Page 3«..2345..1020..»

You are currently browsing the Nano Medicine category

Here’s what you need to know about superbugs in the ‘post-antibiotic era’ – National Post

§ November 30th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Here’s what you need to know about superbugs in the ‘post-antibiotic era’ – National Post

By Danielle Edwards

Antibiotics are considered one of the greatest breakthroughs in modern medicine. But in the United States, 35,000 people die a year after succumbing to germs that have evolved the ability to fend off the drugs designed to kill them. Its why two reports from the Centres for Disease Control (CDC) and an expert panel commissioned by the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) have rung the alarm on antibiotic resistance, saying that millions of lives worldwide are at risk. Heres what you need to know about the rise of superbugs and why some experts are calling it the worlds deadliest health crisis.

How are antibiotics made?

Antibiotics are actually created naturally by bacteria to kill off neighbouring predatory organisms in an ecosystem.

In fact, Alexander Fleming made his world-changing discovery of penicillin in 1928 after observing a type of mould had antibiotic properties.

Scientists would go on to harvest soil samples to isolate more germ-killing medicine from microbes that organically evolved defence mechanisms.

Brett Finlay, a microbiology professor at the University of British Columbia, said its a simple process of natural selection.

When you put a selection pressure on any microbe, a small number of them are going to figure out how to avoid it if they can, he said.

Finlay, who sat as the chair for the CCA panel, added that microbes could evolve to reinforce their outer shells. The problem, he said, starts when those resistant microbes start to multiply.

Whats causes antibiotic resistance?

Mass antibiotic use started in earnest during the Second World War, and with large-scale usage came faster resistance rates. Finlay explained that, unlike humans, bacteria can much more effectively swap genetic information.

Once you have a resistance gene, which then resists these antibiotics in the population, it then spreads from microbe to microbe quite easily, he said.

The drugs are now used in several sectors. Though the CCA report stressed there was no one area to blame, it did list factors that have contributed to the weakening of antibiotic treatments.

The CDC estimates doctors prescribe 47 million courses of antibiotics yearly for infections that dont need them in the U.S.

The bulk of antibiotics in Canada 78 per cent are used in the production of livestock, some of them the same drugs used to treat human pathogens, which ups the chances of those germs developing resistance, as well.

Whats the worst-case scenario?

Both the reports warn of the wide-reaching effects of antibiotic resistance, like lower food production, increased hospital costs and the onset of millions of infections with no way to treat them.

Stop referring to a coming post-antibiotic era its already here, CDC Director Robert Redfield said in a letter accompanying the organizations report. You and I are living in a time when some miracle drugs no longer perform miracles and families are being ripped apart by a microscopic enemy.

Bacteria that cause illnesses like urinary tract infections and gonorrhea are some of the microbes researchers are most concerned about, especially since its becoming nearly impossible to develop new antibiotics, Finlay said.

Financial and scientific obstacles meant that no new major classes of antibiotics were approved to treat infections between 1962 and 2000.

In 2018, 26 per cent of diagnosed infections in Canada required further treatment and that number could jump to 40 per cent by 2050.

While the CDC said the number of infection-related deaths has decreased since it released a 2013 report on the resistance phenomenon, more than 2.8 million antibiotic-resistant infections are diagnosed in the U.S. every year.

There could be an enormous economic cost, as well. The CCA report projected the phenomenon could reduce Canadas GDP by up to $21 billion per year and rack up $8 billion in healthcare costs over the next thirty years.

Mitigation efforts?

Fighting antibiotics with antibiotics isnt the answer, the reports note. But they both say infection prevention, which includes good old handwashing, is one of the best ways to cut down on antibiotic use. Fewer infections means less need to prescribe the germ-killing drugs.

And medical innovations, like phage therapy which uses viruses to kill bacteria, could mean the end of our dependence on antibiotics.

Finlay said one of the biggest ways to slow the increase in resistance is stewardship making sure antibiotics are only used when theyre absolutely necessary.

You dont need antibiotic-containing detergents (that) youre using on your countertops to clean them. You dont have to use hand sanitizer every time you go out the door, he said.

Its not all bad news. There have been government efforts to lower antibiotic use (Health Canada announced last year the drugs could only be used for livestock with a valid prescription), but Finlay said it will take combined efforts from the healthcare sector and governments to take on the threat.

Its going to affect everyone, no one is immune from this, said Finlay. Whatever station in life you are, you get infections, and you need antibiotics. And if theyre not there, you suffer.

Original post:
Here's what you need to know about superbugs in the 'post-antibiotic era' - National Post

Read the Rest...

The shocking history of electric fish – News – The Times – Apalachicola Times

§ November 30th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on The shocking history of electric fish – News – The Times – Apalachicola Times

Lon Wilkens, a retired professor of neuroscience who lives on St. George Island, explores the history of a fascinating aspect of nature

Many of us are aware of the lesser electric ray, Narcine brasiliensis, some perhaps too familiar considering the nearly 35-volt jolt it can deliver if touched. Less common locally is the related Atlantic torpedo, Torpedo nobiliana.

We intuitively understand the physical basis of an electric shock, with our lives dependent on an electrical infrastructure. Nevertheless, it is fascinating to reflect back in history, imagine how an electrical shock from a fish was viewed when all of nature was interpreted on the basis of four elements, air, earth, fire, and water. In contrast, electricity is a phenomenon of relatively recent history, popularized beginning in the 18th century by Benjamin Franklin flying his kite in a thunderstorm.

First, it is instructive to review the diversity of electric fish. Mostly, we think of electrogenic fish that produce an electric organ discharge (EOD). Then there are fish that are electrosensory, a sense we do not possess. Many fish are both electrosensory and generate EODs.

Fish can be strongly or weakly electrogenic. The former includes skates and rays, (the genus Torpedo contains 10 species, some generating EODs up to 220 volts), stargazers (to 50 volts), and the electric Nile catfish Malapterus electricus (to 350 volts). Most familiar is the South American electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, with EODs of up to 700 volts, jolts known to stun and disable a horse.

In contrast, weakly electric fish generate EODs around 1 volt, several hundred species in all including many common in the aquarium trade such as elephantnose and knifefishes. These fish are also electrosensory and communicate with each other electrically. Moreover, by monitoring objects that distort their own electric fields they can electrolocate, analogous to sonic location used by bats and porpoises, active mechanisms especially useful in the dark.

Other electrosensory fish are passive (no EODs), detecting the electrical fields of both animate and inanimate objects as weak as 1 nanovolt (10-9 V) per centimeter. To illustrate this extraordinary sensitivity consider that a shark can detect a flounder buried in the sand, and can navigate, monitoring its own electric field as it swims, its body acting as a conductor moving through the earths magnetic field, the biological equivalent of an electricity generator. The passive electrosense is a primitive feature found in lampreys, all elasmobranchs (sharks, skates and rays), sturgeon and paddlefish. Essentially an aquatic sensory mechanism, the duckbill platypus, a mammal, has developed a parallel electrosense used to detect prey..

Origins are with Mediterranean torpedoes

The shocking history origins deal primarily with torpedoes abundant in Mediterranean waters and brought to the attention of scholars, physicians and philosophers during the classical Greco-Roman era. The earliest reference to torpedoes was in Hippocratic writings in the 5th century B.C. Plato and Socrates (4th century B.C.) alluded to their powers as magic, benumbing the mind, whereby the flat sea torpedo torpifies those who come into contact. The Greeks referred to the effect as nrk, from which narcotic, narcosis, narcotize were derived based on the fishs ability to cause numbness, torpor, and involuntary muscle twitches.

Aristotle (374-322 B.C.), writing in his Historia Animalium, noted its specialized numbing as a purposeful intelligence that it used to capture prey. He was supplied specimens by local fishermen and by Alexander the Great. These fishermen reported that the mysterious force of the torpedo could be felt even at a distance when touched holding a metal rod (trident) or the salty lines of a fishing net.

Pliny the Elder (1st century A.D.), the great Roman naturalist, wrote in his 37 volume Naturalis Historia that if only touched with the end of a spear or staff, this fish has the property of benumbing even the most vigorous arm and of riveting the feet of the runner. He interpreted the shock as an odor of emanation from the fish, a poison that could run up a spear and kill a man, even a horse, a mixture of science and fable.

Greco-Roman medical literature included many therapeutic uses for the torpedo discharge, of course without any idea of the force electricity. Among some 271 remedies ascribed to Scribonius (3 B.C.-54 A.D.) were treatments using torpedoes for headaches to gout. The latter, foot pain or podagra, was common among Roman aristocrats given their rich diets and lead poisoning from wine containers. The foot placed on a live torpedo on the moist shore relieved gout pain up to the knee. Headache relief involved placing a live torpedo on the spot of the pain but required subsequent removal lest ability to feel be taken away. This numbing effect is not so far-fetched knowing now that electrical stimulation is used clinically to relieve pain and thought to release endorphins.

In addition to relief of headache pain, Discorides (1st century A.D.) used torpedoes to treat a condition of the seat, now interpreted to mean application to the prolapsed seat (prolapsus ani in Latin), that is, hemorrhoids. This form of electrotherapy is potentially valid given that electrical stimulation can cause constriction of blood vessels and hemorrhoidal shrinkage.

Galen (129-200 A.D.), the most accomplished physician and philosopher in Roman antiquity, also tested the shock of the torpedo, finding it useful in treating headaches. In describing its analgesic remedy, he likened the effect to a cold venom, some form of corpuscular matter. He equated hand numbness transmitted through the trident to the lodestone (a magnet) effect in which a body can acquire the power of a separate object.

The immobilizing actions of the torpedo also captured the imagination of ancient poets who suggested that catching a torpedo can make an angler remorseful. Oppian (2nd century A.D.), writes poetically that the Cramp-fish (torpedo) paint their magick wands, where icy torch the strongest fin commands one touch of hers dams up the vital Flood, Contracts the Nerves, and clots the stagnate Blood. Torpedoes also appeared prominently in Mediterranean paintings and pottery.

Authors from classical antiquity significantly influenced how torpedoes, along with the Nile catfish, were perceived well into the Middle Ages, a period during which Christianity and Islam emerged along with a decline in the spirit of scientific investigation, the Dark Ages. Physicians still used torpedoes for head pain and podagra as specified in medical texts. Byzantine writings concerning nrk were essentially compilations from the previous classical era and associated the magical powers with various occult practices.

Well into the Renaissance, despite advances in architecture, medicine, and science, there was no further insight into the nature of the discharge. By the 16th century, European exploration and conquest had generated considerable interest in the torporific (electric) eel that horrified natives along the Orinoco River in South America. Still, the only explanation available was that the torpedo discharge was mechanical, associated with violent contractions in the fish.

The discharge itself was interpreted at the time according to atomistic theories of sensation attributed largely to Galileo, whereby microscopic pores, canals and glands produced minute corpuscles (atoms) used to explain multiple physiological processes including perspiration. This was incorporated in Stefano Lorenzinis (1678) corpuscular theory attributing numbness to corpuscles (molti corpuscoli) that entered the hand to block nerves as a result of touching the fish. The mechanical theory was later discredited since contractions by the torpedo proved to be invisible, unrepeatable, and any movements were no doubt affected by the tremor induced in the experimenters hand in response to the shock.

Electricity as a physical entity became established in mid-17th century Europe, confirmed scientifically by the 18th using instruments such as the Leyden jar, a capacitor that was introduced into the publics imagination by Abbe Jean-Antoine Nollet (1700-1770), in a demonstration before royal onlookers in Versailles that 180 hand-holding grenadiers who completed the circuit leaped in unison at its discharge.

These instruments were capable of producing sparks, akin to static electricity we can generate by stroking fur or amber, and were seemingly related to the demonstration of atmospheric electricity by Benjamin Franklin. Self-educated, Franklin abandoned his lucrative printing business in 1748 to study electricity and later moved to England in 1757 to join the Royal Society of London, where he contributed prominently to developments in fish electricity. He also is credited with the concept of polarity, based on his theory that lightning is charged differently between clouds (negative) and land (positive), and concluding that natural and man-made electricity are the same.

As interest in electricity grew in the 18th century, it led to numerous attempts, including by Franklin, to use electrotherapy to treat palsies, hysteria, and other paralyzing illnesses. Still, despite the ancient history of torpedo therapeutics, no scientific understanding of animal electricity was yet available. Although nerves were envisioned as conduits to the brain as early as the 4th century B.C., conveyance (conduction) along the nerve was still attributed variously to ethereal spirits, fluids, or mechanical vibrations.

Benjamin Franklin helps with experiments

As interest in animal electricity continued to grow, electric fish contributed significantly to the eventual electrical basis of physiological function in both nerve and muscle. A major contribution from the Dutch, with settlements in Guiana, S.A., came from awareness of the more powerful electric eel whose discharge was equated with that of the Leyden jar, both capable of knocking a person to the ground. The only difference was that neither spark (eq., lightning) nor weak crackling sound (eq., thunder) could be elicited from the eel, facts that contributed to remaining resistance to the idea of fish electricity.

