze commented on the findings, Our work shows a path through which virus discoveries can be turned into actionable information: the ability to identify which newly discovered viruses are most likely to be able to [cause infection in] humans with reasonable accuracy allows us to focus further characterization efforts on those viruses.

Since the computer learning method requires only a genome sequence, it may provide a low cost approach for evidence-based virus surveillance.

Dr. Molentze added, Our model is far from perfect predictions will contain both false positives and false negatives, which can only be distinguished through further characterization of these viruses in the lab.

Dr. Molentze emphasized the need for further study, If we want to turn virus discoveries into actual pandemic preparedness, we need to characterize newly discovered viruses. [] Models [] could help prioritize viruses at various stages in this characterization pipeline, making their implementation more efficient and feasible, particularly if we are also able to develop methods predicting other aspects of risk, such as virulence and ability to transmit.

View original post here:
Can AI help predict the next pandemic? - Medical News Today

Read the Rest...

Coherus Announces Positive Results of UDENYCA On-Body Injector Clinical Trial – BioSpace

§ October 5th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Coherus Announces Positive Results of UDENYCA On-Body Injector Clinical Trial – BioSpace

- UDENYCA On-Body Injector (OBI) Achieved Both Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Bioequivalence in Randomized Clinical Trial

-Coherus plans to seek U.S. marketing authorization for theUDENYCAOBI in 2022

REDWOOD CITY, Calif., Oct. 05, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Coherus BioSciences, Inc. (the Company; Nasdaq: CHRS) today announced positive results from a randomized, open-label, crossover study assessing the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) bioequivalence of UDENYCA (pegfilgrastim-cbqv) administered via a proprietary on-body injector (OBI) device compared to the currently marketed UDENYCA pre-filled syringe (PFS). The study met all PK bioequivalence primary endpoints as well as the key secondary pharmacodynamic endpoint of ANC (absolute neutrophil count). No new safety signals were observed. The study enrolled 189 subjects randomized 1:1 to receive one of two treatment sequences of UDENYCA: OBI followed by PFS, or the reverse, with a treatment interval of 6 to 8 weeks.

Coherus plans a 2022 submission to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of a prior approval supplement to seek marketing authorization for the UDENYCA OBI and anticipates a standard 10-month review period. Coherus expects commercial launch of the UDENYCA OBI directly post approval.

UDENYCA quickly became the top-selling pre-filled syringe pegfilgrastim in the U.S. within months of launch in 2019, establishing Coherus as a trusted partner to oncologists and demonstrating the power of biosimilar competition to expand patient access to an important cancer medicine, said Denny Lanfear, CEO of Coherus. With our OBI program progress, we are excited by the potential to offer to providers and patients a new on-body injector presentation of UDENYCA, if approved, and to compete directly with Neulasta Onpro, which retains more than 50% share of the overall pegfilgrastim market.

An FDA-approved UDENYCA OBI would offer providers a highly desired alternative to the originators on-body pegfilgrastim delivery system and eliminate the need for patients to return to a hospital or other clinical setting the day after chemotherapy to receive UDENYCA.

About UDENYCA UDENYCA is the #1 prescribed pegfilgrastim pre-filled syringe in the United States. UDENYCAis a leukocyte growth factor indicated to decrease the incidence of infection, as manifested by febrile neutropenia, in patients with non-myeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive anti-cancer drugs associated with a clinically significant incidence of febrile neutropenia.

Limitations of Use: UDENYCAis not indicated for the mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Contraindications: Patients with a history of serious allergic reactions to pegfilgrastim products or filgrastim products. Reactions have included anaphylaxis.

