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Robotic Surgery – ololrmc.com

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Robotic Surgery – ololrmc.com

About Robotic Surgery Robotic surgery, or robot-assisted surgery, allows our surgeons to perform many types of complex procedures with more precision, flexibility and control than is possible with conventional techniques. Robotic surgery is an advanced form of minimally invasive or laparoscopic (small incision) surgery where surgeons use a computer-controlled robot to assist them in certain surgical procedures.

Our specially trained surgeons can use the da Vinci System to perform complex surgeries with a minimally invasive approach that disturbs less tissue surrounding the area being worked on, minimizing and controlling bleeding. The robotic surgical system includes a camera arm and mechanical arms with surgical instruments attached to them. The surgeon controls the arms while seated at a computer console near the operating table. The console gives the surgeon a high-definition, magnified, 3-D view of the surgical site. The robot's "hands" have a high degree of dexterity, allowing surgeons the ability to operate in very tight spaces in the body that would otherwise only be accessible through open (long incision) surgery. The surgical team supervises the robot at the patient's bedside.

Surgeon seated at the computer console of the da Vinci Xi Surgical System

The da Vinci Xi Surgical System

Robotic surgery offers many benefits to patients compared to open surgery, including:

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Impact of nanotechnology – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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The of nanotechnology' extends from its medical, ethical, mental, legal and environmental applications, to fields such as engineering, biology, chemistry, computing, materials science, and communications.

Major benefits of nanotechnology include improved manufacturing methods, water purification systems, energy systems, physical enhancement, nanomedicine, better food production methods, nutrition and large-scale infrastructure auto-fabrication.[vague] Nanotechnology's reduced size may allow for automation of tasks which were previously inaccessible due to physical restrictions, which in turn may reduce labor, land, or maintenance requirements placed on humans.

Potential risks include environmental, health, and safety issues; transitional effects such as displacement of traditional industries as the products of nanotechnology become dominant, which are of concern to privacy rights advocates. These may be particularly important if potential negative effects of nanoparticles are overlooked.

Whether nanotechnology merits special government regulation is a controversial issue. Regulatory bodies such as the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Health & Consumer Protection Directorate of the European Commission have started dealing with the potential risks of nanoparticles. The organic food sector has been the first to act with the regulated exclusion of engineered nanoparticles from certified organic produce, firstly in Australia and the UK,[1] and more recently in Canada, as well as for all food certified to Demeter International standards[2]

Potential risks of nanotechnology can broadly be grouped into four areas:

The presence of nanomaterials (materials that contain nanoparticles) is not in itself a threat. It is only certain aspects that can make them risky, in particular their mobility and their increased reactivity. Only if certain properties of certain nanoparticles were harmful to living beings or the environment would we be faced with a genuine hazard. In this case it can be called nanopollution.

In addressing the health and environmental impact of nanomaterials we need to differentiate between two types of nanostructures: (1) Nanocomposites, nanostructured surfaces and nanocomponents (electronic, optical, sensors etc.), where nanoscale particles are incorporated into a substance, material or device (fixed nano-particles); and (2) free nanoparticles, where at some stage in production or use individual nanoparticles of a substance are present. These free nanoparticles could be nanoscale species of elements, or simple compounds, but also complex compounds where for instance a nanoparticle of a particular element is coated with another substance (coated nanoparticle or core-shell nanoparticle).

There seems to be consensus that, although one should be aware of materials containing fixed nanoparticles, the immediate concern is with free nanoparticles.

Nanoparticles are very different from their everyday counterparts, so their adverse effects cannot be derived from the known toxicity of the macro-sized material. This poses significant issues for addressing the health and environmental impact of free nanoparticles.

To complicate things further, in talking about nanoparticles it is important that a powder or liquid containing nanoparticles almost never be monodisperse [1], but contain instead a range of particle sizes. This complicates the experimental analysis as larger nanoparticles might have different properties from smaller ones. Also, nanoparticles show a tendency to aggregate, and such aggregates often behave differently from individual nanoparticles.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has conducted initial research on how nanoparticles interact with the bodys systems and how workers might be exposed to nano-sized particles in the manufacturing or industrial use of nanomaterials. NIOSH currently offers interim guidelines for working with nanomaterials consistent with the best scientific knowledge.[3] At The National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory of NIOSH, studies investigating the filter penetration of nanoparticles on NIOSH-certified and EU marked respirators, as well as non-certified dust masks have been conducted.[4] These studies found that the most penetrating particle size range was between 30 and 100 nanometers, and leak size was the largest factor in the number of nanoparticles found inside the respirators of the test dummies.[5][6]

In "The Consumer Product Safety Commission and Nanotechnology,"[7] E. Marla Felcher suggests that the Consumer Product Safety Commission, which is charged with protecting the public against unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with consumer products, is ill-equipped to oversee the safety of complex, high-tech products made using nanotechnology.

Longer-term concerns center on the impact that new technologies will have for society at large, and whether these could possibly lead to either a post-scarcity economy, or alternatively exacerbate the wealth gap between developed and developing nations. The effects of nanotechnology on the society as a whole, on human health and the environment, on trade, on security, on food systems and even on the definition of "human", have not been characterized or politicized.

The health impact of nanotechnology are the possible effects that the use of nanotechnological materials and devices will have on human health. As nanotechnology is an emerging field, there is great debate regarding to what extent nanotechnology will benefit or pose risks for human health. Nanotechnology's health impact can be split into two aspects: the potential for nanotechnological innovations to have medical applications to cure disease, and the potential health hazards posed by exposure to nanomaterials.

Nanotoxicology is the field which studies potential health risks of nanomaterials. The extremely small size of nanomaterials means that they are much more readily taken up by the human body than larger sized particles. How these nanoparticles behave inside the organism is one of the significant issues that needs to be resolved. The behavior of nanoparticles is a function of their size, shape and surface reactivity with the surrounding tissue. Apart from what happens if non-degradable or slowly degradable nanoparticles accumulate in organs, another concern is their potential interaction with biological processes inside the body: because of their large surface, nanoparticles on exposure to tissue and fluids will immediately adsorb onto their surface some of the macromolecules they encounter. The large number of variables influencing toxicity means that it is difficult to generalise about health risks associated with exposure to nanomaterials each new nanomaterial must be assessed individually and all material properties must be taken into account. Health and environmental issues combine in the workplace of companies engaged in producing or using nanomaterials and in the laboratories engaged in nanoscience and nanotechnology research. It is safe to say that current workplace exposure standards for dusts cannot be applied directly to nanoparticle dusts.

Nanomedicine is the medical application of nanotechnology.[8] The approaches to nanomedicine range from the medical use of nanomaterials, to nanoelectronic biosensors, and even possible future applications of molecular nanotechnology. Nanomedicine seeks to deliver a valuable set of research tools and clinically helpful devices in the near future.[9][10] The National Nanotechnology Initiative expects new commercial applications in the pharmaceutical industry that may include advanced drug delivery systems, new therapies, and in vivo imaging.[11] Neuro-electronic interfaces and other nanoelectronics-based sensors are another active goal of research. Further down the line, the speculative field of molecular nanotechnology believes that cell repair machines could revolutionize medicine and the medical field.

Nanopollution is a generic name for all waste generated by nanodevices or during the nanomaterials manufacturing process. Nanowaste is mainly the group of particles that are released into the environment, or the particles that are thrown away when still on their products. The thrown away nanoparticles are usually still functioning how they are supposed to (still have their individual properties), they are just not being properly used anymore. Most of the time, they are lost due to contact with different environments. Silver nanoparticles, for example, they are used a lot in clothes to control odor, those particles are lost when washing them.[12] The fact that they are still functioning and are so small is what makes nanowaste a concern. It can float in the air and might easily penetrate animal and plant cells causing unknown effects. Due to its small size, nanoparticles can have different properties than their own material when on a bigger size, and they are also functioning more efficiently because of its greater surface area. Most human-made nanoparticles do not appear in nature, so living organisms may not have appropriate means to deal with nanowaste.