An American physician who worked briefly in Guiana (Edward Bancroft, 1744-1821) presented evidence that shocks from the torporific eel traveled up the fishing line and could be felt by several people holding hands (in series). John Walsh (1726-1795), a wealthy English colonel with an interest in natural history provided singular evidence for the electrical nature of Torpedo.

Armed with a series of experiments outlined by his collaborator, Benjamin Franklin, Walsh traveled to La Rochelle and nearby lIsle de R on the French Atlantic coast where the rays were abundant. Using public demonstrations he showed that the discharge could be felt 40 feet away when connected to the fish by a wire, that up to eight persons holding hands in series were affected, and that two persons, one touching the upper surface of the fish, the other the lower surface, only felt the shock when they completed the circuit by holding hands. In letters back to Franklin, Walsh concluded that the effect is certainly torpedinal electricity.

His work was forwarded to Henry Cavendish (1731-1810), the brilliant chemist (discoverer of oxygen), physicist and member of the Royal Society (along with Walsh, Franklin, Bancroft and other notables), who provided quantitative explanations supporting fish electricity. Franklin returned to the United States in 1775 in fear of arrest as a spy as progression toward the American Revolution became obvious. Ironically, it was August 1, 1776, when Walsh finally succeeded in demonstrating the convincing spark from a fish discharge, made possible by the arrival of a live electric eel from Guiana whose discharge was 10 times greater than the torpedo.

The torpedo and electric eel were important in the realization that animals function electrically. As such they had great influence on two Italian physician scientists, Luigi Galvani (1773-1798) and Alessandro Volta (1745-1827). Galvanis experiments led him to propose that electricity was inherent in the tissues of the nerve by demonstrating that frog leg muscles twitched when the [motor] nerve was stimulated with a weak electrical current. One such experiment used long wires connected to an electrical device in the room. This is known to have inspired Mary Shelley to create Frankenstein in her 1817 saga by attracting the electrical activity from a lightning storm.

Volta claimed that the electricity was not intrinsic to the nerve but rather originated in the metals Galvani used to touch the nerve. His own experiments with the frog used a pile or battery that he is credited with inventing. This first battery, dissimilar metals sandwiched around moistened cardboard, was inspired in turn by the electric organ of the torpedo. From these signature experiments, preceded by work through the ages, it is clear that torporific fishes have played a major role in shaping civilization through the life sciences and medicine.

Lon Wilkens, an emeritus professor of neuroscience at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, lives on St. George Island.

See the original post here:
The shocking history of electric fish - News - The Times - Apalachicola Times

Read the Rest...

Here’s what you need to know about superbugs in the ‘post-antibiotic era’ – Calgary Herald

§ November 29th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Here’s what you need to know about superbugs in the ‘post-antibiotic era’ – Calgary Herald

By Danielle Edwards

Antibiotics are considered one of the greatest breakthroughs in modern medicine. But in the United States, 35,000 people die a year after succumbing to germs that have evolved the ability to fend off the drugs designed to kill them. Its why two reports from the Centres for Disease Control (CDC) and an expert panel commissioned by the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) have rung the alarm on antibiotic resistance, saying that millions of lives worldwide are at risk. Heres what you need to know about the rise of superbugs and why some experts are calling it the worlds deadliest health crisis.

How are antibiotics made?

Antibiotics are actually created naturally by bacteria to kill off neighbouring predatory organisms in an ecosystem.

In fact, Alexander Fleming made his world-changing discovery of penicillin in 1928 after observing a type of mould had antibiotic properties.

Scientists would go on to harvest soil samples to isolate more germ-killing medicine from microbes that organically evolved defence mechanisms.

Brett Finlay, a microbiology professor at the University of British Columbia, said its a simple process of natural selection.

When you put a selection pressure on any microbe, a small number of them are going to figure out how to avoid it if they can, he said.

Finlay, who sat as the chair for the CCA panel, added that microbes could evolve to reinforce their outer shells. The problem, he said, starts when those resistant microbes start to multiply.

Whats causes antibiotic resistance?

Mass antibiotic use started in earnest during the Second World War, and with large-scale usage came faster resistance rates. Finlay explained that, unlike humans, bacteria can much more effectively swap genetic information.

Once you have a resistance gene, which then resists these antibiotics in the population, it then spreads from microbe to microbe quite easily, he said.

The drugs are now used in several sectors. Though the CCA report stressed there was no one area to blame, it did list factors that have contributed to the weakening of antibiotic treatments.

The CDC estimates doctors prescribe 47 million courses of antibiotics yearly for infections that dont need them in the U.S.

The bulk of antibiotics in Canada 78 per cent are used in the production of livestock, some of them the same drugs used to treat human pathogens, which ups the chances of those germs developing resistance, as well.

Whats the worst-case scenario?

Both the reports warn of the wide-reaching effects of antibiotic resistance, like lower food production, increased hospital costs and the onset of millions of infections with no way to treat them.

Stop referring to a coming post-antibiotic era its already here, CDC Director Robert Redfield said in a letter accompanying the organizations report. You and I are living in a time when some miracle drugs no longer perform miracles and families are being ripped apart by a microscopic enemy.

Bacteria that cause illnesses like urinary tract infections and gonorrhea are some of the microbes researchers are most concerned about, especially since its becoming nearly impossible to develop new antibiotics, Finlay said.

Financial and scientific obstacles meant that no new major classes of antibiotics were approved to treat infections between 1962 and 2000.

In 2018, 26 per cent of diagnosed infections in Canada required further treatment and that number could jump to 40 per cent by 2050.

While the CDC said the number of infection-related deaths has decreased since it released a 2013 report on the resistance phenomenon, more than 2.8 million antibiotic-resistant infections are diagnosed in the U.S. every year.

There could be an enormous economic cost, as well. The CCA report projected the phenomenon could reduce Canadas GDP by up to $21 billion per year and rack up $8 billion in healthcare costs over the next thirty years.

Mitigation efforts?

Fighting antibiotics with antibiotics isnt the answer, the reports note. But they both say infection prevention, which includes good old handwashing, is one of the best ways to cut down on antibiotic use. Fewer infections means less need to prescribe the germ-killing drugs.

And medical innovations, like phage therapy which uses viruses to kill bacteria, could mean the end of our dependence on antibiotics.

Finlay said one of the biggest ways to slow the increase in resistance is stewardship making sure antibiotics are only used when theyre absolutely necessary.

You dont need antibiotic-containing detergents (that) youre using on your countertops to clean them. You dont have to use hand sanitizer every time you go out the door, he said.

Its not all bad news. There have been government efforts to lower antibiotic use (Health Canada announced last year the drugs could only be used for livestock with a valid prescription), but Finlay said it will take combined efforts from the healthcare sector and governments to take on the threat.

Its going to affect everyone, no one is immune from this, said Finlay. Whatever station in life you are, you get infections, and you need antibiotics. And if theyre not there, you suffer.

Go here to see the original:
Here's what you need to know about superbugs in the 'post-antibiotic era' - Calgary Herald

Read the Rest...

New Discovery Can Help You Get Better Immunity and Life Longer – Gilmore Health News

§ November 29th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on New Discovery Can Help You Get Better Immunity and Life Longer – Gilmore Health News

Skin of microscopic worm might be the solution for better health and longevity. Researchers at Washington State Universitys Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine published in Science Advances that a transparent nematode, normally found in soil, called Caenorhabditis elegans, can help human beings live a healthier and longer life. They found out that the skin-like exterior barrier of the worms cuticle can be controlled by the nervous system in cases of bacterial infections.

Read Also: Is NAD+ The Anti Aging Substance Mankind Has Been Searching For?

Caenorhabditis elegans

Although C. elegans is normally used as a model organism in most biological research due to its relatively simple structure, a number of genetic similarities of this organism are linked to more complex organisms, including human beings. This is an implication that the findings of the study could have the same benefit on human health.

According to one of the authors of the paper, Assistant Professor Jingru Sun, their study challenges the usual view about the response of infection to a physical barrier such as a humans skin or a worms cuticle and also the innate defense of the body against a pathogen. The researchers revealed that the nematode has the capacity to change its cuticle structure in times of infection, and the nervous system controls the defense response of the body.

The researchers utilized technologies, including CRISPR gene editing and gene silencing, to portray that collagens are regulated by a G-protein-coupled receptor together with NPR-8.

It was further shown that if NPR-8 receptor is removed from nematodes, they have longer survival periods, especially with exposure to pathogens causing salmonella, pneumonia, and staph infections. On the other hand, the nematodes cuticle remains smooth despite the response to the pathogens.

Read Also: Anti-Aging Discovery Could Revolutionize Anti Wrinkles Treatments

Nematodes need to have a healthy cuticle that protects them from external insults. Furthermore,wicked proteins are being produced by most pathogens, which are usually the cause of the destruction of the barrier, thereby resulting in infection. The study showed that the attacks could be detected by the nervous system, and it responds to the threat by strengthening or remodeling the protective structure.

Althoughcollagens are considered as the most abundant proteins in mammals, aging can cause them to decline. On the other hand, a decrease in collagen levels in human beings is linked to more health-related problems, including wrinkles. Nematodes have only one cuticle, while human beings have many; in fact, it can be found on every organ. It can be harmful if the cuticle is too loose or too stiff.

Read Also: HGH and Its Anti Aging Effects On The Skin

The study is an indication that collagens are very crucial, especially in its role of defending against pathogenic infections. Researchers concluded that if collagens are regulated, they might contribute to longevity. They further aim to understand the response mechanisms in their next study.

Is The Cancer Drug Dasatinib The Anti-Aging Breakthrough We Have All Been Waiting For?

NAD Plus An Anti-Aging Supplement Could Play A Big Role in The Treatment of Cancer

HGH Supplements Worth Considering For Your Anti Aging Needs

The Rapidly Booming Anti Aging Industry Exposed

Read more from the original source:
New Discovery Can Help You Get Better Immunity and Life Longer - Gilmore Health News

Read the Rest...

This Japanese reality show on Netflix, where the cast avoid artificial drama and fall in love at their own pace, is the exact opposite of Love Island…

§ November 29th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on This Japanese reality show on Netflix, where the cast avoid artificial drama and fall in love at their own pace, is the exact opposite of Love Island…

captionTerrace House takes place in a beautiful Tokyo apartment.sourceNetflix

The concept for Terrace House is simple. Six young, attractive men and women move into a beautiful house in Tokyo.

They swim in the pool, cook dinner in the absurdly minimalist kitchen and drive the complimentary sports car. But this is where the similarities to shows like Love Island and The Bachelor end.

The unspoken assumption is that were waiting for these beautiful people to pair up but there are no confessional diary rooms, no staged contests, no audience votes.

Terrace House is a perfect, uninterrupted bubble of low-key dates, cooking and rooftop chats. Theres nothing to hurry them along either because nobody on this show is competing for a final rose or cash prize.

Terrace House runs for at least a year, airing every week in Japan and dropping in 12 episode blocks on Netflix.

The residents can stay as long as they wish. When somebody quietly leaves, a new housemate arrives.

If someone doesnt find love, thats cool. Beyond dates, the cast share hobbies, career advice and a ton of food.

Most conversations happen around the dinner table, at a trendy Tokyo bar, or in a cute caf. Its a microcosm of the reality of being a twenty-something in a big city, finding love and growing into adulthood.

If you want something to binge-watch thats relatable and relaxing, this show is perfect.

The residents of Terrace House are free to come and go as they please which is pretty integral, as they all have jobs to do.

Unlike the cookie-cutter Love Island cast of Instagram models, the current residents of Terrace House have a variety of professions.

Among the girls, Kaori Watanabe (28) is an illustrator, Haruka Okuyama (24) is an actress who spends her spare time competing in drag races, while Risako Tanabe (20) works as a fitness instructor. As for the guys, Kenny Yoshihara (31) fronts indie band Spicysol, Shohei Matsuzaki (25) is an actor, travel writer, and part-time decorator, and Ruka Nishinoiri (20) works as a shop assistant while dreaming of becoming a Marvel star.

While we wait for them to pair up, a panel of six commentators all established actors and comedians in Japan watch the show alongside the audience. They appear every 15 minutes to give their expert commentary on every microscopic detail of the casts interaction which is necessary because its the little moments Terrace House makes big.

Whether its Kenny teaching Haruka to play guitar, Risako bringing Ruka medicine when he gets ill or Shohei and Kaori discussing their views on starting a family, the commentators pop up with perfect timing to gush and gossip alongside viewers.

Theres an underlying expectation that the Terrace House cast is here for a genuine opportunity to meet someone new. Nobody is on the show to cash out with a brand sponsorship and the panel of commentators delight in calling out singer Kenny for over-promoting his band Spicysol by wearing his own merch.

Meanwhile, Kaori is shown in tears after realizing a recent art commission may have been more due to her exposure than her talent.

The Terrace House residents are probably the politest reality TV cast on television. Any drama is downplayed or downright avoided.