Warnings and Precautions: Fatal splenic rupture:Evaluate patients who report left upper abdominal or shoulder pain for an enlarged spleen or splenic rupture. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): Evaluate patients who develop fever, lung infiltrates, or respiratory distress. Discontinue UDENYCAin patients with ARDS. Serious allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis: The majority of reported events occurred upon initial exposure. Allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, can recur within days after the discontinuation of initial anti-allergic treatment. Permanently discontinue UDENYCAin patients with serious allergic reactions. Sickle cell crises:Severe and sometimes fatal crises have occurred. Discontinue UDENYCAif sickle cell crisis occurs. Glomerulonephritis:The diagnoses were based upon azotemia, hematuria (microscopic and macroscopic), proteinuria, and renal biopsy. Generally, events resolved after dose reduction or discontinuation. Evaluate and consider dose-reduction or interruption of UDENYCAif causality is likely. Leukocytosis:White blood cell (WBC) counts of 100 x 109/L or greater have been observed in patients receiving pegfilgrastim products. Monitoring of complete blood count (CBC) during UDENYCAtherapy is recommended. Thrombocytopenia:Thrombocytopenia has been reported in patients receiving pegfilgrastim. Monitor platelet counts. Capillary Leak Syndrome:Has been reported after G-CSF administration, including pegfilgrastim products, and is characterized by hypotension, hypoalbuminemia, edema, and hemoconcentration. Episodes vary in frequency, severity and may be life-threatening if treatment is delayed. If symptoms develop, closely monitor and give standard symptomatic treatment, which may include a need for intensive care. Potential for Tumor Growth Stimulatory Effects on Malignant Cells:The possibility that pegfilgrastim products act as a growth factor for any tumor type, including myeloid malignancies and myelodysplasia, diseases for which pegfilgrastim products are not approved, cannot be excluded. Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) and Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) in Patients with Breast and Lung Cancer:MDS and AML have been associated with the use of pegfilgrastim in conjunction with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in patients with breast and lung cancer. Monitor patients for sign and symptoms of MDS/AML in these settings. Aortitis:Has been reported in patients receiving pegfilgrastim products, occurring as early as the first week after start of therapy. Manifestations may include generalized signs and symptoms such as fever, abdominal pain, malaise, back pain, and increased inflammatory markers (e.g., c-reactive protein and white blood cell count). Consider aortitis when signs and symptoms develop without known etiology. Discontinue UDENYCA if aortitis is suspected. Nuclear Imaging:Increased hematopoietic activity of the bone marrow in response to growth factor therapy has been associated with transient positive bone imaging changes. Consider when interpreting bone imaging results.

Adverse Reactions:Most common adverse reactions ( 5% difference in incidence compared to placebo) are bone pain and pain in extremity.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contactCoherus BioSciencesat 1-800-4-UDENYCA (1-800-483-3692)orFDAat 1-800-FDA-1088 orwww.fda.gov/medwatch. Full Prescribing Information available atwww.UDENYCA.com

About Coherus BioSciences Coherus is a commercial stage biopharmaceutical company with the mission to increase access to cost-effective medicines that can have a major impact on patients lives and to deliver significant savings to the health care system. Coherus strategy is to build a leading immuno-oncology franchise funded with cash generated by its commercial biosimilar business. For additional information, please visitwww.coherus.com.

Coherus markets UDENYCA (pegfilgrastim-cbqv) in the United States and through 2023 expects to launch toripalimab, an anti-PD-1 antibody, as well as biosimilars of Lucentis, Humira, and Avastin, if approved.

UDENYCA is a trademark of Coherus BioSciences, Inc.

Avastin and Lucentis are registered trademarks of Genentech, Inc.

Humira is a registered trademark of AbbVie Inc.

Forward-Looking Statements Except for the historical information contained herein, the matters set forth in this press release are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the "safe harbor" provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, but not limited to, Coherus plans to submit a prior approval supplement for the UDENYCA on-body injector in 2022; Coherus expected timeline for the FDAs review period; Coherus ability to gain approval for the UDENYCA on-body injector presentation; Coherus plans to launch the UDENYCA on-body injector upon approval; Coherus ability to compete successfully against another pegfilgrastim on-body injector device; Coherus ability to generate cash flow from its UDENYCA business; the potential for Coherus to gain approval for other biosimilar products or for toripalimab in the United States; Coherus plans to invest the cash generated by its biosimilar commercial business to build a focused immuno-oncology franchise; Coherus ability to prepare for projected launches through 2023 of toripalimab and of biosimilars of Humira, Avastin and Lucentis, if approved.