To properly assess the health hazards of engineered nanoparticles the whole life cycle of these particles needs to be evaluated, including their fabrication, storage and distribution, application and potential abuse, and disposal. The impact on humans or the environment may vary at different stages of the life cycle. One already known consequences to metals exposure is shown by silver, if exposed to humans in a certain concentration, it can cause illnesses such as argyria and argyrosis.[13]Silver can also cause some environmental problems. Due to its antimicrobial properties (antibacterial), when encountered in the soil it can kill beneficial bacteria that are important to keep the soil healthy.[14] Environmental assessment is justified as nanoparticles present novel environmental impacts. Scrinis raises concerns[15] about nano-pollution, and argues that it is not currently possible to precisely predict or control the ecological impacts of the release of these nano-products into the environment.

Metals, in particular, have a really strong bonds. Their properties follow up to the nanoscale as well. Metals can stay and damage the environment for a long time, since they hardly degrade or get destroyed.[16] With the increase in use of nanotechnology, it is predicted that the nanowaste of metals will keep increasing, and until a solution is found for that problem, that waste will keep accumulating in the environment. On the other hand, some possible future applications of nanotechnology have the potential to benefit the environment. Nanofiltration, based on the use of membranes with extremely small pores smaller than 10nm (perhaps composed of nanotubes) are suitable for a mechanical filtration for the removal of ions or the separation of different fluids. A couple of studies have found a solution to filtrate and extract those nanoparticles from water.[17] The process is still being studied but simulations have been giving a total of about 90% to 99% removal of nanowaste particles from the water at an upgraded waste water treatment plant. Once the particles are separated from the water, they go to the landfill with the rest of the solids.[18] Furthermore, magnetic nanoparticles offer an effective and reliable method to remove heavy metal contaminants from waste water. Using nanoscale particles increases the efficiency to absorb the contaminants and is comparatively inexpensive compared to traditional precipitation and filtration methods. One current method to recover nanoparticles is the Cloud Point Extraction. With this technique, gold nanoparticles and some other types of particles that are heat conductors are able to be extracted from aqueous solutions. The process consists of a heating section of the solution that contains the nanoparticles, and then centrifuged in order to separate the layers and then separate the nanoparticles.[19]

Furthermore, nanotechnology could potentially have a great impact on clean energy production. Research is underway to use nanomaterials for purposes including more efficient solar cells, practical fuel cells, and environmentally friendly batteries.

Significant debate exists relating to the question of whether nanotechnology or nanotechnology-based products merit special government regulation. This debate is related to the circumstances in which it is necessary and appropriate to assess new substances prior to their release into the market, community and environment.

Regulatory bodies such as the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration in the U.S. or the Health & Consumer Protection Directorate of the European Commission have started dealing with the potential risks posed by nanoparticles. So far, neither engineered nanoparticles nor the products and materials that contain them are subject to any special regulation regarding production, handling or labelling. The Material Safety Data Sheet that must be issued for some materials often does not differentiate between bulk and nanoscale size of the material in question and even when it does these MSDS are advisory only.

Limited nanotechnology labeling and regulation may exacerbate potential human and environmental health and safety issues associated with nanotechnology.[20] It has been argued that the development of comprehensive regulation of nanotechnology will be vital to ensure that the potential risks associated with the research and commercial application of nanotechnology do not overshadow its potential benefits.[21] Regulation may also be required to meet community expectations about responsible development of nanotechnology, as well as ensuring that public interests are included in shaping the development of nanotechnology.[22]

Beyond the toxicity risks to human health and the environment which are associated with first-generation nanomaterials, nanotechnology has broader societal impact and poses broader social challenges. Social scientists have suggested that nanotechnology's social issues should be understood and assessed not simply as "downstream" risks or impacts. Rather, the challenges should be factored into "upstream" research and decision-making in order to ensure technology development that meets social objectives[23]

Many social scientists and organizations in civil society suggest that technology assessment and governance should also involve public participation[24][25][26][27]

The last few years has seen a gold rush to claim patents at the nanoscale. Over 800 nano-related patents were granted in 2003, and the numbers are increasing year to year. Corporations are already taking out broad-ranging patents on nanoscale discoveries and inventions. For example, two corporations, NEC and IBM, hold the basic patents on carbon nanotubes, one of the current cornerstones of nanotechnology. Carbon nanotubes have a wide range of uses, and look set to become crucial to several industries from electronics and computers, to strengthened materials to drug delivery and diagnostics. Carbon nanotubes are poised to become a major traded commodity with the potential to replace major conventional raw materials. However, as their use expands, anyone seeking to (legally) manufacture or sell carbon nanotubes, no matter what the application, must first buy a license from NEC or IBM. [2] [3]

Nanotechnologies may provide new solutions for the millions of people in developing countries who lack access to basic services, such as safe water, reliable energy, health care, and education. The United Nations has set Millennium Development Goals for meeting these needs. The 2004 UN Task Force on Science, Technology and Innovation noted that some of the advantages of nanotechnology include production using little labor, land, or maintenance, high productivity, low cost, and modest requirements for materials and energy.

Potential opportunities of nanotechnologies to help address critical international development priorities include improved water purification systems, energy systems, medicine and pharmaceuticals, food production and nutrition, and information and communications technologies. Nanotechnologies are already incorporated in products that are on the market. Other nanotechnologies are still in the research phase, while others are concepts that are years or decades away from development.

Protection of the environment, human health and worker safety in developing countries often suffers from a combination of factors that can include but are not limited to lack of robust environmental, human health, and worker safety regulations; poorly or unenforced regulation which is linked to a lack of physical (e.g., equipment) and human capacity (i.e., properly trained regulatory staff). Often, these nations require assistance, particularly financial assistance, to develop the scientific and institutional capacity to adequately assess and manage risks, including the necessary infrastructure such as laboratories and technology for detection.

However, concerns are frequently raised that the claimed benefits of nanotechnology will not be evenly distributed, and that any benefits (including technical and/or economic) associated with nanotechnology will only reach affluent nations.[28] The majority of nanotechnology research and development - and patents for nanomaterials and products - is concentrated in developed countries (including the United States, Japan, Germany, Canada and France). In addition, most patents related to nanotechnology are concentrated amongst few multinational corporations, including IBM, Micron Technologies, Advanced Micro Devices and Intel.[29] This has led to fears that it will be unlikely that developing countries will have access to the infrastructure, funding and human resources required to support nanotechnology research and development, and that this is likely to exacerbate such inequalities.

Producers in developing countries could also be disadvantaged by the replacement of natural products (including rubber, cotton, coffee and tea) by developments in nanotechnology. These natural products are important export crops for developing countries, and many farmers' livelihoods depend on them. It has been argued that their substitution with industrial nano-products could negatively affect the economies of developing countries, that have traditionally relied on these export crops.[28]

Ray Kurzweil has speculated in The Singularity is Near that people who work in unskilled labor jobs for a livelihood may become the first human workers to be displaced by the constant use of nanotechnology in the workplace, noting that layoffs often affect the jobs based around the lowest technology level before attacking jobs with the highest technology level possible.[30] It has been noted that every major economic era has stimulated a global revolution both in the kinds of jobs that are available to people and the kind of training they need to achieve these jobs, and there is concern that the world's educational systems have lagged behind in preparing students for the "Nanotech Age".[31]

It has also been speculated that nanotechnology may give rise to nanofactories which may have superior capabilities to conventional factories due to their small carbon and physical footprint on the global and regional environment. The miniaturization and transformation of the multi-acre conventional factory into the nanofactory may not interfere with their ability to deliver a high quality product; the product may be of even greater quality due to the lack of human errors in the production stages. Nanofactory systems may use precise atomic precisioning and contribute to making superior quality products that the "bulk chemistry" method used in 20th century and early 21st currently cannot produce. These advances might shift the computerized workforce in an even more complex direction, requiring skills in genetics, nanotechnology, and robotics.[32][33]