Case in point: episode two is titled The Tempura Incident in reference to an argument between Haruka and Shohei.

The fight itself is pretty anticlimactic. Shohei asserts his aim to explore a variety of career options, while Haruka suggests this might possibly appear flaky. Instead of taking offence, Shohei brushes it off with a wise food analogy: I love tempura, but it wouldnt taste good if I had it every day.

This is the kind of conversation barely worth commenting on, but in the world of Terrace House, it anchors an entire episode. It kick-starts a debate between the commentators on the merits of both perspectives.

Shohei is marked out for his laidback attitude, a trait that comes to define his character throughout the series, whether hes casually announcing his decision to star in a soft porn film or dismissing a later love triangle as a first-world problem.

Romantic tension stays at a constant simmer. The cast dance around each other, but instead of inducing boredom, it keeps viewers hooked.

You cant leave the room for a snack or get distracted by your phone not when theres a chance you might miss the moment when a tipsy Risako asks Ruka to be her boyfriend but he mishears her.

Or when Kaori refuses to let Ruka pay for dinner, and, in doing so, breaks the boys heart. Its so innocent it might seem unrealistic, but what the show lacks in PDA it makes up for in sincerity.

Love Island is the Tinder of reality TV, but Terrace House takes the subtle, slow elements of courtship that have vanished with the rise of social media and puts them front and center. If the casts shyness seems antiquated, it only adds to the shows charm.

Terrace House is the ultimate reality show. Viewers watch relationships develop over weeks in real-time. The cast is decent to each other. They continue with their day-to-day lives. The camera pans slowly around the gorgeous house and lingers on the meals they share. It might seem mundane, but that gentle vibe is what defines this sleeper hit.

In an industry that thrives on drama, Terrace House proves that truth is stronger than fiction.

Read more:

Camila Cabello blamed paparazzi for her public displays of affection with Shawn Mendes: Might as well just make out on Instagram

James Van Der Beek posted dramatic body transformation pictures showing how dancing has changed his physique

The 20 most-watched shows on Netflix in 2019, so far

Read the original post:
This Japanese reality show on Netflix, where the cast avoid artificial drama and fall in love at their own pace, is the exact opposite of Love Island...

Read the Rest...

Stem cells do help restore heart function but in a different way – News-Medical.net

§ November 29th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Stem cells do help restore heart function but in a different way – News-Medical.net

A new study published in the journal Nature shows that stem cells do work well to repair the damaged heart but in an entirely different manner than was originally supposed. The study shows that stem cells, whether living or dead, when injected into the area of damage in the heart in mice, activate an intense acute inflammation. This triggers the classic wound healing response which finally results in the partial or complete recovery of mechanical function of the injured area.

Stem cells are a hot new area of intensive research in almost every field of medical science. These cells are characterized by their property of self-renewal and ability to differentiate into many different types of cells. They have long been thought to stimulate tissue repair and regeneration by differentiating into the native tissue cells that were injured in the given organ or tissue.

In this microscopic histology image, macrophage immune cells (shown in red and green) flock to the injured region of a damaged mouse heart three days after researchers injected adult heart stem cells within the yellow dotted area. Researchers report Nov. 27 in Nature that stem cell therapy helps hearts recover from heart attack by triggering an innate immune response that alters cell activity around the injured area so that it heals with a more optimized scar and improved contractile properties.

Stem cells cause inflammation which is due to macrophage activation. Macrophages are the early warning system of the immune response. They tell the body when stem cells are seen where they are normally absent, in this case. The resulting inflammation causes secondary wound healing that ends in a slight improvement in heart function after a heart attack. The CCR2+ and CX3CR1+ macrophages cause acute inflammation.

The macrophages, along with other nonspecific immune cells, are part of the innate immune response which is the first to react to an antigen or invader. Once this response sets in, the cells around the injured area begin to show a new pattern and level of activity. This eventually causes the scar that is forming to become healthier, resulting in better contractility of the heart tissue in the damaged part.

Earlier research in 2014 by the same team, published in the same journal, provided the basis for the current study. In the prior study, the scientists injected c-kit positive stem cells into the damaged heart. They expected that these cells would replace cardiomyocytes but it did not happen. This made the researchers ask how actually stem cell therapy worked. To answer this question, they designed a new way of looking at stem cells used as treatment.

They used 2 commonly used types of heart stem cells, namely, mononuclear cells from the bone marrow and cardiac progenitor cells. They looked at the data they had on these cells, testing it and revalidating it, under several different conditions. They were surprised to see that the heart grew stronger if either of the two stem cells were injected, but also if dead stem cells or an inert chemical called zymosan was injected. Zymosan is chemically inert but can provoke innate immunity.

The researchers found that whatever injection was used, the acute sterile immune response that set in caused a difference in the formation of the connective tissue that makes up the extracellular matrix, an important component of the extracellular environment. As a result, the border zone extracellular matrix is reduced. In addition, this inflammation also improved the scars mechanical strength. Cardiac fibroblasts became more active. This was observed because injected hearts produced a significantly greater change in passive force over increasing stretch, a profile that was more like uninjured hearts.

To achieve this healing the chemical or stem cells must be injected straight into the heart, right around the damaged area. In most cases of previous stem cell research for ischemic heart damage, the injections have been into the circulation, citing patient safety. This could be the reason why so many trials have shown inconsistent results they were badly designed. Researcher Jeffery Molkentin sums it up: Our results show that the injected material has to go directly into the heart tissue flanking the infarct region. This is where the healing is occurring and where the macrophages can work their magic.

And in the case of zymosan, they were interested to note that the beneficial effect produced by injecting this chemical into the damaged area was a little greater and lasted a little longer than when stem cells (dead or alive) were used.

The researchers say, The implications of our study are very straight forward and present important new evidence about an unsettled debate in the field of cardiovascular medicine. They plan to find new and better ways to harness this healing potential of these stem cells and molecules, or even the macrophages themselves. For instance, looking at the intense inflammation triggered by the injection of any of the three agents, the team would like to test the possibility of polarizing macrophages, or forming a biological queue of macrophages that will be able only to heal thus exploiting the healing resources of this immune cell type.

If they succeed, it could change the way heart disease is treated in the future.

Journal reference:

Vagnozzi, R.J., Maillet, M., Sargent, M.A. et al. An acute immune response underlies the benefit of cardiac stem-cell therapy. Nature (2019) doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1802-2, https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1802-2

Original post:
Stem cells do help restore heart function but in a different way - News-Medical.net

Read the Rest...

UpNano: Forging Ahead in Microfabrication With Two-Photon Polymerization – 3DPrint.com

§ November 29th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on UpNano: Forging Ahead in Microfabrication With Two-Photon Polymerization – 3DPrint.com

Cell biology has very particular characteristics. During the last decade, researchers and scientists have astounded us with their discoveries in bioprinting and regenerative medicine, proving that a great deal of what happens at the lab is basically knowing and understanding cells. These microscopic structures are the foundation of most projects where cells are patterned to grow into mature tissues, interacting with other cells and non-cellular components of their local environment, such as the extracellular matrix and nutrient sources. But there have been a few challenges along the way, basically: how to keep the cells alive, what materials to use for cells to live in, and keeping up with the requirements of micro parts in the production sector as well as in academic and industrial research. And that is a big part of bioprinting. Tissue growth and the behavior of cells can be controlled and investigated particularly well by embedding the cells in a delicate 3D framework, yet some methods are very imprecise or only allow a very short time window in which the cells can be processed without being damaged. Moreover, the materials used must be cell-friendly during and after the process, restricting the variety of possible materials, which includes biocompatible synthetic and natural polymers. Now a new high-resolution bioprinting process developed at Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), in Austria, ensures living cells can be integrated into fine structures created in a 3D printer extremely fast.

Thanks to a special bioink and 3D printing system, cells can be embedded in a 3D matrix printed with micrometer precision, at a printing speed of one meter per second. This high-resolution bioprinting process with completely new materials allows the fabrication of structures and surface textures mimicking the microenvironment of cells.

The behavior of a cell depends crucially on the mechanical, chemical and geometric properties of its environment, said Aleksandr Ovsianikov, head of the 3D Printing and Biofabrication research group at the Institute of Materials Science and Technology at TU Wien. The structures in which the cells are embedded must be permeable to nutrients so that the cells can survive and multiply. But it is also important whether the structures are stiff or flexible and whether they are stable or degrade over time.

The high-resolution 3D printing technology and the materials are being commercialized by UpNano GmbH, a spin-off company of TU Wien. The ultrafast high-resolution 3D printing system called NanoOne is based on multiphoton lithography and combines the precision of two-photon polymerization. UpNano claims that their patented process enables the batch production of microparts with the highest resolution and complexity in the market, enabling the economic production of polymer parts from micro to mesoscale. The biocompatible process in combination with optimized materials facilitates cell, tissue, and biofabrication. Meaning that the living cells of choice can be mixed into the material and printed directly or seeded on sterile, pre-fabricated scaffold structures.

NanoOne 3D printing system

In order to achieve an extremely high resolution, two-photon polymerization methods have been used at TU Wien for years. This method uses a chemical reaction that is only initiated when a molecule of the material simultaneously absorbs two photons of the laser beam. According to the institute, this is only possible where the laser beam has a particularly high intensity. At these points, the substance hardens, while it remains liquid everywhere else. Therefore, this two-photon method is best suited to produce extremely fine structures with high precision.

However, these high-resolution techniques usually have the disadvantage of being very slowoften in the range of micrometers or a few millimeters per second. At TU Wien, however, cell-friendly materials can be processed at a speed of more than one meter per second, and they claim that only if the entire process can be completed within a few hours there is a good chance of the cells surviving and developing further.

Aleksandr Ovsianikov

According to Ovsianikov, printing microscopically fine 3D objects is no longer a problem today, however, the use of living cells presents science with completely new challenges: until now, there has simply been a lack of suitable chemical substances. You need liquids or gels that solidify precisely where you illuminate them with a focused laser beam. However, these materials must not be harmful to the cells, and the whole process has to happen extremely quickly.

UpNanos high-performance two-photon materials are engineered and optimized to utilize the full potential of the NanoOne printing system. In addition to UpBio, the hydrogel material for biological applications and bioprinting, UpNano offers photopolymers (UpPhoto) and sol-gel hybrid materials (UpSol). Living cells of choice can be mixed into the material and printed directly, and cells embedded in an UpBio matrix can be used for 3D in vitro cell tests, which gain increasing importance in cell culture, tissue regeneration and pharmaceutical research.

Our method provides many possibilities to adapt to the environment of the cells. Depending on how the structure is built, it can be made stiffer or softer. Even fine, continuous gradients are possible. In this way, we can define exactly how the structure should look in order to allow the desired kind of cell growth and cell migration. The laser intensity can also be used to determine how easily the structure will be degraded over time.

Ovsianikov is convinced that this is an important step forward for cell research: Using these 3D scaffolds, it is possible to investigate the behavior of cells with previously unattainable accuracy. It is possible to study the spread of diseases, and if stem cells are used, it is even possible to produce tailor-made tissue in this way.

The research project is an international and interdisciplinary cooperation in which three different institutes of the TU Vienna were involved: Ovsianikovs research group was responsible for the printing technology itself, the Institute of Applied Synthetic Chemistry at TU Wien developed fast and cell-friendly photoinitiators (the substances that initiate the hardening process when illuminated) and TU Wiens Institute of Lightweight Structures and Structural Biomechanics analyzed the mechanical properties of the printed structures.

The advantages of the NanoOne high-resolution printing system enable the additive manufacturing of polymeric microparts in research, science, and industry, with achievable part sizes, ranging from micro to mesoscale, with structure details in a submicrometer range and throughput of the system that opens up a universe of application possibilities. Considering that UpNano is a very new company, founded in 2018, we can expect researchers to come up with some very interesting solutions in a universe of applications.

See more here:
UpNano: Forging Ahead in Microfabrication With Two-Photon Polymerization - 3DPrint.com

Read the Rest...