Such forward-looking statements involve substantial risks and uncertainties that could cause Coherus actual results, performance or achievements to differ significantly from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include, among others, the risks and uncertainties inherent in the clinical drug development process; the risks and uncertainties of the regulatory approval process, including the timing of Coherus regulatory filings; the risk that Coherus is unable to complete commercial transactions and other matters that could affect the availability or commercial potential of Coherus drug candidates; and the risks and uncertainties of possible patent litigation. All forward-looking statements contained in this press release speak only as of the date on which they were made. Coherus undertakes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements. For a further description of the risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ from those expressed in these forward-looking statements, as well as risks relating to Coherus business in general, see Coherus Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 25, 2021, its Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on August 5, 2021 and its future periodic reports to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Results for the quarter ended June 30, 2021, are not necessarily indicative of our operating results for any future periods.

Coherus Contact Information: IR Contact: McDavid Stilwell Coherus BioSciences, Inc. IR@coherus.com

Media Contact: Sheryl Seapy Real Chemistry sseapy@realchemistry.com +1 (949) 903-4750

See the rest here:
Coherus Announces Positive Results of UDENYCA On-Body Injector Clinical Trial - BioSpace

Read the Rest...

A microscopic worm may shed light on how we perceive gravity | Penn Today – Penn Today

§ October 5th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on A microscopic worm may shed light on how we perceive gravity | Penn Today – Penn Today

While humans rely on gravity for balance and orientation, the mechanisms by which we actually sense this fundamental force are largely unknown. Odder still, the model organism C. elegans, a microscopic worm, can also sense the direction of gravity, even though there is no known ecological reason for it to do so.

To untangle this mystery and get at the fundamentals of our own sense of gravity, a team of Penn Engineering researchers led by Haim Bau, professor in mechanical engineering and applied mechanics, and David Raizen, associate professor in neurology at the Perelman School of Medicine, conducted a series of experiments on this model organism. The lead author, Alex Chen, a then-visiting doctoral student, and co-authors, Hungtang Ko, a then-masters student, and Oswald Chuang, a former postdoctoral fellow, contributed to this work while working in both Baus and Raizens labs.

Even with its extremely simple physiology, C. elegans shares more than half of its genes with humans, allowing genetic studies to give insight into which genes are responsible for similar traits in humans.

We were working in previous research on hydrodynamics of C. elegans, dropping them into water, when we observed that these worms all tended to swim towards the bottom of the cuvette, says Bau. We wondered if they were responding to gravity or just top-heavy and passively sinking.

Recognizing this as an opportunity to pinpoint molecular pathways responsible for gravitaxis, or the ability to move in response to gravitational forces, the team initiated the study, which is published in the journal BMC Biology.

We know dopamine is a very common neurotransmitter that controls many functions in the body. When we turned it off in mutants, the ability to detect gravity was lost, says Bau.

Interestingly, when worms were exposed to dopamine supplements at the larval development stage and later, in the solution, some of that ability came back, indicating that pharmaceutical recovery may be possible, he says.

This connection between dopamine and gravity sensing provides insight into applications for human health.

This story is by Melissa Pappas. Read more at Penn Engineering Today.

The rest is here:
A microscopic worm may shed light on how we perceive gravity | Penn Today - Penn Today

Read the Rest...

3 Cutting-Edge Advances in the World of Modern Robotics that You Have to Know – Hurricane Valley Times

§ October 5th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on 3 Cutting-Edge Advances in the World of Modern Robotics that You Have to Know – Hurricane Valley Times

If youve ever watched any Sci-Fi movie where robots or advanced machine civilizations are ruling the universe, you might have a slight apprehension toward robotics.

This is largely because we humans naturally fear the possibility of our own creations one day destroying us, and this is why robots are often at the antagonistic end in many books and films. But the good news is that were not hiding among the rubble of civilization, scurrying like rats around a robot-ruled planet. At least, not yet.

Robots in 2021 are doing far more good than they are waging mindless carnage. In fact, without modern robotics, much of our advances in medicine and science would not be possible.

Today, there are numerous advances in the world of modern robotics that are noteworthy, but a few stand out among the crowd. Here, well explore 3 of the coolest cutting-edge technologies in the robotics space.