Molecular manufacturing is a potential future subfield of nanotechnology that would make it possible to build complex structures at atomic precision.[34] Molecular manufacturing requires significant advances in nanotechnology, but once achieved could produce highly advanced products at low costs and in large quantities in nanofactories weighing a kilogram or more.[34][35] When nanofactories gain the ability to produce other nanofactories production may only be limited by relatively abundant factors such as input materials, energy and software.[35]

The products of molecular manufacturing could range from cheaper, mass-produced versions of known high-tech products to novel products with added capabilities in many areas of application. Some applications that have been suggested are advanced smart materials, nanosensors, medical nanorobots and space travel.[34] Additionally, molecular manufacturing could be used to cheaply produce highly advanced, durable weapons, which is an area of special concern regarding the impact of nanotechnology.[35] Being equipped with compact computers and motors these could be increasingly autonomous and have a large range of capabilities.[35]

According to Chris Phoenix and Mike Treder from the Center for Responsible Nanotechnology as well as Anders Sandberg from the Future of Humanity Institute molecular manufacturing is the application of nanotechnology that poses the most significant global catastrophic risk.[35][36] Several nanotechnology researchers state that the bulk of risk from nanotechnology comes from the potential to lead to war, arms races and destructive global government.[35][36][37] Several reasons have been suggested why the availability of nanotech weaponry may with significant likelihood lead to unstable arms races (compared to e.g. nuclear arms races): (1) A large number of players may be tempted to enter the race since the threshold for doing so is low;[35] (2) the ability to make weapons with molecular manufacturing will be cheap and easy to hide;[35] (3) therefore lack of insight into the other parties' capabilities can tempt players to arm out of caution or to launch preemptive strikes;[35][38] (4) molecular manufacturing may reduce dependency on international trade,[35] a potential peace-promoting factor;[39] (5) wars of aggression may pose a smaller economic threat to the aggressor since manufacturing is cheap and humans may not be needed on the battlefield.[35]

Since self-regulation by all state and non-state actors seems hard to achieve,[40] measures to mitigate war-related risks have mainly been proposed in the area of international cooperation.[35][41] International infrastructure may be expanded giving more sovereignty to the international level. This could help coordinate efforts for arms control.[42] International institutions dedicated specifically to nanotechnology (perhaps analogously to the International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA) or general arms control may also be designed.[41] One may also jointly make differential technological progress on defensive technologies, a policy that players should usually favour.[35] The Center for Responsible Nanotechnology also suggest some technical restrictions.[43] Improved transparency regarding technological capabilities may be another important facilitator for arms-control.[44]

A grey goo is another catastrophic scenario, which was proposed by Eric Drexler in his 1986 book Engines of Creation,[45] has been analyzed by Freitas in "Some Limits to Global Ecophagy by Biovorous Nanoreplicators, with Public Policy Recommendations" [4] and has been a theme in mainstream media and fiction.[46][47] This scenario involves tiny self-replicating robots that consume the entire biosphere using it as a source of energy and building blocks. Nanotech experts including Drexler now discredit the scenario. According to Chris Phoenix a "So-called grey goo could only be the product of a deliberate and difficult engineering process, not an accident".[48] With the advent of nano-biotech, a different scenario called green goo has been forwarded. Here, the malignant substance is not nanobots but rather self-replicating biological organisms engineered through nanotechnology.

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Robotic General Surgery – Albany Medical Center

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Robotic General Surgery – Albany Medical Center

Surgery is generally the most effective treatment option fora wide range ofconditions. Yet, traditional open surgery usually requires a large incision and has many drawbacks. Fortunately, Albany Medical Center offers robotic assisted, minimally invasive general surgical procedures that eliminate the need for traditional open surgery and provide numerous benefits to patients with various types of conditions.

Robotic Procedures

Robotic Assisted Gastric Bypass Surgery Weight loss surgery (also known as bariatric surgery) is one of the most effective treatments for obesity through a procedure known as gastric bypass. Gastric bypass surgery resizes the stomach limiting the food intake and calorie absorption which results in weight loss. Gastric bypass surgery can be performed open or laparoscopically, however, some patients are candidates for robotic gastric bypass surgery using the da Vinci robot.

Robotic Asisted Cholecystectomy Robotic assisted cholecystectomy is the surgicalremoval of the gallbladder.For patients with a diseased gallbladder or whose symptoms cannot be controlled through medications, it may be recommended to have the gallbladder surgically removed. Through a single incision in the patient's naval using the da Vinci robot, the single port robotic assisted cholecystectomy can be performed.

Robotic Assisted Hernia Repair A hernia occurs when part of the internal organ bulges through a weak area of muscle. Hernias are often found in the abdomen or groin. Hernias can be repaired by traditional open or laparoscopic surgery. For appropriate patients, the da Vinci robot may also be used to surgically repair the hernia.

Click here for a list of our robotic general surgeons.

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Robotic Surgery – The Institute for Women’s Health

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What is da Vinci surgery?

The da Vinci Surgical System is one of the most effective, least invasive treatment options for a range of uterine conditions. The da Vinci Surgical System enables surgeons to perform with unmatched precision and control using only a few small incisions.

Although the general term robotic surgery is often used to refer to the technology, this term can give the impression that the robot is performing the surgery. In contrast, the da Vinci Surgical System cannot in any manner run on its own. It is actually robotically-assisted surgery. The System is designed to seamlessly replicate the movement of the surgeons hands with the tips of micro-instruments. The System cannot make decisions, nor can it perform any type of movement or maneuver without the surgeons direct input.

Devices for robotically-assisted surgery are designed to perform regulated and controlled movements after being programmed by a surgeon. The da Vinci Surgical System is a computer-enhanced system that interposes a computer between the surgeons hands and the tips of micro-instruments. The system replicates the surgeons movements in real time.

The da Vinci Surgical System was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in August of 2005. Since then, our surgeons at the Institute For Womens Health have successfully performed over 500 of these procedures.

For more information, please visit http://www.davincisurgery.com

See more at: http://www.ifwh.org/en/services/147-robotic-surgery#sthash.7YClskQ8.dpuf

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Robotic Surgery – Excela Health

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The da Vinci Robotic Surgery System

High tech and human health rise to a new level of cooperation in the da Vinci robotic surgery system, a new technique that has been called the most effective, least invasive surgery. Because of the sophistication of the da Vinci system, now even relatively complex operations can be performed through very tiny incisions, so the patient recoversquicker, with less pain, less scarring, and little blood loss. Depending on the specific procedure, many patients go home the very same day. The only da Vinci system in the area outside of Pittsburgh is located at Excela Health.

How the Robotic Surgical System WorksWith da Vinci, the surgeon sees high definition, three-dimensional images from inside the body ten times better than the naked eye. The surgeon controls the da Vinci system, which translates the surgeon's hand movements into smaller, more precise movements of tiny instruments inside the body. These computer-guided instruments allow for more precise control than ever before.And while it is called a "robot", the system cannot act on its own; the surgeon always remains in total control. The da Vinci surgical system is used in procedures that treat a range of conditions:

Benefits of da Vinci Robotic Surgery The da Vinci system has been used successfully throughout the world in thousands of procedures and for a variety of conditions. Because of the magnified field of vision and tiny instruments, among other factors, there are many potential benefits to this type of surgery that include:

Less pain Less blood loss Shorter hospital stay Fewer complications Faster return to normal activities Less scarring Fewer transfusions Less risk of infections

Your surgeon will help you decideyour surgical options, and whether the precision of da Vinci can help with your condition.

This handyflierdescribes the benefits of robotic surgery, your surgical options at Excela Health and our team of Robotic Surgeons.