Design and Synthesis of Gold-Gadolinium-Core-Shell Nanoparticles as Co | IJN – Dove Medical Press

§ November 29th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Design and Synthesis of Gold-Gadolinium-Core-Shell Nanoparticles as Co | IJN – Dove Medical Press

Fatima Aouidat,1 Sarah Boumati,2 Memona Khan,1 Frederik Tielens,3 Bich-Thuy Doan,2 Jolanda Spadavecchia1

1CNRS, UMR 7244, CSPBAT, Laboratory of Chemistry, Structures and Properties of Biomaterials And Therapeutic Agents University Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cit, Bobigny, France; 2UTCBS Chimie ParisTech University Paris Descartes - CNRS UMR 8258 INSERM U1022 Equipe Synthesis, Electrochemistry, Imaging and Analytical Systems for Diagnostics SEISAD, Paris, France; 3General Chemistry (ALGC), Vrije University of Brussel (Free University Brussels-VUB), Brussel, Belgium

Correspondence: Jolanda Spadavecchia Email jolanda.spadavecchia@univ-paris13.fr

Introduction: The development of biopolymers for the synthesis of Gd(III) nanoparticles, as therapeutics, could play a key role in nanomedicine. Biocompatible polymers are not only used for complex monovalent biomolecules, but also for the realization of multivalent active targeting materials as diagnostic and/or therapeutic hybrid nanoparticles. In this article, it was reported for the first time, a novel synthesis of Gd(III)biopolymerAu(III) complex, acting as a key ingredient of core-shell gold nanoparticles (Gd(@AuNPs).Material and methods: The physical and chemical evaluation was carried out by spectroscopic analytical techniques (Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible and TEM). The theoretical characterization by DFT (density functional theory) analysis was carried out under specific conditions to investigate the interaction between the Au and the Gd precursors, during the first nucleation step. Magnetic features with relaxivity measurements at 7T were also performed as well as cytotoxicity studies on hepatocyte cell lines for biocompatibility studies. The in vivo detailed dynamic biodistribution studies in mice to characterize the potential applications for biology as MRI contrast agents were then achieved.Results: Physicalchemical evaluation confirms the successful design and reaction supposed. Viabilities of TIB-75 (hepatocytes) cells were evaluated using Alamar blue cytotoxic tests with increasing concentrations of nanoparticles. In vivo biodistribution studies were then accomplished to assess the kinetic behavior of the nanoparticles in mice and characterize their stealthiness property after intravenous injection.Conclusion: We demonstrated that Gd@AuNPs have some advantages to display hepatocytes in the liver. Particularly, these nanoconjugates give a good cellular uptake of several quantities of Gd@NPs into cells, while preserving a T1 contrast inside cells that provide a robust in vivo detection using T1-weighted MR images. These results will strengthen the role of gadolinium as complex to gold in order to tune Gd(@AuNPs) as an innovative diagnostic agent in the field of nanomedicine.

Keywords: Gd-gold complex, theoretical study, MRI, relaxivity, biodistribution

This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License.By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Excerpt from:
Design and Synthesis of Gold-Gadolinium-Core-Shell Nanoparticles as Co | IJN - Dove Medical Press

Read the Rest...

Newly Published Research Shows that Hologics Molecular Assays for Diagnosing Vaginitis are More Effective than Traditional Methods – STL.News

§ November 28th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Newly Published Research Shows that Hologics Molecular Assays for Diagnosing Vaginitis are More Effective than Traditional Methods – STL.News

(STL.News) Clinical evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of new FDA-cleared assays for the detection of vaginitis has been published online in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology. The prospective, multi-center clinical study is the first in the United States to formally validate the performance of the Aptima BV and Aptima CV/TV assays, available from Hologic, Inc. (Nasdaq: HOLX) on its fully automated Panther system.

Vaginitis, a condition that affects millions of women every year, is responsible for up to half of all gynecologic visits in the United States, as well as significant expense to the healthcare system.

As leaders in womens health, we delivered on the need for new, molecular assays for vaginitis that have higher sensitivity and specificity than traditional methods, said Kevin Thornal, Hologics division president, Diagnostic Solutions. This study demonstrates that our assays are better at diagnosing infection than previously available options, which ultimately will ensure women receive the right treatment sooner.

The study notes that women suffering from vaginitis are often underserved by the current paradigm of inaccurate or incomplete diagnosis guiding inadequate or inappropriate treatment. Prior to the introduction of molecular assays, clinicians had no choice but to analyze fresh vaginal discharge samples using a combination of older, subjective methods pH, a potassium hydroxide (KOH) whiff test and Gram-stained microscopic examination to identify the underlying cause.

The new Aptima molecular tests circumvent barriers to accurate diagnosis associated with the use of these traditional methods, including absence of proper equipment, lack of training, and access to microscopy in the clinic. These and other barriers can result in many women being misdiagnosed, which the study says can lead to incorrect, misguided or prolonged treatment. In fact, separate research shows that when treatment is based on diagnosis with these traditional methods, more than half of women with vaginitis experience recurring symptoms.

Many women try to self-diagnose and self-treat before eventually visiting a healthcare provider, assuming that abnormal vaginal discharge, itching or irritation is due to a simple yeast infection, said the studys corresponding author, Dr. Jane R. Schwebke, professor of medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. But BV or TV left untreated or improperly treated can put women at risk for a variety of complications, including an increased chance of getting sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as chlamydia or HIV, pelvic inflammatory disease, and pregnancy-related risks including premature delivery, low birth weight and infertility. These objective and comprehensive diagnostic tests will mitigate such risks and allow clinicians to feel more confident that theyre properly treating women.

BV (bacterial vaginosis) is the most common vaginal infection in the U.S., affecting an estimated 21 million women a year. Together with CV (vulvovaginal candidiasis) commonly known as yeast infections and TV (trichomonas vaginalis), individually or in combination, these three vaginal infections cause about 90 percent of vaginitis infections. Each cause of vaginitis has its own characteristics, consequences and treatment recommendations, which vary between BV, CV and TV, further reinforcing the need for accurate diagnoses.

Study Details

Subjects in the multi-center, cross-sectional diagnostic accuracy study for the Aptima BV and Aptima CV/TV assays were at least 14 years old with symptoms of vaginitis such as abnormal vaginal discharge, vaginal odor, genital itching or irritation, pain or discomfort during sexual intercourse or urination, edema or erythema. They were enrolled at 21 U.S. sites, including clinical research centers and emergency medicine, family planning, public health, STI and family medicine/obstetric-gynecologic (OB-GYN) facilities between June and October 2018.

Patient- and clinician-collected vaginal swab samples obtained from women with symptoms of vaginitis were tested with the Aptima BV and Aptima CV/TV assays. The prevalence of infection was similar for clinician- and patient-collected samples: 49 percent for BV, 29 percent for CV due to the Candida species group, 4 percent for CV due to C.glabrata, and 10 percent for TV. Sensitivity and specificity estimates for the tests in clinician-collected samples were, respectively, 95.0 percent and 89.6 percent for BV, 91.7 percent and 85.8 percent for the Candida species group, 84. percent and 99.1 percent for C. glabrata, and 96.5 percent and 98.9 percent for TV. Sensitivity and specificity were similar in patient-collected samples.

Hologic offers 16 FDA-cleared assays on the Panther system that detect more than 20 pathogens, offering the only high-throughput molecular diagnostic platform in the U.S. to combine comprehensive sexual health, cervical health, viral load, respiratory testing and open channel functionality on a fully automated system.

CLICK to VIEW SOURCE

291

Go here to see the original:
Newly Published Research Shows that Hologics Molecular Assays for Diagnosing Vaginitis are More Effective than Traditional Methods - STL.News

Read the Rest...

The Shocking history of the Torpedo Ray and other Electric Fish – Port St. Joe Star

§ November 28th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on The Shocking history of the Torpedo Ray and other Electric Fish – Port St. Joe Star

Many of us are aware of the lesser electric ray, Narcine brasiliensis, some perhaps too familiar considering the nearly 35-volt jolt it can deliver if touched. Less common locally is the related Atlantic torpedo, Torpedo nobiliana.

We intuitively understand the physical basis of an electric shock, with our lives dependent on an electrical infrastructure. Nevertheless, it is fascinating to reflect back in history, imagine how an electrical shock from a fish was viewed when all of nature was interpreted on the basis of four elements, air, earth, fire, and water. In contrast, electricity is a phenomenon of relatively recent history, popularized beginning in the 18th century by Benjamin Franklin flying his kite in a thunderstorm.

First, it is instructive to review the diversity of electric fish. Mostly, we think of electrogenic fish that produce an electric organ discharge (EOD). Then there are fish that are electrosensory, a sense we do not possess. Many fish are both electrosensory and generate EODs.

Fish can be strongly or weakly electrogenic. The former includes skates and rays, (the genus Torpedo contains 10 species, some generating EODs up to 220 volts), stargazers (to 50 volts), and the electric Nile catfish Malapterus electricus (to 350 volts). Most familiar is the South American electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, with EODs of up to 700 volts, jolts known to stun and disable a horse.

In contrast, weakly electric fish generate EODs around 1 volt, several hundred species in all including many common in the aquarium trade such as elephantnose and knifefishes. These fish are also electrosensory and communicate with each other electrically. Moreover, by monitoring objects that distort their own electric fields they can electrolocate, analogous to sonic location used by bats and porpoises, active mechanisms especially useful in the dark.

Other electrosensory fish are passive (no EODs), detecting the electrical fields of both animate and inanimate objects as weak as 1 nanovolt (10-9 V) per centimeter. To illustrate this extraordinary sensitivity consider that a shark can detect a flounder buried in the sand, and can navigate, monitoring its own electric field as it swims, its body acting as a conductor moving through the earths magnetic field, the biological equivalent of an electricity generator. The passive electrosense is a primitive feature found in lampreys, all elasmobranchs (sharks, skates and rays), sturgeon and paddlefish. Essentially an aquatic sensory mechanism, the duckbill platypus, a mammal, has developed a parallel electrosense used to detect prey.

The shocking history origins deal primarily with torpedoes abundant in Mediterranean waters and brought to the attention of scholars, physicians and philosophers during the classical Greco-Roman era. The earliest reference to torpedoes was in Hippocratic writings in the 5th century B.C. Plato and Socrates (4th century B.C.) alluded to their powers as magic, benumbing the mind, whereby the flat sea torpedo torpifies those who come into contact. The Greeks referred to the effect as nrk, from which narcotic, narcosis, narcotize were derived based on the fishs ability to cause numbness, torpor, and involuntary muscle twitches.

Aristotle (374-322 B.C.), writing in his Historia Animalium, noted its specialized numbing as a purposeful intelligence that it used to capture prey. He was supplied specimens by local fishermen and by Alexander the Great. These fishermen reported that the mysterious force of the torpedo could be felt even at a distance when touched holding a metal rod (trident) or the salty lines of a fishing net.

Pliny the Elder (1st century A.D.), the great Roman naturalist, wrote in his 37 volume Naturalis Historia that if only touched with the end of a spear or staff, this fish has the property of benumbing even the most vigorous arm and of riveting the feet of the runner. He interpreted the shock as an odor of emanation from the fish, a poison that could run up a spear and kill a man, even a horse, a mixture of science and fable.

Greco-Roman medical literature included many therapeutic uses for the torpedo discharge, of course without any idea of the force electricity. Among some 271 remedies ascribed to Scribonius (3 B.C.-54 A.D.) were treatments using torpedoes for headaches to gout. The latter, foot pain or podagra, was common among Roman aristocrats given their rich diets and lead poisoning from wine containers. The foot placed on a live torpedo on the moist shore relieved gout pain up to the knee. Headache relief involved placing a live torpedo on the spot of the pain but required subsequent removal lest ability to feel be taken away. This numbing effect is not so far-fetched knowing now that electrical stimulation is used clinically to relieve pain and thought to release endorphins.

In addition to relief of headache pain, Discorides (1st century A.D.) used torpedoes to treat a condition of the seat, now interpreted to mean application to the prolapsed seat (prolapsus ani in Latin), that is, hemorrhoids. This form of electrotherapy is potentially valid given that electrical stimulation can cause constriction of blood vessels and hemorrhoidal shrinkage.

Galen (129-200 A.D.), the most accomplished physician and philosopher in Roman antiquity, also tested the shock of the torpedo, finding it useful in treating headaches. In describing its analgesic remedy, he likened the effect to a cold venom, some form of corpuscular matter. He equated hand numbness transmitted through the trident to the lodestone (a magnet) effect in which a body can acquire the power of a separate object.

The immobilizing actions of the torpedo also captured the imagination of ancient poets who suggested that catching a torpedo can make an angler remorseful. Oppian (2nd century A.D.), writes poetically that the Cramp-fish (torpedo) paint their magick wands, where icy torch the strongest fin commands one touch of hers dams up the vital Flood, Contracts the Nerves, and clots the stagnate Blood. Torpedoes also appeared prominently in Mediterranean paintings and pottery.

Authors from classical antiquity significantly influenced how torpedoes, along with the Nile catfish, were perceived well into the Middle Ages, a period during which Christianity and Islam emerged along with a decline in the spirit of scientific investigation, the Dark Ages. Physicians still used torpedoes for head pain and podagra as specified in medical texts. Byzantine writings concerning nrk were essentially compilations from the previous classical era and associated the magical powers with various occult practices.

Well into the Renaissance, despite advances in architecture, medicine, and science, there was no further insight into the nature of the discharge. By the 16th century, European exploration and conquest had generated considerable interest in the torporific (electric) eel that horrified natives along the Orinoco River in South America. Still, the only explanation available was that the torpedo discharge was mechanical, associated with violent contractions in the fish.

The discharge itself was interpreted at the time according to atomistic theories of sensation attributed largely to Galileo, whereby microscopic pores, canals and glands produced minute corpuscles (atoms) used to explain multiple physiological processes including perspiration. This was incorporated in Stefano Lorenzinis (1678) corpuscular theory attributing numbness to corpuscles (molti corpuscoli) that entered the hand to block nerves as a result of touching the fish. The mechanical theory was later discredited since contractions by the torpedo proved to be invisible, unrepeatable, and any movements were no doubt affected by the tremor induced in the experimenters hand in response to the shock.