Nanobots have been the stuff of science fiction for many decades. But the fact is that this technology, known as nanotechnology, is much more advanced now than in years past.

Imagine a large swarm of bees, shifting and swirling around in the sky in unison, each aimed at a specific task. Now imagine that this entire swarm can fit inside a teaspoon. This is nanotechnology at work.

Though applications for nanobots are still in developing stages, scientists are hoping that one day nanobots can be injected into the bloodstream and actually be able to function as white blood cells with the ability to target and destroy specific infections and diseases such as cancer and many others.

Creating a microscopic robot takes a great deal of skill and technology. So just imagine having to create millions of these tiny automatons.

Much of the surgical procedures performed today would be impossible without the use of robotics applications. In fact, these machines have made surgeries safer and less invasive than in years before.

For example, the company, Intuitive Surgical, which produces the da Vinci platform, is one of the largest and most pioneering companies on the cutting-edge of modern robotics. Its surgical robot applications allow surgeons access to tools that they can fully manipulate and perform precision movements in the most delicate areas of the human body.

Robotics of this kind requires a complex production process, from the use of heat staking machines for industry professionals to months of testing in research and development.

Surgical robotics allow us to study the human body in a much more intimate way without having to rely on dated and invasive procedures.

In 2016, Sophia was activated. This humanoid robot with advanced AI technology is a learning machine, and it was also the first robot to be granted citizenship in Saudi Arabia.

Further, Sophia also addressed a conference in India in 2019, and her makers claim that she can remember faces and names, have contextual conversations, and can mimic almost all human expressions.

Designed to look like Audrey Hepburn, Sophia is just the beginning in the world of humanoid AI robotics.

We often equate AI robotics with movies like The Matrix or The Terminator, but so far we have nothing to fear from these robots, which largely still require the need for humans to control and operate these complex systems.

These robots are being designed to serve a greater purpose. Futuristic applications involve the hope that these robots will one day be able to explore foreign worlds and be sent to places on the planet where humans could not survive.

The world of robotics is advancing as fast as the imagination can envision. And what was once a story that fit well into the world of science-fiction, is quickly becoming a reality that we can all see and touch.

In the coming decades, the use and development of robotics are only expected to increase, and the advancement of our human civilization is sure to follow.

Continued here:
3 Cutting-Edge Advances in the World of Modern Robotics that You Have to Know - Hurricane Valley Times

Read the Rest...

Scientists Rewired The Brain of a Mutant Worm Using Parts From a Hydra – ScienceAlert

§ October 5th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Scientists Rewired The Brain of a Mutant Worm Using Parts From a Hydra – ScienceAlert

Brains aren't the easiest of organs to study, what with their delicate wiring and subtle whispering of neurotransmitter messages. Now, this research could be made a little easier, as we've learned we can swap some critical chemical systems with the host animal being none the wiser.

In a proof-of-concept study run by a team of US researchers, the microscopic worm Caenorhabditis elegans was genetically gifted pieces of a nervous system taken from a radically different creature a curious freshwater organism known as Hydra.

The swap wasn't unlike teaching a specific brain circuit a foreign language, and finding it performs its job just as well as before.

"There's a lot of diversity of synaptic connection in any animal's brain," explains Josh Hawk, a neuroscientist with the Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts.

"Being able to pick and choose what to put in another organism will help us untangle and understand how and why brains do what they do."

Similar to us, the nematode C. elegans has a tightly-linked nervous system governed by chemical messengers called neurotransmitters. Different circuits make use of their own kinds of neurotransmitter, which are released into the thin gaps between neurons called synapses.

For the most part, these narrow voids are where a brain does much of its work. Synapses are the logic gates of the brain's computer circuitry blocking some signals, enhancing others, transforming chemical fluctuations into something profound.

Neuroscientists can understand a great deal about the functions of a nervous system by tinkering with this traffic-light system using a variety of drugs, genetic tweaks, and light-operated switches.

Turning things on and off and watching the chaos can tell you a lot about how a nervous system operates. After all, much of what we've learned in neuroscience has emerged from observing the consequences of a broken brain.