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Sports Medicine Research – Nationwide Children’s Hospital

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Our staff of doctors, athletic trainers and physical therapists is trained to provide age-appropriate care for our patients. We emphasize the importance of early injury recognition and treatment in order to prevent recurring injuries. In addition to treatment, we partner with parents and coaches to focus on injury prevention, conditioning and age-appropriate activities.

Researchers at Nationwide Childrens Hospital have conducted studies on sports injuries, functional body control, injury prevention and more. In addition to the information on this page, browse our articles or find an answer to a frequently asked question.

The Center for Injury Research and Policy (CIRP) at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital is home to the only team in the country collecting sports injury surveillance data in a national sample of high school athletes. Through the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study, certified athletic trainers from U.S. high schools use an internet-based data collection tool, RIO (Reporting Information Online), to prospectively report athletic exposure and injury data for athletes participating in 18 sports.

Learn more about The National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study

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Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine Society

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PRISMSPORTS.ORG

The purpose of PRISM is to foster and stimulate interdisciplinary professional education, research and interest in pediatric and adolescent sports medicine and, in this regard, to promote and participate in high-quality research and the advancement of understanding in the field of pediatric and adolescent sports medicine.

Be a part of a collective group of focused individuals that are united in the mission of PRISM. As the PRISM Society grows from its infancy phase, we invite you to take this journey with us and make this society a unique network of resources.

PRISM is not your traditional membership society. The whole reason for its existence is to join individuals together in order to service children and adolescents as an inter-professional team of experts in sports medicine. Through collaboration, members from multi-disciplines can share best practices and find new, less invasive treatments that make the road to recovery a blur of speed for all patients/clients.

PRISM has an all-encompassing annual meeting. Once the word spreads of the education and research being shared, many programs will be developed so specifically target our members needs. At this time, we will be offering CME for physicians and are looking to expand to offer continuing education credit in all the fields we represent.

PRISM has identified key areas to focus on research grant funding. The list below are specialty areas of research working groups. We will have updates on these areas in the upcoming months. Eventually, PRISM will be able to fund their own grants in these areas in order to develop and maintain evidence-based best practices.

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Kids.Net.Au – Encyclopedia > Nanotechnology

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Nanotechnology refers to exploratory engineering at the atomic and molecular level, where the nanometer is a common unit of length. The term is sometimes used to describe any microscopic technology. Physically, real nanotechnology relates to sizes of only a few atoms' width. Implementing nanotechnology in its fullest sense would require the ability to directly manipulate atoms or molecules. It is sometimes referred to as Molecular nanotechnology to distinguish it from Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS).

A more neutral term that does not imply the hype and speculation that surround this field is "molecular engineering" - progress towards actual engineering at these scales is discussed in that article. This article focuses on the longer-term potential and speculations surrounding 'nanotechnology' as it was originally conceived.

Ralph Merkle has compared today's chemistry to an attempt to build interesting Lego brick constructions while wearing boxing gloves. Because we currently have no tools that allow us to place a particular atom in a particular place (so that it bonds in a predictable way with another particular atom), we must work with statistically large numbers of atoms. As a result, when we cause a particular chemical reaction, we frequently get a mix of several different product species. The reaction is often followed by a physical filtering process to extract the species we actually wanted, with the other species discarded as waste. Nanotechnology could therefore offer much cleaner manufacturing processes than are available with today's bulk technology.

The first mention of nanotechnology (not yet using that name) was in a talk given by Richard Feynman in 1959, entitled There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom. Feynman suggested a means to develop the ability to manipulate atoms and molecules directly, by developing a set of one-tenth-scale machine tools analogous to those found in any machine shop. These small tools would be used to develop and operate a next generation of one-hundredth-scale machine tools, and so forth. As the sizes get smaller, it would be necessary to redesign some tools because the relative strength of various forces would change. Gravity would become less important, surface tension would become more important, van der Waals attraction would become important, etc. Feynman mentioned these scaling issues during his talk. The feasibility of his proposal has never been effectively refuted.

The term nanotechnology was first used by K. Eric Drexler in his 1986 book Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology.

In the fourth chapter, Drexler introduces self-replication (see also Von Neumann machine), another powerful premise of nanotechnology. Cells build copies of themselves in order to reproduce, and human-designed molecular robots could do the same thing. This would mean that after the enormous research expense of designing and constructing the first molecular robot capable of self-replication, the next trillion robots would on the order of an equal mass in vegetables. Further, to the owners it would seem just as (un)amazing.

These same generally capable robots, called assemblers, could then build more special-purpose objects that humans would find directly useful: houses, kitchen widgets, cars, furniture, medical instruments, spaceships, etc. Like the assemblers themselves, these products would be extremely cheap by comparison with those produced today. Specifically, the inputs to any such manufacturing process would be raw materials (atoms), energy, design software, and time.

Another application of nanotechnology is utility fog [[1] (http://discuss.foresight.org/~josh/Ufog)] -- in which a cloud of networked microscopic robots (simpler than assemblers) changes its shape and properties to form macroscopic objects and tools in accordance with software commands. Rather than modify the current practices of consuming material goods in different forms, utility fog would simply replace most physical objects.

Whilst progress has been made in producing ever-smaller computer circuits and nanowires, and manipulating individual atoms, constructing real nanomachines is currently well beyond our present capabilities and is generally believed to be at least decades away. Many doubt that controllable self-replicating nanobots are possible at all, citing the possibility of mutations removing any control and favouring reproduction of the mutant pathogenic variations. Advocates counter that bacteria are designed to mutate, and nanobot mutation can be prevented by common error-correcting techniques used in computers today. Research in this area has included the development of simulation software, such as NanoCAD.

Despite its current infeasibility, there has been much speculation about the impact of nanotechnology on economics and law. Some believe that money would cease to be of use and taxation would cease to be feasible. Others conjecture that nanotechnology would elicit a strong public-opinion backlash, as has occurred recently around genetically modified plants and the prospect of human cloning. Whatever the exact effects, nanotechnology is likely to upset existing economic structures, as it should reduce the scarcity of manufactured goods and make many more goods (such as food and health aids) manufacturable.

Most futurists and all economists believe there would still be a need for money, in the form of unforgeable digital cash. It might be used to buy goods and services that are unique, or limited within the solar system. These might include: matter, energy, information, real estate, design services, entertainment services, legal services, fame, political power, or the attention of other people to your political/religious/philisophical message. Beyond that, there is war, even between prosperous states, and non-economic goals to consider.

Most people believe that virtual reality will not much reduce interest in obtaining limited resources, such as a chance to talk to the real president of a major country, or owning part of the real Jerusalem, or having a famous celebrity say nice things about you in a digitally-signed document, or gaining the mining rights to the larger near-earth asteroids. Demand will always exceed supply for some things, and there will continue to be a political economy in any case.

Beyond the fantasy scenarios, nanotechnology has daunting risks. It enables cheaper and more destructive conventional weapons. Also, nanotechnology permits weapons of mass destruction that self-replicate, as viruses and cancer cells do when attacking the human body. There is general agreement that self-replication should be permitted only very controlled conditions, if at all.

There is a fear that nanomechanical robots (nanobots) allowed to self-replicate could consume the entire planet in their hunger for raw materials, or simply crowd out natural life, out-competing it for energy (as happened historically when blue-green algae appeared and outcompeted earlier life forms. This situation is sometimes called the "grey goo" or "ecophagy" scenario. It is considered one of the more likely ends of a technological singularity.

In light of these dangers, the Foresight Institute (founded by Drexler to prepare for the arrival of future technologies) has drafted a set of guidelines [2] (http://www.foresight.org/guidelines/current) for the ethical development of nanotechnology. These include the banning of self-replicating pseudo-organisms on the Earth's surface, at least, and possibly other places.