Electricity as a physical entity became established in mid-17th century Europe, confirmed scientifically by the 18th using instruments such as the Leyden jar, a capacitor that was introduced into the publics imagination by Abbe Jean-Antoine Nollet (1700-1770), in a demonstration before royal onlookers in Versailles that 180 hand-holding grenadiers who completed the circuit leaped in unison at its discharge.

These instruments were capable of producing sparks, akin to static electricity we can generate by stroking fur or amber, and were seemingly related to the demonstration of atmospheric electricity by Benjamin Franklin. Self-educated, Franklin abandoned his lucrative printing business in 1748 to study electricity and later moved to England in 1757 to join the Royal Society of London, where he contributed prominently to developments in fish electricity. He also is credited with the concept of polarity, based on his theory that lightning is charged differently between clouds (negative) and land (positive), and concluding that natural and man-made electricity are the same.

As interest in electricity grew in the 18th century, it led to numerous attempts, including by Franklin, to use electrotherapy to treat palsies, hysteria, and other paralyzing illnesses. Still, despite the ancient history of torpedo therapeutics, no scientific understanding of animal electricity was yet available. Although nerves were envisioned as conduits to the brain as early as the 4th century B.C., conveyance (conduction) along the nerve was still attributed variously to ethereal spirits, fluids, or mechanical vibrations.

As interest in animal electricity continued to grow, electric fish contributed significantly to the eventual electrical basis of physiological function in both nerve and muscle. A major contribution from the Dutch, with settlements in Guiana, S.A., came from awareness of the more powerful electric eel whose discharge was equated with that of the Leyden jar, both capable of knocking a person to the ground. The only difference was that neither spark (eq., lightning) nor weak crackling sound (eq., thunder) could be elicited from the eel, facts that contributed to remaining resistance to the idea of fish electricity.

An American physician who worked briefly in Guiana (Edward Bancroft, 1744-1821) presented evidence that shocks from the torporific eel traveled up the fishing line and could be felt by several people holding hands (in series). John Walsh (1726-1795), a wealthy English colonel with an interest in natural history provided singular evidence for the electrical nature of Torpedo.

Armed with a series of experiments outlined by his collaborator, Benjamin Franklin, Walsh traveled to La Rochelle and nearby lIsle de R on the French Atlantic coast where the rays were abundant. Using public demonstrations he showed that the discharge could be felt 40 feet away when connected to the fish by a wire, that up to eight persons holding hands in series were affected, and that two persons, one touching the upper surface of the fish, the other the lower surface, only felt the shock when they completed the circuit by holding hands. In letters back to Franklin, Walsh concluded that the effect is certainly torpedinal electricity.

His work was forwarded to Henry Cavendish (1731-1810), the brilliant chemist (discoverer of oxygen), physicist and member of the Royal Society (along with Walsh, Franklin, Bancroft and other notables), who provided quantitative explanations supporting fish electricity. Franklin returned to the United States in 1775 in fear of arrest as a spy as progression toward the American Revolution became obvious. Ironically, it was August 1, 1776, when Walsh finally succeeded in demonstrating the convincing spark from a fish discharge, made possible by the arrival of a live electric eel from Guiana whose discharge was 10 times greater than the torpedo.

The torpedo and electric eel were important in the realization that animals function electrically. As such they had great influence on two Italian physician scientists, Luigi Galvani (1773-1798) and Alessandro Volta (1745-1827). Galvanis experiments led him to propose that electricity was inherent in the tissues of the nerve by demonstrating that frog leg muscles twitched when the [motor] nerve was stimulated with a weak electrical current. One such experiment used long wires connected to an electrical device in the room. This is known to have inspired Mary Shelley to create Frankenstein in her 1817 saga by attracting the electrical activity from a lightning storm.

Volta claimed that the electricity was not intrinsic to the nerve but rather originated in the metals Galvani used to touch the nerve. His own experiments with the frog used a pile or battery that he is credited with inventing. This first battery, dissimilar metals sandwiched around moistened cardboard, was inspired in turn by the electric organ of the torpedo. From these signature experiments, preceded by work through the ages, it is clear that torporific fishes have played a major role in shaping civilization through the life sciences and medicine.

Lon Wilkens, an emeritus professor of neuroscience at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, lives on St. George Island.

Read more:
The Shocking history of the Torpedo Ray and other Electric Fish - Port St. Joe Star

Read the Rest...

TLC Announces First Patient Enrollment in EXCELLENCE Trial Evaluating Single and Repeat Administrations of TLC599 – BioSpace

§ November 27th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on TLC Announces First Patient Enrollment in EXCELLENCE Trial Evaluating Single and Repeat Administrations of TLC599 – BioSpace

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. and TAIPEI, Taiwan, Nov. 27, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- TLC (Nasdaq: TLC, TWO: 4152), a clinical-stage specialty pharmaceutical company developing novel nanomedicines to target areas of unmet medical need in pain management, ophthalmology and oncology, announced today that the first patient has been enrolled in EXCELLENCE, the Phase III pivotal clinical trial for TLC599 in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) knee pain. TLC599 is a non-opioid, proprietary BioSeizer sustained release formulation of dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) intended to manage OA pain for up to six months.

The initiation of EXCELLENCE was supported by findings from a Phase II, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial in patients with OA of the knee, in which TLC599 12mg demonstrated statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in pain relief in both the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores compared to placebo from Day 3 all the way through the end of the study at 24 weeks. Over half of the patients in the TLC599 group had a durable response, maintaining at least 30% pain reduction in both WOMAC and VAS pain scores at all visits through the entire 24 weeks.

EXCELLENCE, the Phase III, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active comparator-controlled pivotal study, will evaluate the efficacy and safety of a single as well as a repeat dose of TLC599 12mg in approximately 500 patients with moderate to severe symptomatic knee OA with radiographic severity of Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) Grade 2 to 3. The trial will take place across 40-50 sites in the US and Australia. On Day 1, patients are randomized in a 2:1:1 ratio to receive an intraarticular injection of TLC599, DSP (a glucocorticoid widely used in the treatment of joint pain) or placebo (normal saline). At Week 24, patients can receive a second blinded injection of TLC599 or placebo. Patient enrollment is expected take about one year; all patients will be followed for a total of 52 weeks.

The primary efficacy endpoint is the magnitude of pain relief by WOMAC Pain score versus placebo at Week 16 and Week 40. Key secondary endpoints include the magnitude of pain relief by WOMAC Pain or Function scores versus placebo or DSP at Weeks 16, 20, 24 and through 52 weeks as well as patient global impression of change (PGIC).

We are optimistic about the results of EXCELLENCE, remarked George Yeh, President of TLC. If results are positive, the data would support a New Drug Application (NDA) for TLC599 with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). And if approved for repeat administration by the FDA, two simple injections of TLC599 would potentially alleviate the pain associated with OA for a full year, deterring the use of addictive opioids and avoiding the need for knee replacement surgery.

More information on EXCELLENCE can be found on ClinicalTrials.gov.

About TLC599

TLC599 is a BioSeizer sustained release formulation of DSP intended for the treatment of OA pain. Current intraarticular anti-inflammatory treatments for OA have potentially toxic side effects and may lead to the destruction of cartilage filler proteins. An in vivo toxicity study by staining of the cartilage showed TLC599 to be cartilage sparing compared to current treatments. In a Phase II clinical trial, a single injection of TLC599 resulted in statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in pain relief in both WOMAC and VAS scores compared to placebo through 24 weeks. EXCELLENCE, a multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active comparator-controlled pivotal Phase III clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of both single and repeated doses of TLC599, is currently underway.

About TLC

TLC (NASDAQ: TLC, TWO: 4152) is a clinical-stage specialty pharmaceutical company dedicated to the research and development of novel nanomedicines that maximize the potential of its proprietary lipid-assembled drug delivery platform (LipAD). TLC believes that its deep experience with liposome science allows a combination of onset speed and benefit duration, improving active drug concentrations while decreasing unwanted systemic exposures. TLCs BioSeizer technology is designed to enable local sustained release of therapeutic agents at the site of disease or injury; its NanoX active drug loading technology has been proven in two approved drugs and is designed to alter the systemic exposure of a drug, potentially reducing dosing frequency and enhancing distribution of liposome-encapsulated active agents to the desired site. These technologies are versatile in the choice of active pharmaceutical ingredients, and scalable with respect to manufacturing. TLC has a diverse, wholly owned portfolio of therapeutics that target areas of unmet medical need in pain management, ophthalmology, and oncology.

Cautionary Note on Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements contained in this press release include, without limitation, statements regarding TLCs expectations regarding the clinical development of TLC599, the clinical benefits of TLC599 for knee osteoarthritis, the timing, scope, progress and outcome of the clinical trials, and the anticipated timelines for the release of clinical data. Words such as may, believe, will, expect, plan, anticipate, estimate, intend and similar expressions (as well as other words or expressions referencing future events, conditions or circumstances) are intended to identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve a number of risks, assumptions, uncertainties and factors, including risks that the outcome of any clinical trial is inherently uncertain and TLC599 or any of our other product candidates may prove to be unsafe or ineffective, or may not achieve commercial approval. Other risks are described in the Risk Factors section of TLCs annual report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2018 filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. All forward-looking statements are based on TLCs expectations and assumptions as of the date of this press release. Actual results may differ materially from these forward-looking statements. Except as required by law, TLC expressly disclaims any responsibility to update any forward-looking statement contained herein, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

Go here to see the original:
TLC Announces First Patient Enrollment in EXCELLENCE Trial Evaluating Single and Repeat Administrations of TLC599 - BioSpace

Read the Rest...

Here’s what you need to know about superbugs in the ‘post-antibiotic era’ – The Province

§ November 27th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Here’s what you need to know about superbugs in the ‘post-antibiotic era’ – The Province

By Danielle Edwards

Antibiotics are considered one of the greatest breakthroughs in modern medicine. But in the United States, 35,000 people die a year after succumbing to germs that have evolved the ability to fend off the drugs designed to kill them. Its why two reports from the Centres for Disease Control (CDC) and an expert panel commissioned by the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) have rung the alarm on antibiotic resistance, saying that millions of lives worldwide are at risk. Heres what you need to know about the rise of superbugs and why some experts are calling it the worlds deadliest health crisis.

How are antibiotics made?

Antibiotics are actually created naturally by bacteria to kill off neighbouring predatory organisms in an ecosystem.

In fact, Alexander Fleming made his world-changing discovery of penicillin in 1928 after observing a type of mould had antibiotic properties.

Scientists would go on to harvest soil samples to isolate more germ-killing medicine from microbes that organically evolved defence mechanisms.

Brett Finlay, a microbiology professor at the University of British Columbia, said its a simple process of natural selection.

When you put a selection pressure on any microbe, a small number of them are going to figure out how to avoid it if they can, he said.

Finlay, who sat as the chair for the CCA panel, added that microbes could evolve to reinforce their outer shells. The problem, he said, starts when those resistant microbes start to multiply.

Whats causes antibiotic resistance?

Mass antibiotic use started in earnest during the Second World War, and with large-scale usage came faster resistance rates. Finlay explained that, unlike humans, bacteria can much more effectively swap genetic information.

Once you have a resistance gene, which then resists these antibiotics in the population, it then spreads from microbe to microbe quite easily, he said.

The drugs are now used in several sectors. Though the CCA report stressed there was no one area to blame, it did list factors that have contributed to the weakening of antibiotic treatments.

The CDC estimates doctors prescribe 47 million courses of antibiotics yearly for infections that dont need them in the U.S.

The bulk of antibiotics in Canada 78 per cent are used in the production of livestock, some of them the same drugs used to treat human pathogens, which ups the chances of those germs developing resistance, as well.

Whats the worst-case scenario?

Both the reports warn of the wide-reaching effects of antibiotic resistance, like lower food production, increased hospital costs and the onset of millions of infections with no way to treat them.

Stop referring to a coming post-antibiotic era its already here, CDC Director Robert Redfield said in a letter accompanying the organizations report. You and I are living in a time when some miracle drugs no longer perform miracles and families are being ripped apart by a microscopic enemy.

Bacteria that cause illnesses like urinary tract infections and gonorrhea are some of the microbes researchers are most concerned about, especially since its becoming nearly impossible to develop new antibiotics, Finlay said.

Financial and scientific obstacles meant that no new major classes of antibiotics were approved to treat infections between 1962 and 2000.

In 2018, 26 per cent of diagnosed infections in Canada required further treatment and that number could jump to 40 per cent by 2050.

While the CDC said the number of infection-related deaths has decreased since it released a 2013 report on the resistance phenomenon, more than 2.8 million antibiotic-resistant infections are diagnosed in the U.S. every year.