"But to really understand how they work, you want to know if you can rebuild them fix them after they are broken. And that is very hard to do," says the study's senior author, Daniel Coln-Ramos from Yale University School of Medicine.

The trick in this case was to 'fix' a broken circuit in nematodes with parts borrowed from another organism, one that runs on very different biochemical software.Hydra aren't worms. They're more closely related to sea anemone, with tiny, tentacled bodies governed by a loosely-connected spread of neurons arranged in a simple, net-like structure.

Weirder still, the cells making up this neural mesh communicate with one another by squirting out peptides that then diffuse through the hydra's body, activating matching receptors on other cells.

"There are hundreds of neural peptides in Hydra, each of which could be a different channel of communication," says Hawk.

"To me, that's the most exciting thing. This should open up a whole area that no one has ever explored before."

To test the concept, Hawk and his colleagues genetically altered specimens of C. elegans to lose their ability to feel full. These hungry worms exhibited foraging behaviors no matter how much food they'd consumed, giving the researchers a clear activity to watch for in their mutants.

From this group of worms they created two new lines one with the gene for a hydra neuropeptide, and another with the corresponding receptor gene.

The offspring between the two families brought the two halves together into a single nervous system. Without their usual 'I'm full' brain circuit in operation, they had to rely on the hydra neuropeptides to signal an end to meal time.

The successful swap is just the first step. Thanks to the way hydra neuropeptides operate, it's possible to separate the neurons that use them to signal and have them communicate long-distance.

"It gives you more flexibility as a researcher to manipulate neurons that are not adjacent to each other," says Coln-Ramos.

This specific combination of messenger and receptor, dubbed HySyn, could be just the start of a vast tool-kit of replacement transmitters that researchers could use to decipher the intricacies of neural circuitry.

This research was published in Nature Communications.

Visit link:
Scientists Rewired The Brain of a Mutant Worm Using Parts From a Hydra - ScienceAlert

Read the Rest...

Doctors Urge Expanded Use of Ultrasound Contrast Agents – Business Wire

§ October 5th, 2021 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Doctors Urge Expanded Use of Ultrasound Contrast Agents – Business Wire

CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Ultrasound experts today urged the health care community to work to expand utilization of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) in order to offer patients broader access to low-cost, safe and reliable diagnostic imaging.

UCAs are currently approved for imaging the heart and liver in adult and pediatric patients, and additionally for imaging the urinary tract of pediatric patients, according to Dr Stephanie Wilson, who spoke today at the 35th Advances in Contrast Ultrasound conference in its opening plenary session in Chicago. Dr. Wilson is a professor of radiology and gastroenterology at the University of Calgary and Co-President of the International Contrast Ultrasound Society (ICUS).

According to Dr. Wilson, UCAs are versatile imaging agents that also are useful for imaging tumors and organ systems throughout the body, including the kidney, bowel, breast, pancreas, prostate and carotid arteries.

After decades of safe and routine use of UCAs in modern medical centers around the world, it is clear that adult and pediatric patients benefit from broader use of UCAs to enhance diagnostic ultrasound exams, she added.

According to Dr. Wilson, a single intravenous injection of a UCA will show multiple organs throughout the body, and several organs may be involved with the same pathology.

It makes absolutely no sense to ignore pathology that is clearly seen in adjacent organs simply because the FDA has only approved ultrasound contrast agents on an organ-by-organ basis, instead of providing a more clinically logical approval for whole body imaging, she said.

Doctors expanding UCA uses

Doctors are increasingly using UCAs for unapproved uses and professional guidelines now support these additional indications, according to Dr. Richard G. Barr, who also spoke during the plenary session. Dr. Barr is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, a professor of radiology at Northeast Ohio Medical University, and a member of the ICUS board of directors.

Doctors are permitted to use approved drugs for unapproved uses if they believe doing so is medically supported and appropriate for their patients, he said.

Dr. Barr also noted that doctors are now reimbursed for unapproved off-label uses of UCAs.