Drexler and others have extended the ideas of nanotechnology with two more books, Unbounding the Future: the Nanotechnology Revolution [3] (http://www.foresight.org/UTF/Unbound_LBW/) and Nanosystems: molecular machinery, manufacturing, and computation [4] (http://www.zyvex.com/nanotech/nanosystems). Unbounding the Future is an easy-to-read book that introduces the ideas of nanotechnology in a not-too-technical way, and Nanosystems is an in-depth analysis of several possible nanotechnological devices, with thorough scientific analyses of their feasibility and performance. Another notable work in the same vein is Nanomedicine by Robert Freitas.

Nanotechnology has also become a prominent theme in science fiction [5] (http://www.geocities.com/asnapier/nano/n-sf/), for example with the Borg in Star Trek, Neal Stephenson's book The Diamond Age, and Wil McCarthy's book Bloom[?]. These deal with various dangerous potentials of molecular engineering but in a generally reassuring manner, i.e. even ecophagy is considered to be a livable outcome. Some have compared this to the post-apocalyptic science fiction that presupposed that survival of mutual assured destruction was possible or even desirable.

See also: weapons of mass destruction, molecular engineering, protein engineering

External Links

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Nanotechnology – Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nanotechnology – Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nanotechnology is a part of science and technology about the control of matter on the atomic and molecular scale - this means things that are about 100 nanometres or smaller.[1]

Nanotechnology includes making products that use parts this small, such as electronic devices, catalysts, sensors, etc. To give you an idea of how small that is, there are more nanometres in an inch than there are inches in 400 miles.[2]

To give a international idea of how small that is, there are as many nanometres in a centimetre, as there are centimetres in 100 kilometres.

Nanotechnology brings together scientists and engineers from many different subjects, such as applied physics, materials science, interface and colloid science, device physics, chemistry, supramolecular chemistry (which refers to the area of chemistry that focuses on the non-covalent bonding interactions of molecules), self-replicating machines and robotics, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, biology, biological engineering, and electrical engineering.

Generally, when people talk about nanotechnology, they mean structures of the size 100 nanometers or smaller. There are one million nanometers in a millimeter. Nanotechnology tries to make materials or machines of that size.

People are doing many different types of work in the field of nanotechnology. Most current work looks at making nanoparticles (particles with nanometer size) that have special properties, such as the way they scatter light, absorb X-rays, transport electrical currents or heat, etc. At the more "science fiction" end of the field are attempts to make small copies of bigger machines or really new ideas for structures that make themselves. New materials are possible with nano size structures. It is even possible to work with single atoms.

There has been a lot of discussion about the future of nanotechnology and its dangers. Nanotechnology may be able to invent new materials and instruments which would be very useful, such as in medicine, computers, and making clean electricity (nanotechnology) is helping design the next generation of solar panels, and efficient low-energy lighting). On the other hand, nanotechnology is new and there could be unknown problems. For example if the materials are bad for people's health or for nature. They may have a bad effect on the economy or even big natural systems like the Earth itself. Some groups argue that there should be rules about the use of nanotechnology.

Ideas of nanotechnology were first used in talk "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom", a talk given by the scientist Richard Feynman at an American Physical Society meeting at Caltech on December 29, 1959. Feynman described a way to move individual atoms to build smaller instruments and operate at that scale. Properties such as surface tension and Van der walls force would become very important.

Feynman's simple idea seemed possible. The word "nanotechnology" was explained by Tokyo Science University Professor Norio Taniguchi in a 1974 paper. He said that nanotechnology was the work of changing materials by one atom or by one molecule. In the 1980s this idea was studied by Dr. K. Eric Drexler, who spoke and wrote about the importance of nano-scale events . "Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology" (1986) is thought to be the first book on nanotechnology. Nanotechnology and Nano science started with two key developments: the start of cluster science and the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Soon afterwards, new molecules with carbon were discovered - first fullerenes in 1986 and carbon nanotubes a few years later. In another development, people studied how to make semiconductor nano crystals. Many metal oxide nanoparticles are now used as quantum dots (nanoparticles where the behaviour of single electrons becomes important). In 2000, the United States National Nanotechnology Initiative began to develop science in this field.

Nanotechnology has nanomaterials which can be classified into one, two and three dimensions nanoparticles. This classification is based upon different properties it holds such as scattering of light, absorbing x rays, transport electric current or heat. Nanotechnology has multidisciplinary character affecting multiple traditional technologies and different scientific disciplines. New materials which can be scaled even at atomic size can be manufactured.

At nano scale physical properties of system or particles substantially change. Physical properties such as quantum size effects where electrons move different for very small sizes of particle. Properties such as mechanical, electrical and optical changes when macroscopic system changes to microscopic one which is of utmost importance.

Nano materials and particles can act as catalyst to increase the reaction rate along with that produce better yield as compared to other catalyst. Some of the most interesting properties when particle gets converted to nano scale are substances which usually stop light become transparent (copper); it becomes possible to burn some materials (aluminum); solids turn into liquids at room temperature (gold); insulators become conductors (silicon). A material such as gold, which does not react with other chemicals at normal scales, can be a powerful chemical catalyst at nanoscales. These special properties which we can only see at the nano scale are one of the most interesting things about nanotechnology.

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Department of Urology: Research – Urinary Incontinence …

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Department of Urology: Research – Urinary Incontinence …

Voiding dysfunction and urinary incontinence are conditions in which the bladder is not able to store urine properly (incontinence) or conditions in which the bladder is not able to empty properly (voiding dysfunction).

The incontinence is often categorized by the symptoms that are experienced. The accidental leakage of urine during activities such as coughing, laughing, sneezing, or lifting heavy objects is called stress urinary incontinence (SUI). A sudden and strong feeling of the need to pass urine resulting in urine leakage is called urge urinary incontinence (UUI). A combination of both stress incontinence and urge incontinence is called mixed urinary incontinence MUI).

Voiding dysfunction is often described by symptoms such as frequency (urinating more than 8 times per day), urgency (strong need to urinate) and urine retention (unable to empty your bladder). The problem can affect both women and men. In men, these symptoms can also be due to an enlarged prostate, a condition known as Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH). BPH can cause many of the urinary symptoms and it can be present with other conditions as well.

The following are studies that are enrolling participants. The studies are listed by the condition being studied. (Click on the links for more information)

For more information about stress urinary incontinence, you can visit the sites below:

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Department of Urology: Research - Urinary Incontinence ...

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CoxHealth Robotic Surgery – Cox Hospital – Springfield …

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on CoxHealth Robotic Surgery – Cox Hospital – Springfield …

You've just been diagnosed with a condition requiring surgery. Until recently, your options included traditional surgery with a large open incision, or laparoscopy, which uses small incisions but is typically limited to simple procedures.

Our surgeons perform complex and delicate proceduresthat can result in smaller incisions, less blood loss and shorter hospital stays, according to clinical follow-up with robotic procedures performed at CoxHealth. Data from larger national studies have shown that robotic surgery may also offer less pain and shorter recovery times.

Robotic surgery does not place a robot at the controls. Instead, your surgeon controls every aspect of the surgery with the assistance of a console and robotic arms.A monitor provides the surgeon with a 3-D image of the surgical area, whereas traditional laparoscopy offers a 2-D view.

The surgeon's fingers grasp the master controls below the display with hands and wrists naturally positioned relative to his or her eyes. The "Endo-wrist" features of the operating arms precisely replicate the skilled movements of the surgeon, allowing for precise movements within a small operating space.

Clinical follow-up with robotic procedures performed at CoxHealth has shown:

Data from larger national studies have shown that robotic surgery may also offer less pain andshorter recovery times.

As with all surgical procedures, there are some risks. Talk to your doctor to see if robotic surgery is right for you.

Call 417/269-INFO for more information.

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Piedmont Healthcare | Robotic Surgery in Atlanta …

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Piedmont Healthcare | Robotic Surgery in Atlanta …

You may have heard the term "robotic surgery", but unless you're a medical professional, odds are you don't know much about the benefits it can deliver.