There could be an enormous economic cost, as well. The CCA report projected the phenomenon could reduce Canadas GDP by up to $21 billion per year and rack up $8 billion in healthcare costs over the next thirty years.

Mitigation efforts?

Fighting antibiotics with antibiotics isnt the answer, the reports note. But they both say infection prevention, which includes good old handwashing, is one of the best ways to cut down on antibiotic use. Fewer infections means less need to prescribe the germ-killing drugs.

And medical innovations, like phage therapy which uses viruses to kill bacteria, could mean the end of our dependence on antibiotics.

Finlay said one of the biggest ways to slow the increase in resistance is stewardship making sure antibiotics are only used when theyre absolutely necessary.

You dont need antibiotic-containing detergents (that) youre using on your countertops to clean them. You dont have to use hand sanitizer every time you go out the door, he said.

Its not all bad news. There have been government efforts to lower antibiotic use (Health Canada announced last year the drugs could only be used for livestock with a valid prescription), but Finlay said it will take combined efforts from the healthcare sector and governments to take on the threat.

Its going to affect everyone, no one is immune from this, said Finlay. Whatever station in life you are, you get infections, and you need antibiotics. And if theyre not there, you suffer.

Read more:
Here's what you need to know about superbugs in the 'post-antibiotic era' - The Province

Read the Rest...

Sore muscles after activity: What it means and relief – Medical News Today

§ November 27th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Sore muscles after activity: What it means and relief – Medical News Today

Any physical activity that places too much or unusual strain on the muscles can lead to soreness. Everyone can experience muscle soreness, even people who exercise regularly and have good physical fitness.

Muscle soreness can be uncomfortable and disruptive. However, the pain typically disappears within a few days.

This article outlines the causes of muscle soreness and the typical duration of symptoms. We also list the treatments that may help to relieve muscle soreness, along with research into their effectiveness.

During physical activity, the body's muscles extend and contract to support movement. Prolonged or repetitive physical activity can overexert the muscles. This activity can lead to muscle soreness.

Overexertion and muscle soreness are more likely to occur after physical activity that differs from normal. This could be due to:

Muscle soreness usually occurs several hours after physical activity. For this reason, doctors refer to the condition as delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Most people experience DOMS at some point, regardless of their physical fitness.

The exact cause of DOMS is still unclear. Some experts believe it may be due to microscopic tears in the muscle fibers, which can develop during exercise. They believe that muscle soreness is the result of the body healing these tears. DOMS is not due to a buildup of lactic acid in the muscles.

According to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), muscle soreness usually begins 1224 hours following exercise. The muscle soreness then tends to peak around 2472 hours after the exercise. After this time, the pain should start to go away.

The level of soreness a person feels during DOMS depends on the type, duration, and frequency of the activity that caused the pain.

It is possible to continue exercising with muscle soreness, but it can be uncomfortable.

Sharp pains that occur immediately after activity could be a sign of injuries, such as strains or sprains. These injuries are the result of a muscle, tendon, or ligament becoming stretched or torn and are more severe than DOMS, possibly requiring medical attention.

Muscle soreness is normal and rarely requires medical attention. In most cases, symptoms go away on their own within a few days. In the meantime, it is best to avoid putting too much strain on the injured muscles.

People sometimes recommend the following treatments to alleviate muscle soreness following exercise:

Massage: A qualified sports massage therapist or physiotherapist can provide massages for alleviating muscle soreness. Massages increase blood flow to the injured area, which may promote healing and help to relieve the pain.

Heat therapy: Taking a warm bath or applying heat pads can also stimulate blood flow to the injured muscles. Heat therapy tends to offer only temporary symptom relief.

Cold therapy: Cold packs or immersion in cold water can reduce inflammation and swelling in the muscles. Cold therapy is, therefore, useful as a longer-term treatment for muscle injuries.

Light exercise: Keeping the muscles active may help to reduce pain. It is important to keep the intensity light and avoid movements that put too much strain on injured muscles. Examples of light exercises include walking and gentle stretching.

Pain medication: Over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help to reduce muscle inflammation and associated pain.

A 2012 meta-analysis investigated the effectiveness of four popular DOMS treatments. The meta-analysis included 35 studies, each of which investigated one of the following treatments:

The meta-analysis revealed that massage was effective in treating the signs and symptoms of DOMS in some people. However, the effect was small and was not significant across the group as a whole. There was no evidence to support the use of cryotherapy, stretching, or light exercise in treating DOMS.

A 2011 meta-analysis also found that stretching before or after exercise does not lead to a noticeable reduction in DOMS.

A 2016 meta-analysis investigated whether a type of cryotherapy called cold water immersion (CWI) helps to alleviate muscle soreness. The results showed that CWI was slightly more effective than no treatment. Bathing in water temperatures between 11C15C for 1115 minutes provided the best results.

Overall, these studies indicate that there are few scientifically proven treatments for DOMS. Those that are effective appear to provide only a slight benefit. Nonetheless, some people may find the treatments helpful.

Importantly, while a treatment may help to alleviate pain, it will not undo the underlying muscle damage or improve muscle function.

While it is not possible to completely prevent DOMS, a person can take steps to reduce the severity of symptoms.

According to the ACSM, the best way to do this is to build up slowly to any changes in exercise routines. This cautious approach will give the muscles time to adapt to the changes they are experiencing.

Physical activity can sometimes lead to DOMS. The symptoms of DOMS usually appear several hours after physical activity and may last up to 72 hours.

While DOMS can be uncomfortable, it does not require medical attention. People sometimes recommend home remedies to alleviate the symptoms, but there is little scientific evidence to support this. It may be necessary to try multiple treatments before finding one that helps in some way.

People may experience a sharp pain during or immediately after physical activity. This sensation could signal a more serious injury, such as a strain or sprain. People should see a doctor if the pain persists or worsens.

Continued here:
Sore muscles after activity: What it means and relief - Medical News Today

Read the Rest...

Newly Published Research Shows that Hologics Molecular Assays for Diagnosing Vaginitis are More Effective than Traditional Methods – Yahoo Finance

§ November 27th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Newly Published Research Shows that Hologics Molecular Assays for Diagnosing Vaginitis are More Effective than Traditional Methods – Yahoo Finance

MARLBOROUGH, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--

More sensitive and specific assays for vaginitis reduce the incorrect, misguided or prolonged treatment that can result from older, subjective testing methods

Clinical evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of new FDA-cleared assays for the detection of vaginitis has been published online in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology. The prospective, multi-center clinical study is the first in the United States to formally validate the performance of the Aptima BV and Aptima CV/TV assays, available from Hologic, Inc. (HOLX) on its fully automated Panther system.

Vaginitis, a condition that affects millions of women every year, is responsible for up to half of all gynecologic visits in the United States, as well as significant expense to the healthcare system.1

As leaders in womens health, we delivered on the need for new, molecular assays for vaginitis that have higher sensitivity and specificity than traditional methods, said Kevin Thornal, Hologics division president, Diagnostic Solutions. This study demonstrates that our assays are better at diagnosing infection than previously available options, which ultimately will ensure women receive the right treatment sooner.

The study notes that women suffering from vaginitis are often underserved by the current paradigm of inaccurate or incomplete diagnosis guiding inadequate or inappropriate treatment. Prior to the introduction of molecular assays, clinicians had no choice but to analyze fresh vaginal discharge samples using a combination of older, subjective methods pH, a potassium hydroxide (KOH) whiff test and Gram-stained microscopic examination to identify the underlying cause.

The new Aptima molecular tests circumvent barriers to accurate diagnosis associated with the use of these traditional methods, including absence of proper equipment, lack of training, and access to microscopy in the clinic. These and other barriers can result in many women being misdiagnosed, which the study says can lead to incorrect, misguided or prolonged treatment.1 In fact, separate research shows that when treatment is based on diagnosis with these traditional methods, more than half of women with vaginitis experience recurring symptoms.2

Many women try to self-diagnose and self-treat before eventually visiting a healthcare provider, assuming that abnormal vaginal discharge, itching or irritation is due to a simple yeast infection, said the studys corresponding author, Dr. Jane R. Schwebke, professor of medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. But BV or TV left untreated or improperly treated can put women at risk for a variety of complications, including an increased chance of getting sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as chlamydia or HIV, pelvic inflammatory disease, and pregnancy-related risks including premature delivery, low birth weight and infertility.2,4 These objective and comprehensive diagnostic tests will mitigate such risks and allow clinicians to feel more confident that theyre properly treating women.

BV (bacterial vaginosis) is the most common vaginal infection in the U.S., affecting an estimated 21 million women a year.3 Together with CV (vulvovaginal candidiasis) commonly known as yeast infections and TV (trichomonas vaginalis), individually or in combination, these three vaginal infections cause about 90 percent of vaginitis infections.2,4 Each cause of vaginitis has its own characteristics, consequences and treatment recommendations, which vary between BV, CV and TV, further reinforcing the need for accurate diagnoses.

Study Details

Subjects in the multi-center, cross-sectional diagnostic accuracy study for the Aptima BV and Aptima CV/TV assays were at least 14 years old with symptoms of vaginitis such as abnormal vaginal discharge, vaginal odor, genital itching or irritation, pain or discomfort during sexual intercourse or urination, edema or erythema. They were enrolled at 21 U.S. sites, including clinical research centers and emergency medicine, family planning, public health, STI and family medicine/obstetric-gynecologic (OB-GYN) facilities between June and October 2018.

Patient- and clinician-collected vaginal swab samples obtained from women with symptoms of vaginitis were tested with the Aptima BV and Aptima CV/TV assays. The prevalence of infection was similar for clinician- and patient-collected samples: 49 percent for BV, 29 percent for CV due to the Candida species group, 4 percent for CV due to C. glabrata, and 10 percent for TV. Sensitivity and specificity estimates for the tests in clinician-collected samples were, respectively, 95.0 percent and 89.6 percent for BV, 91.7 percent and 85.8 percent for the Candida species group, 84.7 percent and 99.1 percent for C. glabrata, and 96.5 percent and 98.9 percent for TV. Sensitivity and specificity were similar in patient-collected samples.

Story continues

Hologic offers 16 FDA-cleared assays on the Panther system that detect more than 20 pathogens, offering the only high-throughput molecular diagnostic platform in the U.S. to combine comprehensive sexual health, cervical health, viral load, respiratory testing and open channel functionality on a fully automated system.

For more information on the Aptima BV and Aptima CV/TV assays, visit http://www.hologic.com.

About Hologic

Hologic, Inc. is an innovative medical technology company primarily focused on improving womens health and well-being through early detection and treatment. For more information on Hologic, visit http://www.hologic.com.

Hologic Forward-Looking Statements

This press release may contain forward-looking information that involves risks and uncertainties, including statements about the use of Hologics diagnostic products. There can be no assurance these products will achieve the benefits described herein or that such benefits will be replicated in any particular manner with respect to an individual patient. The actual effect of the use of the products can only be determined on a case-by-case basis depending on the particular circumstances and patient in question. In addition, there can be no assurance that these products will be commercially successful or achieve any expected level of sales. Hologic expressly disclaims any obligation or undertaking to release publicly any updates or revisions to any such statements presented herein to reflect any change in expectations or any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statements are based.

Hologic, Aptima, Panther and The Science of Sure are registered trademarks of Hologic, Inc. in the United States and/or other countries.

Source: Hologic, Inc.

____________________

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20191125005200/en/

Read more:
Newly Published Research Shows that Hologics Molecular Assays for Diagnosing Vaginitis are More Effective than Traditional Methods - Yahoo Finance

Read the Rest...

2 newborns sickened by tick bites could signal an increase in infections among babies – CNN

§ November 27th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on 2 newborns sickened by tick bites could signal an increase in infections among babies – CNN

The infants, one girl and a boy, were taken to hospitals in New York because they were experiencing common signs of infection: rashes, fever and irritability.

What wasn't common to the doctors who treated the babies were the more unusual symptoms: anemia, an elevated heart rate and a low blood platelet count.

The doctors, from Stony Brook Children's Hospital and Hampton Community Healthcare in New York, said that the infants were suffering from tick-borne infections that are rare in newborns because of limited exposure.

"These two cases really underscore just the extent to which these ticks are spreading and bringing the tick-borne infections along with them," said Dr. Andrew Handel, who helped treat the babies and practices in the Pediatric Infectious Diseases division at Stony Brook Children's Hospital. "As we see those ticks being spread throughout the community, we also see a growing population of individuals who can become infected with them."

Changes in land use patterns may contribute to the spread of ticks, as suburban development in forest areas means ticks and animal hosts are in close contact.

Unusual cases

A 6-week-old previously healthy infant boy was brought to a hospital in June after experiencing symptoms including irritability, poor feeding, vomiting and high fever.

Lab results showed the boy was also anemic, with a low blood platelet count.

He was treated with antibiotics and was transferred to Stony Brook Children's Hospital, where more testing revealed worsening anemia and blood platelet counts, as well as elevated levels of liver enzymes, which hint at an injured liver and a risk for liver disease.