According to Dr. Wilson, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a radiation-free imaging technique that is often equivalent or superior to more expensive imaging tools like MR or CT. She said CEUS also allows for dynamic and repeat examinations, is highly effective for monitoring a patients response to therapy, and unlike MRI and CT it can be used in patients with kidney failure or allergy to iodinated contrast agents used in CT.

Dr. Wilson noted that CEUS is a dynamic, real time scanning tool that offers a highly reliable method of imaging all soft tissue tumors in the abdomen and pelvis, and allows physicians to identify, characterize and stage tumors of the liver, kidney, prostate, breast and other organ systems.

In addition, CEUS of the heart and carotid arteries can help doctors assess cardiovascular abnormalities and stratify a patients risk of heart attack or stroke, according to Dr. Steven Feinstein, director of the conference. Dr. Feinstein is also Co-President of ICUS and a professor of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago.

Ultrasound is an extremely valuable front-line imaging tool that offers real time, almost immediate results, so patients can get a speedy diagnosis and quicker access to appropriate therapy, he said. When UCAs are used to enhance the ultrasound scan, clinical outcomes are often improved, redundant downstream tests may be avoided, overall diagnostic imaging costs may be reduced, and hospital workflows may become more efficient.

UCAs are radiation-free imaging agents

UCAs (sometimes also known as ultrasound enhancing agents) are biocompatible imaging agents that are injected during an ultrasound scan to enhance the resolution of an ultrasound image. They contain microscopic gas-filled microbubbles that are smaller than red blood cells. These microbubbles reflect ultrasound signals as they flow unimpeded through the bodys circulation and are expelled from the body within minutes after injection.

UCAs contain no dye and present no known risk of liver or kidney damage. In addition, while CT and MRI procedures sometimes require sedation to limit the movement of patients, especially children, sedation is not required during the CEUS exam.

UCAs also have an extremely favorable safety profile, according to Dr. Michael Main, Saint Lukes Health System Senior Vice-President and CEO of Saint Lukes Physician Group in Kansas City.. Dr, Main is an expert on UCA safety.

A large body of scientific data now makes it clear that UCAs are extremely safe for the overwhelming number of our patients, across a wide range of medical uses, he said.

Three UCAs are currently used in the United States -- Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging), Lumason (Bracco) and Optison (GE Healthcare).

Whole body approval

Dr. Wilson and Dr. Barr called on the FDA to work with UCA manufacturers on expanding approved uses of UCAs for whole body imaging.

Limited regulatory approvals restrict opportunities for professional education and vendor-specific professional training, and this ultimately hampers patient access to optimal diagnostic imaging, according to Dr. Barr.

He said that broader approved uses would also expand labeling information and instructions for optimal use.

Physicians are generally allowed to discuss off-label uses during educational presentations, according to Dr. Barr, but vendors are limited in their ability to promote off-label uses, even based on studies in respected medical and scientific journals, unless they do so in response to an unsolicited question and follow strict compliance requirements.

Remember that these are systemic agents. If you are looking at the liver and you happen to see something in the kidney, are you supposed to pretend you didnt see it? he asked.

The only practical difference between CEUS imaging of the liver -- which is approved -- and CEUS imaging of the neighboring kidney -- which is not yet approved -- is moving the external ultrasound transducer, Dr. Barr added.

Cardiac imaging would also benefit from more holistic regulation and approval of these agents, according to Dr. Thomas Porter, Chair of Cardiology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. Dr. Porter also is a member of the ICUS Board and a leading expert in off-label use of CEUS for stress echocardiography and cardiac perfusion imaging.

It is clear that CEUS can play a pivotal role in accurately diagnosing cardiovascular disease, and broader approvals for these agents would align with standards of care that are well established throughout the world, Dr. Porter said.

ABOUT ICUS:

The International Contrast Ultrasound Society (ICUS) is a grassroots, non-profit medical society dedicated to advancing the safe and appropriate use of contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to improve patient care. ICUS members include physicians, scientists, and other ultrasound imaging professionals in approximately 60 countries. For more information about ICUS, please visit http://www.ICUS-SOCIETY.org.

See the original post:
Doctors Urge Expanded Use of Ultrasound Contrast Agents - Business Wire

Read the Rest...

« Older Entries



Page 11234..1020..»