Below are just a few of the procedures that Piedmont surgeons in Atlanta, Fayetteville, and Newnan, Georgia use robotic tools to treat - but there are many more procedures where the precision of a robot may make all the difference in recovery time. If you are evaluating surgical options for a medical issue, be sure to ask your doctor if robot-assisted surgery is an option for you.

Robotic surgery - just another way Piedmont physicians are embracing leading-edge technologies to provide you with better care.

With robotic surgery or robot-assisted surgery surgeons use specialized robotic surgical tools to operate more quickly, efficiently and with greater precision than ever before. Instead of working by hand which typically requires larger incisions - surgeons can manipulate ultra-precise robotic arms to enter a body through small, dime-sized incisions.

The benefits associated with robotic surgery include:

Since 2010, Piedmont surgeons have been using robotic surgery to treat a number of conditions such as prostate cancer and other urological conditions in men, and a number of gynecological conditions in women including endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and hyperplasia. In 2011 Piedmont Transplant started offering donor nephrectomy to our patients the first and only robotic transplant program in the Southeast.

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Nanotechnology – Labor & Industries

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nanotechnology – Labor & Industries

Summary

Longer lasting tennis balls, stain-free clothing, improved paints and coatings and other currently available products have been improved by using nanotechnology-produced materials. Nanotechnology promises to revolutionize medicine and many other industry sectors including electronic, magnetic and optoelectronic, biomedical, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, energy, catalytic and materials applications1,2.

Businesses and governments are fueling the growth of this emerging industry. In 2004 an estimated 6.8 billion dollars were invested world-wide in support of nanotechnology research3. The latest updates and news are available from the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) website (nano.gov).

The term Nanotechnology comes from the nanometer unit of measure. One nanometer is approximately 1/60,000 the diameter of a human hair. The U.S. Department of Energy provides a useful Web site (nano.gov) that puts the nanoscale in perspective.

Nanotechnology builds materials by manipulating matter at the atomic level4. The technologies that support these processes and the nanomaterials that result from them are collectively referred to as nanotechnology.

Some nanomaterials, such as fumed silica, carbon black and titanium dioxide, have been used for years but are just now being labeled nano. New nanomaterials usually have unique structures, surface characteristics or other novel chemical, physical and/or biological properties. Nanomaterials often have no value when considered in isolation but when incorporated into products or processes they enable the product to exhibit some new quality or function5.

Newer nanomaterials include carbon nanotubes and Buckminsterfullerene or Bucky Balls. Carbon nanotubes resemble a lattice of seamlessly rolled-up carbon atoms. This material is extremely light weight, strong, and has other unique properties. Bucky Balls are a unique form of carbon that resembles a soccer ball. The molecule is twice as hard as diamond and is the roundest known molecule of its size6.

The health and environmental risks from exposure to nanomaterials are not yet clearly understood. Many nanomaterials are formed from nanometer-scale particles (nanoparticles) that are initially produced as airborne particles or liquid suspensions. Exposure to these materials during manufacturing and use may occur by inhaling them, skin contact or ingesting them. Very little information is currently available on the most important exposure routes, exposure levels and toxicology. The information that does exist comes primarily from the study of ultra-fine particles (typically defined as particles smaller than 100 nanometers in diameter).

Ultra-fine particles that do not dissolve are more toxic, gram for gram, than larger particles because smaller particles have a relatively larger surface area. There are strong indications that particle surface area and surface chemistry are primarily responsible for the toxic effects seen in cell cultures and test animals. Research is underway to determine the extent to which ultra-fine particles can penetrate the skin. There is also concern that inhaled nanoparticles may move from the lungs into other organs.

Workers in nanotechnology-related industries have the potential to be exposed to uniquely engineered materials with novel sizes, shapes and physical and chemical properties at levels far exceeding ambient concentrations. Much research is still needed to understand the impact of these exposures on health and how best to devise appropriate exposure monitoring and control strategies. Until a clearer picture emerges, the limited evidence available would suggest caution when potential exposures to nanomaterials may occur7,8.

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Nanotechnology – lni.wa.gov

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nanotechnology – lni.wa.gov

Summary

Longer lasting tennis balls, stain-free clothing, improved paints and coatings and other currently available products have been improved by using nanotechnology-produced materials. Nanotechnology promises to revolutionize medicine and many other industry sectors including electronic, magnetic and optoelectronic, biomedical, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, energy, catalytic and materials applications1,2.

Businesses and governments are fueling the growth of this emerging industry. In 2004 an estimated 6.8 billion dollars were invested world-wide in support of nanotechnology research3. The latest updates and news are available from the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) website (nano.gov).

The term Nanotechnology comes from the nanometer unit of measure. One nanometer is approximately 1/60,000 the diameter of a human hair. The U.S. Department of Energy provides a useful Web site (nano.gov) that puts the nanoscale in perspective.

Nanotechnology builds materials by manipulating matter at the atomic level4. The technologies that support these processes and the nanomaterials that result from them are collectively referred to as nanotechnology.

Some nanomaterials, such as fumed silica, carbon black and titanium dioxide, have been used for years but are just now being labeled nano. New nanomaterials usually have unique structures, surface characteristics or other novel chemical, physical and/or biological properties. Nanomaterials often have no value when considered in isolation but when incorporated into products or processes they enable the product to exhibit some new quality or function5.

Newer nanomaterials include carbon nanotubes and Buckminsterfullerene or Bucky Balls. Carbon nanotubes resemble a lattice of seamlessly rolled-up carbon atoms. This material is extremely light weight, strong, and has other unique properties. Bucky Balls are a unique form of carbon that resembles a soccer ball. The molecule is twice as hard as diamond and is the roundest known molecule of its size6.

The health and environmental risks from exposure to nanomaterials are not yet clearly understood. Many nanomaterials are formed from nanometer-scale particles (nanoparticles) that are initially produced as airborne particles or liquid suspensions. Exposure to these materials during manufacturing and use may occur by inhaling them, skin contact or ingesting them. Very little information is currently available on the most important exposure routes, exposure levels and toxicology. The information that does exist comes primarily from the study of ultra-fine particles (typically defined as particles smaller than 100 nanometers in diameter).

Ultra-fine particles that do not dissolve are more toxic, gram for gram, than larger particles because smaller particles have a relatively larger surface area. There are strong indications that particle surface area and surface chemistry are primarily responsible for the toxic effects seen in cell cultures and test animals. Research is underway to determine the extent to which ultra-fine particles can penetrate the skin. There is also concern that inhaled nanoparticles may move from the lungs into other organs.

Workers in nanotechnology-related industries have the potential to be exposed to uniquely engineered materials with novel sizes, shapes and physical and chemical properties at levels far exceeding ambient concentrations. Much research is still needed to understand the impact of these exposures on health and how best to devise appropriate exposure monitoring and control strategies. Until a clearer picture emerges, the limited evidence available would suggest caution when potential exposures to nanomaterials may occur7,8.

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Robotic Surgery – Advocate Health Care

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Robotic Surgery – Advocate Health Care

Minimally Invasive Robotic Surgery in the Northwest Suburbs

Robotic surgery uses a minimally invasive method and isunique because unlike traditional large incision surgeries where surgeons make long cuts through skin, muscle and sometimes bone, minimally invasive procedures are performed through one or more small incisions. Robotic surgery is an extension of minimally invasive surgery as it provides surgeons more precision and flexibility to perform on complex cases.

For patients, the benefits of robotic andminimally invasive surgery include:

Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital in Barrington is proud to bring one of the most advanced minimally invasive surgical technologies currently available close to home - the da Vinci Surgical System. Our experienced physicians at Good Shepherd Hospital are proud to offer the latest breakthroughs in technology and have proven so by performing over 1,900 robotic procedures.