His mother remembered seeing a bloody "flea" on her son's arm 20 days before his symptoms began. The family lives in a tick-endemic area, their home surrounded by tall grasses. Tick-borne diseases occur most frequently in the Northeast, mid-Atlantic and Upper Midwest.

Another round of antibiotics was started, but the boy's hemoglobin level severely dropped, requiring a packed red blood cell transfusion.

In August, a 5-week-old previously healthy infant girl was brought to the hospital emergency department because of a fever and an unusual rash.

Her parents reported removing an engorged black bug from her ear six days before her symptoms started. Their baby was rarely outdoors, although the family's dogs walked outside.

"Pets are well-known to carry ticks into the home. So take avoidance maneuvers," said Dr. Paul Auwaerter, clinical director of infectious diseases at John Hopkins University School of Medicine. "Shampoo or collars can be helpful." Auwaerter was not involved in either of the case studies.

The baby girl's heart was beating at a higher than normal rate. She was diagnosed with early disseminated Lyme disease, meaning the bacteria causing the disease had spread throughout her body.

Both babies' illnesses were remedied by rounds of antibiotics, but because no data exists to guide Lyme disease management in newborns, doctors referred to the American Academy of Pediatrics Red Book, which offers care solutions for infectious diseases.

There are also no clinically validated or FDA-approved tests for tick-borne infection for newborns.

Many questions remain, but the doctors thought that reporting their "ideas and conclusions that we came up with while treating these two infants might be helpful for future providers who come across similar cases," Handel said.

For older groups, there is testing to find tick-borne illnesses earlier and treatments that resolve symptoms. Both help to prevent long-term complications.

Protecting your kids and pets from tick bites

Children have a higher risk of getting Lyme and other tick-borne diseases because they tend to be more exposed to them.

"Kids, especially when they get beyond a certain age, bathe themselves, and they're not really looking for ticks," Auwaerter said. "Children tend to be outdoors more in play."

Having pets leaves your family more at risk, too. They can carry ticks in from outside, and sometimes the ticks are hard to find because of a pet's fur. Pet owners can talk with their veterinarians about medications for preventing tick bites.

There are ways you can protect yourself, your kids and your pets getting tick-borne diseases -- most importantly, "doing your nightly tick checks," Handel said.

The CDC recommends also avoiding high grasses, using insect repellent, bathing or showering as soon as you get inside, conducting full body tick checks and putting clothes in the dryer on high heat to kill ticks.

Although tick-borne illnesses are rare for newborns, doctors should consider them if they meet an infant who has a fever, an unusual rash or other signs of infection and lives in a tick-endemic area, Handel said.

"We don't want parents to hear about these cases and have an excess of anxiety that this could happen to their child," Handel said. "Of course, that did happen and it can happen. But this is very unusual."

See the original post:
2 newborns sickened by tick bites could signal an increase in infections among babies - CNN

Read the Rest...

Here’s what you need to know about superbugs in the ‘post-antibiotic era’ – Vancouver Sun

§ November 26th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Here’s what you need to know about superbugs in the ‘post-antibiotic era’ – Vancouver Sun

By Danielle Edwards

Antibiotics are considered one of the greatest breakthroughs in modern medicine. But in the United States, 35,000 people die a year after succumbing to germs that have evolved the ability to fend off the drugs designed to kill them. Its why two reports from the Centres for Disease Control (CDC) and an expert panel commissioned by the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) have rung the alarm on antibiotic resistance, saying that millions of lives worldwide are at risk. Heres what you need to know about the rise of superbugs and why some experts are calling it the worlds deadliest health crisis.

How are antibiotics made?

Antibiotics are actually created naturally by bacteria to kill off neighbouring predatory organisms in an ecosystem.

In fact, Alexander Fleming made his world-changing discovery of penicillin in 1928 after observing a type of mould had antibiotic properties.

Scientists would go on to harvest soil samples to isolate more germ-killing medicine from microbes that organically evolved defence mechanisms.

Brett Finlay, a microbiology professor at the University of British Columbia, said its a simple process of natural selection.

When you put a selection pressure on any microbe, a small number of them are going to figure out how to avoid it if they can, he said.

Finlay, who sat as the chair for the CCA panel, added that microbes could evolve to reinforce their outer shells. The problem, he said, starts when those resistant microbes start to multiply.

Whats causes antibiotic resistance?

Mass antibiotic use started in earnest during the Second World War, and with large-scale usage came faster resistance rates. Finlay explained that, unlike humans, bacteria can much more effectively swap genetic information.

Once you have a resistance gene, which then resists these antibiotics in the population, it then spreads from microbe to microbe quite easily, he said.

The drugs are now used in several sectors. Though the CCA report stressed there was no one area to blame, it did list factors that have contributed to the weakening of antibiotic treatments.

The CDC estimates doctors prescribe 47 million courses of antibiotics yearly for infections that dont need them in the U.S.

The bulk of antibiotics in Canada 78 per cent are used in the production of livestock, some of them the same drugs used to treat human pathogens, which ups the chances of those germs developing resistance, as well.

Whats the worst-case scenario?

Both the reports warn of the wide-reaching effects of antibiotic resistance, like lower food production, increased hospital costs and the onset of millions of infections with no way to treat them.

Stop referring to a coming post-antibiotic era its already here, CDC Director Robert Redfield said in a letter accompanying the organizations report. You and I are living in a time when some miracle drugs no longer perform miracles and families are being ripped apart by a microscopic enemy.

Bacteria that cause illnesses like urinary tract infections and gonorrhea are some of the microbes researchers are most concerned about, especially since its becoming nearly impossible to develop new antibiotics, Finlay said.

Financial and scientific obstacles meant that no new major classes of antibiotics were approved to treat infections between 1962 and 2000.

In 2018, 26 per cent of diagnosed infections in Canada required further treatment and that number could jump to 40 per cent by 2050.

While the CDC said the number of infection-related deaths has decreased since it released a 2013 report on the resistance phenomenon, more than 2.8 million antibiotic-resistant infections are diagnosed in the U.S. every year.

There could be an enormous economic cost, as well. The CCA report projected the phenomenon could reduce Canadas GDP by up to $21 billion per year and rack up $8 billion in healthcare costs over the next thirty years.

Mitigation efforts?

Fighting antibiotics with antibiotics isnt the answer, the reports note. But they both say infection prevention, which includes good old handwashing, is one of the best ways to cut down on antibiotic use. Fewer infections means less need to prescribe the germ-killing drugs.

And medical innovations, like phage therapy which uses viruses to kill bacteria, could mean the end of our dependence on antibiotics.

Finlay said one of the biggest ways to slow the increase in resistance is stewardship making sure antibiotics are only used when theyre absolutely necessary.

You dont need antibiotic-containing detergents (that) youre using on your countertops to clean them. You dont have to use hand sanitizer every time you go out the door, he said.

Its not all bad news. There have been government efforts to lower antibiotic use (Health Canada announced last year the drugs could only be used for livestock with a valid prescription), but Finlay said it will take combined efforts from the healthcare sector and governments to take on the threat.

Its going to affect everyone, no one is immune from this, said Finlay. Whatever station in life you are, you get infections, and you need antibiotics. And if theyre not there, you suffer.

More:
Here's what you need to know about superbugs in the 'post-antibiotic era' - Vancouver Sun

Read the Rest...

Newly Published Research Shows that Hologic’s Molecular Assays for Diagnosing Vaginitis are More Effective than Traditional Methods – Business Wire

§ November 26th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Newly Published Research Shows that Hologic’s Molecular Assays for Diagnosing Vaginitis are More Effective than Traditional Methods – Business Wire

MARLBOROUGH, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Clinical evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of new FDA-cleared assays for the detection of vaginitis has been published online in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology. The prospective, multi-center clinical study is the first in the United States to formally validate the performance of the Aptima BV and Aptima CV/TV assays, available from Hologic, Inc. (Nasdaq: HOLX) on its fully automated Panther system.

Vaginitis, a condition that affects millions of women every year, is responsible for up to half of all gynecologic visits in the United States, as well as significant expense to the healthcare system.1

As leaders in womens health, we delivered on the need for new, molecular assays for vaginitis that have higher sensitivity and specificity than traditional methods, said Kevin Thornal, Hologics division president, Diagnostic Solutions. This study demonstrates that our assays are better at diagnosing infection than previously available options, which ultimately will ensure women receive the right treatment sooner.

The study notes that women suffering from vaginitis are often underserved by the current paradigm of inaccurate or incomplete diagnosis guiding inadequate or inappropriate treatment. Prior to the introduction of molecular assays, clinicians had no choice but to analyze fresh vaginal discharge samples using a combination of older, subjective methods pH, a potassium hydroxide (KOH) whiff test and Gram-stained microscopic examination to identify the underlying cause.

The new Aptima molecular tests circumvent barriers to accurate diagnosis associated with the use of these traditional methods, including absence of proper equipment, lack of training, and access to microscopy in the clinic. These and other barriers can result in many women being misdiagnosed, which the study says can lead to incorrect, misguided or prolonged treatment.1 In fact, separate research shows that when treatment is based on diagnosis with these traditional methods, more than half of women with vaginitis experience recurring symptoms.2

Many women try to self-diagnose and self-treat before eventually visiting a healthcare provider, assuming that abnormal vaginal discharge, itching or irritation is due to a simple yeast infection, said the studys corresponding author, Dr. Jane R. Schwebke, professor of medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. But BV or TV left untreated or improperly treated can put women at risk for a variety of complications, including an increased chance of getting sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as chlamydia or HIV, pelvic inflammatory disease, and pregnancy-related risks including premature delivery, low birth weight and infertility.2,4 These objective and comprehensive diagnostic tests will mitigate such risks and allow clinicians to feel more confident that theyre properly treating women.

BV (bacterial vaginosis) is the most common vaginal infection in the U.S., affecting an estimated 21 million women a year.3 Together with CV (vulvovaginal candidiasis) commonly known as yeast infections and TV (trichomonas vaginalis), individually or in combination, these three vaginal infections cause about 90 percent of vaginitis infections.2,4 Each cause of vaginitis has its own characteristics, consequences and treatment recommendations, which vary between BV, CV and TV, further reinforcing the need for accurate diagnoses.

Study Details

Subjects in the multi-center, cross-sectional diagnostic accuracy study for the Aptima BV and Aptima CV/TV assays were at least 14 years old with symptoms of vaginitis such as abnormal vaginal discharge, vaginal odor, genital itching or irritation, pain or discomfort during sexual intercourse or urination, edema or erythema. They were enrolled at 21 U.S. sites, including clinical research centers and emergency medicine, family planning, public health, STI and family medicine/obstetric-gynecologic (OB-GYN) facilities between June and October 2018.

Patient- and clinician-collected vaginal swab samples obtained from women with symptoms of vaginitis were tested with the Aptima BV and Aptima CV/TV assays. The prevalence of infection was similar for clinician- and patient-collected samples: 49 percent for BV, 29 percent for CV due to the Candida species group, 4 percent for CV due to C. glabrata, and 10 percent for TV. Sensitivity and specificity estimates for the tests in clinician-collected samples were, respectively, 95.0 percent and 89.6 percent for BV, 91.7 percent and 85.8 percent for the Candida species group, 84.7 percent and 99.1 percent for C. glabrata, and 96.5 percent and 98.9 percent for TV. Sensitivity and specificity were similar in patient-collected samples.

Hologic offers 16 FDA-cleared assays on the Panther system that detect more than 20 pathogens, offering the only high-throughput molecular diagnostic platform in the U.S. to combine comprehensive sexual health, cervical health, viral load, respiratory testing and open channel functionality on a fully automated system.

For more information on the Aptima BV and Aptima CV/TV assays, visit http://www.hologic.com.

About Hologic

Hologic, Inc. is an innovative medical technology company primarily focused on improving womens health and well-being through early detection and treatment. For more information on Hologic, visit http://www.hologic.com.

Hologic Forward-Looking Statements

This press release may contain forward-looking information that involves risks and uncertainties, including statements about the use of Hologics diagnostic products. There can be no assurance these products will achieve the benefits described herein or that such benefits will be replicated in any particular manner with respect to an individual patient. The actual effect of the use of the products can only be determined on a case-by-case basis depending on the particular circumstances and patient in question. In addition, there can be no assurance that these products will be commercially successful or achieve any expected level of sales. Hologic expressly disclaims any obligation or undertaking to release publicly any updates or revisions to any such statements presented herein to reflect any change in expectations or any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statements are based.

Hologic, Aptima, Panther and The Science of Sure are registered trademarks of Hologic, Inc. in the United States and/or other countries.

Source: Hologic, Inc.

____________________

More:
Newly Published Research Shows that Hologic's Molecular Assays for Diagnosing Vaginitis are More Effective than Traditional Methods - Business Wire

Read the Rest...

Eight Illinois faculty members elected AAAS Fellows | Illinois – University of Illinois News

§ November 26th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Eight Illinois faculty members elected AAAS Fellows | Illinois – University of Illinois News

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Eight professors at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been elected 2019 Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Plant biology professor and researcher Elizabeth Lisa Ainsworth; mechanical science and engineering professor Andrew Alleyne; materials science and engineering professor David Cahill; chemistry professor Paul Hergenrother; evolution, ecology and behavior professor Andrew Suarez; and computer science professors Sheldon Jacobson, Klara Nahrstedt and Tao Xie are among the 443 people to be awarded the distinction of AAAS Fellow this year.

Elizabeth "Lisa" Ainsworth

Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

Edit embedded media in the Files Tab and re-insert as needed.

Ainsworth is the research leader of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Global Change and Photosynthesis Research Unit. Her research examines genetic variation in crop responses to air pollution and climate change. A key goal of her work is to maximize crop production in the future. She was the 2019 recipient of the National Academy of Sciences Prize in Food and Agricultural Research and a 2018 recipient of the Presidential Award from the Crop Sciences Society of America. She also is affiliated with the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology at the U. of I.

Alleyne is a Ralph and Catherine Fisher Professor of Engineering and is recognized for his contributions to the theory and practice of automatic control. His expertise spans precision motion control for advanced manufacturing as well as control of transient thermal systems. He is currently tackling the thermal and electrical challenges surrounding electrified mobility through the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center on Power Optimization for Electro Thermal Systems. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers. He serves on the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and the National Academies Board on Army Research and Development.

David Cahill

Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

Edit embedded media in the Files Tab and re-insert as needed.

Cahill is a Willett Professor of Engineering and was the department head of materials science and engineering from 2010-18. He is an expert on the concept of minimum thermal conductivity and transient optical measurement techniques. His research program focuses on developing a microscopic understanding of thermal transport at the nanoscale; the discovery of materials with enhanced thermal function; the interactions between phonons, electrons, photons and spin; and advancing fundamental understanding of interfaces between materials and water. Cahill is an American Physical Society fellow and received the 2018 Innovation in Materials Characterization Award of the Materials Research Society.

Paul Hergenrother

Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

Edit embedded media in the Files Tab and re-insert as needed.

Hergenrother is an expert in the molecular basis of disease and has distinguished himself by translating his most promising discoveries into real-world applications. He has made advances in the way new medicines are discovered and developed, using readily available natural products as the starting point for complex molecule synthesis. His discoveries impact not only basic scientific research but also the lives of cancer patients. Hergenrother received the 2017 American Chemical Society Sosnovsky Award for Cancer research. He also is affiliated with the IGB and the Carle Illinois College of Medicine at the U. of I.

Sheldon Jacobson

Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

Edit embedded media in the Files Tab and re-insert as needed.

Jacobson, a Founder Professor in Computer Science, applies his expertise in operations research and data science to topics that inform public policy. His research has produced data-driven analysis of elections, political redistricting, pediatric vaccines, cellphone use while driving, mass killing trends, and links between obesity and transportation. His seminal work on risk-based security provided the technical foundations that informed the design of TSA PreCheck. He also is known nationally for his work on bracketology the analysis of the NCAA mens basketball tournament and created the BracketOdds website. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2003. He also is affiliated with the Carle Illinois College of Medicine.

Klara Nahrstedt

Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

Edit embedded media in the Files Tab and re-insert as needed.

Nahrstedt, the Ralph and Catherine Fisher Professor of Computer Science and director of the Coordinated Science Laboratory, is an expert in multimedia systems and networks. Her expertise in dynamic soft-real-time CPU scheduling and energy-efficient operating systems for mobile multimedia devices is widely recognized in academia and industry. She is a member of the Academy of Sciences in Germany and belongs to the Excellence Commission appointed by the Joint Science Conference of the German Federal Government. Nahrstedt received the 2019 Drucker Award from the Grainger College of Engineering and also is affiliated with the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the U. of I. and the Carle Illinois College of Medicine.

Andrew Suarez

Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

Edit embedded media in the Files Tab and re-insert as needed.

Suarez, a professor of entomology and head of the department of evolution, ecology and behavior, is a leading figure in conservation and invasion biology. He is an expert on introduced ants, especially the globally invasive Argentine ant, Linepithema humile. His research on native populations of invasive species demonstrated the utility of a biogeographic approach to understanding invasion success, pioneering an approach that is considered the gold standard in the field. He also conducts research on trap-jaw ants, whose mandibles are among the fastest biological movements. Suarez is a recipient of the 2017 University of Illinois Campus Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. He also is affiliated with the IGB.

Tao Xie

Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

Edit embedded media in the Files Tab and re-insert as needed.

Xie is a Willett Faculty Scholar. His work in software engineering focuses on software testing, analytics and security; the intersection between software engineering and artificial intelligence; and educational software engineering. His expertise in these areas has earned him many honors, including being elected an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Fellow in 2018 and an Association for Computing Machinery Distinguished Scientist in 2015.

Founded in 1848, AAAS is the worlds largest general scientific society. Fellows are chosen by their peers for outstanding contribution to the field. The new Fellows will be honored at the 2020 AAAS annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

Continued here:
Eight Illinois faculty members elected AAAS Fellows | Illinois - University of Illinois News

Read the Rest...

A genetic finding may hold the secret to increased immunity and life expectancy – Industry Global News 24

§ November 26th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on A genetic finding may hold the secret to increased immunity and life expectancy – Industry Global News 24

Newsletter

Subscribe to update with our latest news.

Name

Email

Submit

Your email is safe with us. We won't spam.

Read the original post:
A genetic finding may hold the secret to increased immunity and life expectancy - Industry Global News 24

Read the Rest...

Father bedbound by Lyme disease is back on his feet due to a drug for alcoholism Yahoo Lifestyle – X Herald

§ November 26th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine § Tagged Comments Off on Father bedbound by Lyme disease is back on his feet due to a drug for alcoholism Yahoo Lifestyle – X Herald

Ciaran Hughes, 31, created steady torment, worked development and lost equalization in March.

A dad who was bedbound by Lyme ailment is at long last in a good place again because of a medication for liquor abuse.

Ciaran Hughes, 31, created consistent torment, toiled development and lost equalization in March while working in Indonesia.

Numerous tests both abroad and in his local Northern Ireland returned clear, including one for Lyme ailment.

Peruse MORE:Lyme ailment cases triple higher than recently evaluated

Urgent, Mr Hughes looked for private treatment. In spite of the fact that this prompted his determination, the recommended anti-infection agents neglected to facilitate his indications.

The dad of-two chose to bring matters into his very own hands. While investigating on the web, he went over a specialist in the US who treats patients with the liquor reliance tranquilize disulfiram.

Since forking out 66 for the medicine a month ago, Mr Hughes as of now feels more splendid and like an appropriate father to his young men once more.

In a good place again, Mr Hughes feels like a legitimate father to his children, matured seven and four months. [Photo: Supplied]

More

Mr Hughes, who works for a seaward oil organization, started to feel unwell 10 days after he accepts he was nibbled.

I was in steady agony, he revealed to Yahoo UK. My body felt overwhelming, my developments were exceptionally toiled and I lost my feeling of equalization.

Mr Hughes was tried for Lyme sickness while in Indonesia, which gave no indications for concern.

We cannot theorize why the test returned negative, Mr Hughes private surgeon Dr Josh Berkowitz, from theLyme Disease Clinic, disclosed to Yahoo UK.

It might be it was not done appropriately or it could be the Lyme contamination hadnt set off the insusceptible framework reaction adequately around then.

At the point when you test for a disease you are searching for the insusceptible framework response and markers, not simply the bug.

The Lyme living being is known to be great at stowing away and not provoking an insusceptible framework reaction, along these lines tests can return negative.

When home, Mr Hughes was alluded by his GP to a cardiologist when he created chest torment.

With tests again returning clear, things before long got ugly.

I was enduring nerve torment, deadness in my grasp, sticks and needles, fits in my arms and legs, and extremely solid migraines, Mr Hughes said.

Demanding something was genuinely off-base, he was alluded to a nervous system specialist, who again gave him the all-unmistakable.

To err on the side of caution, Mr Hughes was recommended anti-infection agents, in any case, the medications did little to facilitate his misery.

I was bedbound and incapable to do the least difficult undertakings, he said.

I lost enthusiasm for things around me, couldnt center or concentrate for any time allotment and was totally depleted.

Peruse MORE:What are the signs and indications of Lyme infection?

Persuaded he may have Lyme infection, Mr Hughes looked for private treatment at the Lyme Disease Clinic in August.

At this point his resistant framework had reacted to the contamination and delivered surrogate markers as a response to the disease, Dr Berkowitz said.

The surgeon recommended anti-toxins, which helped to some degree.

Persuaded a progressively powerful treatment was out there, Mr Hughes went over crafted by Dr Ken Liegner in New York.

I read preliminaries of disulfiram being utilized to treat Lyme malady are in the beginning periods and it doesnt work for everybody, Mr Hughes said.

Be that as it may, many patients are feeling better on it and I needed to give it a go.

Dr Berkowitz consented to endorse a low-portion of the medication, which is step by step being expanded.

Mr Hughes paid 66 for 100 tablets, which are relied upon to most recent two months.

Sick be straightforward, two days subsequent to increasing the portion I feel terrifying once more, as a greater amount of the illness in my body ceases to exist, he said.

In any case, at that point I return feeling good and more grounded each time.

Albeit still too sick to even think about working, Mr Hughes is no longer bedbound or pondering steady torment.

I feel more brilliant, my contemplations are clear, my vitality is returning, and Im physically functional at home, he said. I at long last feel like an appropriate father again to my young men.

To screen his advancement, Mr Hughes has blood, liver and kidney tests like clockwork, which are so far returning clear.

Not all patients build up the obvious pinpoint center rash around the tick nibble. [Photo: Getty]

More

Lyme infection isnt normal in the UK, influencing 2,000 to 3,000 individuals consistently in England and Wales,government insights appear.

Furthermore, in the US, around 30,000 cases arereported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention every year.

Manifestations will in general be dubious and influenza like, including exhaustion, fever and chills.

Also, not all build up the obvious bulls eye rash around the bite,Dr Paul Taylor, of Sunnybrook Hospital in California, composed on YourHealthMatters.

A postponement in conclusion can enable the microorganisms to penetrate nerve cells, the cerebrum, different organs, collagen and connective tissue, making it difficult to cleanse from the body, he included.

The persistent pathogen regularly likewise creates protection from anti-infection agents, with long periods of treatment being required.

Disulfiram was first proposed as a possibility for Lyme illness after the screening of 7,450 medication atoms recommended it was exceptionally dynamic against the microorganisms in the research center.

Dr Liegner treated three patients with backsliding contaminations with the medication, which at first disposed of the requirement for further antimicrobial treatment in two of them.

One proceeded to backslide, in any case, and required further treatment.

Albeit indistinct, Dr Liegner estimates disulfiram may influence microbial surface film adaptability and capacity.

It has additionally been appeared to have hostile to parasitic movement in the research center.

Peruse MORE:Can Lyme illness truly cause you to lose your voice?

I am mindfully hopeful about disulfiram, Dr Berkowitz said. It ought to be endorsed with incredible consideration and given to patients couple with the acknowledged conventions for treating Lyme ailment.

The NHS expresses a course of anti-infection agents is the go-to treatment for Lyme illness.

[Disulfiram] is certainly not a silver shot for the malady however it could demonstrate supportive in accelerating the recuperation of certain patients and boosting the advancement among those leveling in their treatment out of the blue, Dr Berkowitz said.

We realize disulfiram is a protected and endorsed medicate for liquor addiction yet need to get familiar with how and why it could assist individuals with battling Lyme malady.

Another hypothesis is the medication particle is littler than the anti-infection agents used to treat Lyme malady.

It might have the option to assault the microorganisms in tissues and cells at a more profound level, accordingly speeding recuperation, Dr Berkowitz said.

In contrast to anti-toxins, disulfiram can likewise infiltrate biofilms, which emerge when microscopic organisms put down roots on a surface.

This may empower the liquor abuse medication to arrive at microorganisms not open to anti-infection agents.

With regards to Lyme malady, Dr Berkowitz stresses anticipation is superior to fix. With no vaccine,Public Health England (PHE) claimsthe most ideal approach to maintain a strategic distance from disease is to evade ticks.

It prescribes strolling on obviously characterized ways and abstaining from brushing against vegetation whenever the situation allows.

PHE likewise exhorts wearing light attire to help detect any slithering ticks.

A creepy crawly repellent may help demoralize ticks, while long pants and sleeves can lessen the measure of uncovered skin the ticks could join to.

In the event that you detect a tick, utilize fine-tipped tweezers or a tick evacuation device, PHE prescribes.

Handle the bug as near the skin as could reasonably be expected, pulling upwards gradually and solidly.

Dr Berkowitz additionally suggests checking your pets for ticks after they have been outside.

Read more:
Father bedbound by Lyme disease is back on his feet due to a drug for alcoholism Yahoo Lifestyle - X Herald

Read the Rest...

« Older Entries Newer Entries »



Page 3«..2345..1020..»