>Find a doctor: Call1-800-323-8622or search ouronline doctor directoryto find a specialist and make an appointment.

Compared to conventional surgery using a long incision, or even minimally invasive techniques such as laparoscopy, robotic-assisted surgery gives surgeons a new level of precision and control. This is especially critical in complex surgeries where as surgeons will have better visualization and flexibility to reach areas often difficult in traditional surgeries.

The robotic platform allows surgeons to perform in difficult areas including the pelvis and upper abdomen.

>Learn moreabout ourprocedures.

As one of the first hospitals in Illinois to offer a comprehensive robotic surgery program, we offer quality care through our years of experience.

>Find a doctor: Call1-800-323-8622or search ouronline doctor directoryto find a specialist and make an appointment.

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Nanotechnology News — ScienceDaily

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Nanotechnology News — ScienceDaily

Feb. 29, 2016 Physicists have discovered a new material that could advance digital technology and open a new frontier in 2-D materials beyond graphene. Truly flat and extremely stable, the material is made up of ... read more Preventing Protein Unfolding Feb. 26, 2016 A computational model shows that polymers can reinforce proteins to prevent them from unfolding under mechanical ... read more Feb. 26, 2016 New research has shown how graphene can be manipulated to create the most light-absorbent material for its weight, to ... read more Feb. 25, 2016 Graphene, a modified form of carbon, offers versatile potential for use in coating machine components and in the field of electronic switches. Physicists have been studying the lubricity of this ... read more Feb. 25, 2016 For the first time, researchers have experimentally demonstrated that copper nanophotonic components can operate successfully in photonic devices -- it was previously believed that only gold and ... read more Feb. 25, 2016 Just as the single-crystal silicon wafer forever changed the nature of communication 60 years ago, a group of researchers is hoping its work with quantum dot solids -- crystals made out of crystals ... read more Fine-Grained Memory Loss Feb. 28, 2016 The ability of shape memory alloys, used as materials for medical stents, to revert to their original shape after an increase in temperature is suppressed at nanometer grain sizes due to effects ... read more Immune Cells Don't Always Ward Off Carbon Nano Invaders Feb. 24, 2016 Scientists have found evidence that some carbon nanomaterials can enter into immune cell membranes, seemingly going undetected by the cell's built-in mechanisms for engulfing and disposing of ... read more New Therapeutic Pathway May Keep Cancer Cells Turned 'Off' Feb. 23, 2016 A new study offers tangible evidence that it is possible to keep osteosarcoma lesions dormant using novel nanomedicines. Osteosarcoma is a cancer that develops in the bones of children and ... read more Nano Dangerously Big Feb. 23, 2016 Keywords such as nano-, personalized-, or targeted medicine sound like bright future. What most people do not know, is that nanomedicines can cause severe undesired effects for actually being too ... read more Feb. 22, 2016 A portable and low-cost diagnostic device has been developed. This microfluidic tool, which has been tested with Ebola, requires no bulky equipment, and is thus ideally suited for use in remote ... read more Feb. 19, 2016 The use of the world's first ultrafast optical microscope allows researchers to probe and visualize matter at the atomic level with mind-bending ... read more Feb. 19, 2016 Over the last decade, one researcher has spent his time figuring out how to deliver chemotherapy drugs into cancerous tumors -- and nowhere else. Now his lab has designed a set of nanoparticles ... read more Feb. 19, 2016 A stretchable nano-scale device has been created to manipulate light. Using the technology, high-tech lenses could one day filter harmful optical radiation without interfering with vision -- or in a ... read more New Nanoparticle With Potential to Treat Ocular Cancer Developed Feb. 18, 2016 Researchers are using nanoparticles to kill tumor cells inside the eye. This nanotechnology also has the potential to be used for multiple applications in ophthalmology and other disciplines, they ... read more Hot Find: Tightly Spaced Objects Could Exchange Millions of Times More Heat Feb. 18, 2016 Scientists have come up with a formula that describes the maximum heat transfer in such tight ... read more Feb. 18, 2016 New research points to an entirely new approach for designing insulin-based pharmaceuticals. The approach could open the door for more personalized medications with fewer side effects for Type 1 ... read more Feb. 17, 2016 New research has identified key factors in the structure of Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH), the main product of the hydration of Portland cement, that could help researchers work out better ... read more Researchers Devise More Efficient Materials for Solar Fuel Cells Feb. 16, 2016 Chemists have developed new high-performing materials for cells that harness sunlight to split carbon dioxide and water into usable fuels like methanol and hydrogen gas. These 'green fuels' ... read more Feb. 16, 2016 Graphene is a single-atomic carbon sheet with a hexagonal honeycomb network. Electrons in graphene take a special electronic state called Dirac-cone where they behave as if they have no mass. This ... read more

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Sports Medicine Devices Market – Transparency Market Research

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Sports Medicine Devices Market – Transparency Market Research

Chapter 1 Introduction

1.1 Report Description

1.2 Market Segmentation

1.3 Research Methodology

1.3.1 Secondary Research

1.3.2 Primary Research

1.4 List of Abbreviations

1.5 Assumptions and Stipulations

Chapter 2 Executive Summary

Chapter 3 Global Sports Medicine Devices Market Overview

3.1 Market Definition and Overview

3.2 Market Drivers

3.2.1 Rising Awareness for Health Fitness Amongst Baby Boomers

3.2.2 Online Marketing Boosting the Growth of Support and Recovery Products

3.2.3 Rise In Number of Sports Medicine Associations

3.2.4 Motivation for Physically Challenged Sports Activities

3.3 Market Restraints

3.3.1 Dominance of Local Players Manufacturing Support and Recovery Products in Sports Medicines

3.3.2 Lack of Reimbursement for Academic Sports Injuries

3.3.3 Reduction in Budget Allocation To Sports

3.4 Market Opportunities

3.4.1 Innovations in implant and prosthetics technology

3.4.2 Development in Performance Monitoring Devices

3.5 Porters Five Force Analysis: Global Sports Medicine Devices Market, for Orthopedic Products

3.5.1 Bargaining Power Of Suppliers

3.5.2 Bargaining Power Of Buyers

3.5.3 Threat From New Entrants

3.5.4 Threat From Substitutes

3.5.5 Competitive Rivalry

3.6 Porters Five Force Analysis: Global Sports Medicine Devices Market, for Sports and Recovery Products

3.6.1 Bargaining Power Of Suppliers

3.6.2 Bargaining Power Of Buyers

3.6.3 Threat From New Entrants

3.6.4 Threat From Substitutes

3.6.5 Competitive rivalry

3.7 Market Attractiveness Analysis: Global Sports Medicine Devices Market, by Geography

Chapter 4 Global Sports Medicine Devices Market , By Orthopedic Products

4.1 Introduction

4.1.1 Global Sports Medicine Devices Market, by Orthopedic Products,2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

4.2 Artificial Joint Implants

4.2.1 Global Artificial Joint Implants, Market Revenue, 2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

4.3 Fracture repair

4.3.1 Global Fracture Repair Devices, by Orthopedic Products, Market Revenue, 2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

4.4 Arthroscopy Devices

4.4.1 Global Arthroscopy Devices Market Revenue, 2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

4.5 Prosthesis

4.5.1 Global Prosthesis in Sports Medicines, Market Revenue, 2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

4.6 Orthobiologics

4.6.1 Global Orthobiologics, Market Revenue, 2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

Chapter 5 Global Sports Medicine Devices market , By Recovery& Support Products

5.1 Introduction

5.1.1 Global Sports Medicine Devices Market, by Recovery and Support Products ,2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

5.2 Braces

5.2.1 Global Braces Market in Sports Medicine, Market Revenue, 2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

5.3 Other Recovery Products

5.3.1 Global Other Recovery Products in Sports Medicines, Market Revenue, 2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

5.3.2 Cryotherapy Devices

5.3.2.1 Global Cryotherapy Devices in Sports Medicines, Market Revenue, 2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

5.3.3 Thermotherapy Devices

5.3.3.1 Global Thermotherapy Devices in Sports Medicines, Market Revenue, 2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

5.3.4 Ultrasound Therapy

5.3.4.1 Global Ultrasound Therapy Devices, in Sports Medicines, Market Revenue, 2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

5.3.5 Electrical Stimulation Devices

5.3.5.1 Global Electrical Stimulation Devices in Sports Medicines, Market Revenue, 2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

5.4 Performance Monitoring Devices

5.4.1 Global Performance Monitoring Devices in Sports Medicines, Market Revenue, 2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

5.5 Accessories

5.5.1 Global Accessories, by Recovery and Support Products, Market Revenue, 2011 - 2019 (USD Million)

Chapter 6 Global Sports Medicine Devices Market, by Geography

6.1 Introduction

6.1.1 Global Sports Medicine Devices Market, by Geography, 2011 2019 (USD Million)

6.1.2 Global Sports Medicine Devices Market, by Geography, 2012 and 2019 (USD Million)

6.2 North America

6.2.1 North America Sports Medicine Devices Market, by Geography, 2011 2019 (USD Million)

6.3 Europe

6.3.1 European Sports Medicine Devices, Market revenue, by Geography, 2011 2019 (USD Million)

6.4 Asia Pacific

6.4.1 Asia-Pacific Sports Medicine Devices Market, by Geography, 2011 2019 (USD Million)

6.5 Rest of the World (RoW)

6.5.1 RoW Sports Medicine Devices Market, by Geography, 2011 2019 (USD Million)

Chapter 7 Competitive Landscape

7.1 Market Share Analysis: Global Sports Medicine Devices Market

7.1.1 Methodology

7.1.2 Analysis

7.1.3 Market Share Analysis for the Global Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Devices Market, By Key Players, 2012

7.1.4 Market Share Analysis for the Global Recovery and Support Sports Medicine Devices Market, by key players, 2012

Chapter 8 Recommendations

8.1 Expansion through Mergers, Acquisitions and Joint Ventures

8.2 Investing in Developing Economies may prove to be Profitable in the near Future

8.3 Compression Clothing Market to Witness Faster Growth

Chapter 9 Company Profiles

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Providence Robotic Surgery Institute | Robotic Surgery …

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Providence Robotic Surgery Institute | Robotic Surgery …

CHANGING THE EXPERIENCE OF SURGERY

Providence Healthcare Network is pleased to announce the Providence Robotic Surgery Institute, featuring the latest in advanced robotic surgeries. The da Vinci Si Surgical System allows qualified surgeons to perform complex surgeries through tiny incisions with greater precision, vision and control. This may lead to significantly less pain, shorter hospital stays, faster return to normal daily activities as well as the potential for better clinical outcomes.

With the da Vinci Si Surgical System, surgeons and hospitals are re-writing accepted standards for surgical care. da Vinci is changing the experience of surgery.

The talented surgeons, nurses, surgical technicians and the entire robotic surgery team of TEAMPROVIDENCE have just surpassed the 1,000 mark in surgeries utilizing the technology of the da Vinci Si Surgical System. Robotic surgery typically means tinier incisions, greater precision, and much shorter recovery times. Its the perfect teaming of man and machine.

Dr. Todd Moffatt, MD Surgery partners with the Providence Robotic Surgery Institute, offering robotic surgery, including single-site cholecystectomy. Contact Dr. Todd Moffatt, MD Surgery at 254.230.1234 or visit http://www.tamsurgery.com.

Waco Center for Women's Health partners with the Providence Robotic Surgery Institute, offering gynecological robotic surgery including hysterectomy. Contact Waco Center for Women's Health at 254.772.5454 or visit wacowomenshealth.com.

Waco Surgical Group partners with the Providence Robotic Surgery Institute, offering gynecological robotic surgery including hysterectomy. Contact Waco Surgical Group at 254-776-3188 or visit wacosurgicalgroup.com.

Central Texas Urology partners with the Providence Robotic Surgery Institute offering urological robotic surgery, including prostatectomy. Contact Central Texas Urology at 254-741-6113 or visit centraltexasurology.com.

Surgical Associates, P.A. partners with the Providence Robotic Surgery Institute, offering robotic surgery, including single site cholecystectomy. Contact Surgical Associates, P.A. at 254.752.2587 or email sassociates@hot.rr.com.

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Cincinnati Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Cincinnati Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center

When you experience an injury or have pain, your goal is to seek health care that will return you to a quality lifestyle as soon as possible. You want a physician that is the best in their field one that can diagnose and treat you right the first time. At Cincinnati SportsMedicine and Orthopaedic Center we treat every patient with individual and compassionate care.

For over 35 years we have set the standard of orthopaedic care in Cincinnati.

Make An Appointment

Voted Best Doctors in America. No other Tri-State area physicians have topped the list more times than Cincinnati SportsMedicine & Orthopaedic Center.

Our orthopaedic surgeons use special orthopaedic history forms to assist them in the evaluation, diagnosis and management of your orthopaedic problem.

Advances on the Knee Shoulder & Sports Medicine Annual Course in Hilton Head South Carolina. Follow the above link for more information. Download Course Brochure Here

Keep an eye out for Dr. Galloway and Dr. Busam on thesidelinesas they help the Bengal players.

Sportsmetrics is the first ACL injury prevention and performance program scientifically proven to decrease serious knee ligament injuries in female athletes.

Founded in 1985 by Frank R. Noyes, M.D., the Foundation was established to promote clinical, biomechanical, bioengineering, and neuromuscular research efforts.

I have a functional knee after six surgeries at Cincinnati Sports Medicine to correct severe patella baja and arthrofibrosis! I feel so fortunate to be walking normally again. Thanks!Melissa, Dr. Noyes Patient

Dr. Galloway was great and Im glad he was there to help meNathan, Dr. Galloway Patient

I cannot say enough about the impression you made on us. Its rare having a physician that actually waits on you as opposed to you waiting on them.Lisa, Dr. BusamPatient

Thanks again for all your help, Your rehab staff is excellentLeonard, Physical Therapy Patient

Sports medicine providers, especially those privileged to function as team surgeons, can at times be faced with an

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Intra-articular glenohumeral injections are commonly performed during the non-operative treatment of various should

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Dr Frank R Noyes received the honor of being recognized (Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery) as the Orthopedic Surge

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Congratulations to the Dixie Heights football team for advancing to the Kentucky 6A State Championship game this we

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Cincinnati Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center

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Sports Medicine Research Laboratory | Research …

§ May 7th, 2016 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Sports Medicine Research Laboratory | Research …

The Sports Medicine Research Laboratory, led by principal investigator Dr. Martha M. Murray, focuses on sports medicine injuries, including those of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), knee meniscus and articular cartilage.

In conjunction with our collaborators, we are studying these problems on multiple levels: gene, protein, cell, tissue and organism.

Our research includes projects in:

Dr. Murray also specializes in the clinical care and surgical treatment of patients with knee injuries, including injuries of the ACL, meniscus, and cartilage. If you would like to schedule an appointment to see her, please call 617-355-3501.

Appointment scheduling

The FDA has approved a 20-patient, first-in-human safety trial of bio-enhanced ACL repair. The less invasive alternative to conventional ACL reconstruction uses a bio-engineered sponge as a bridge between the ends of the torn ACL to stimulate healing. Read more about the technique here.

ACL injuries affect the lives of hundreds of thousands of people each year. Treatment is far from perfect, and physicians and patients face challenges such as high failure rates in adolescent athletes and the inability to slow the accelerated progression of arthritis after an ACL rupture, for example.The ACL Handbooktakes a complete view of ACL injuries and treatments, discussing:

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Sports Medicine Research Laboratory | Research ...

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