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Magnetic hyperthermia as a potential trypanocidal therapy – Supplementary video B: 35510 – Video

§ November 1st, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Magnetic hyperthermia as a potential trypanocidal therapy – Supplementary video B: 35510 – Video


Magnetic hyperthermia as a potential trypanocidal therapy - Supplementary video B: 35510
Supplementary video B (cells with magnetic nanoparticles without magnetic field application) from original research "Application of magnetically induced hyperthermia in the model protozoan Crithidia fasciculata as a potential therapy against parasitic infections" published in the International Journal of Nanomedicine by V Grazu, AM Silber, M Moros, et al. Read the full paper here: http://www.dovepress.comFrom:dovepressViews:11 0ratingsTime:00:31More inScience Technology

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Aruna

§ November 1st, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Aruna


Aruna Hari Sharma from Arlanda to London Heathrow by SK 527 Flight Oct 10, 2012
Aruna Hari Sharma are invited to London, UK, House of Lords for Global Achiever Congress organized by NRI Welfare Society to commemorate Mahatma Gandhi Pravasi Gold Medal to distinguished Global Achiever based on their pioneer works in any field, science, Arts, Humanities or Social Service. Hari Sharma was choses for this prestigious award based on his contribution in Nanoneuroscience nanomedicine. For this purpose, Aruna Hari are flying to London Heathrow on Dec 10 from Arlanda to participate in House of Lords, Palace of Westminster, London, UK Function on 12th October 2012. In this video SK 527 Flight take them to London Heathrow from Arlanda.From:Hari SharmaViews:28 0ratingsTime:45:52More inTravel Events

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Aruna

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Novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system – Video Abstract: 36071 – Video

§ November 1st, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system – Video Abstract: 36071 – Video


Novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system - Video Abstract: 36071
Video abstract of original research "Development and characterization of a novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system for potential application in oral delivery of protein drugs" published in the International Journal of Nanomedicine by Hongwu Sun, Kaiyun Liu, Wei Liu, et al. Read the full paper here: http://www.dovepress.comFrom:dovepressViews:10 0ratingsTime:03:27More inScience Technology

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BIND Biosciences to Present at Lazard Capital Markets Healthcare Conference

§ November 1st, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on BIND Biosciences to Present at Lazard Capital Markets Healthcare Conference

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--

BIND Biosciences, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing a new class of highly selective targeted and programmable therapeutics called AccurinsTM, announced today that Andrew Hirsch, BINDs CFO, is scheduled to present at the Lazard Capital Markets 9th Annual Healthcare Conference at 9:00 a.m. ET on Wednesday, November 14, 2012, at the Pierre Hotel, New York.

About BIND Biosciences

BIND Biosciences is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing a new class of highly selective targeted and programmable therapeutics called AccurinsTM. BINDs Medicinal NanoengineeringTM platform enables the design, engineering and manufacturing of Accurins with unprecedented control over drug properties to maximize trafficking to disease sites, dramatically enhancing efficacy while minimizing toxicities.

BIND is developing a pipeline of novel Accurins that hold extraordinary potential to become best-in-class drugs and improve patient outcomes in the areas of oncology, inflammatory diseases and cardiovascular disorders. BIND's lead product candidate, BIND-014, is currently in Phase 1 clinical testing in cancer patients and is designed to selectively target a surface protein upregulated in a broad range of solid tumors. BIND also develops Accurins in collaboration with pharmaceutical and biotechnology partners to enable promising pipeline candidates to achieve their full potential and to utilize selective targeting to transform the performance of important existing drug products.

BIND is backed by leading investors, Polaris Venture Partners, Flagship Ventures, ARCH Venture Partners, NanoDimension, DHK Investments, EndeavourVision and Rusnano. BIND was founded on proprietary technology from the laboratories of two leaders in the field of nanomedicine, Professors Robert Langer, David H. Koch Institute Professor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Omid Farokhzad, Associate Professor of Harvard Medical School. For more information, please visit the company's web site at http://www.bindbio.com.

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Genetic Immunity Publishes the Technology Roadmap for the Cure of HIV

§ November 1st, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Genetic Immunity Publishes the Technology Roadmap for the Cure of HIV

BUDAPEST, HUNGARY--(Marketwire - Oct 22, 2012) - Genetic Immunity ( OTCBB : PWRV ), a leader in immunotherapy technology, announced the peer-reviewed publication on the Company's groundbreaking nanotechnology and details on its potential for the cure of HIV. The manuscript is entitled "Nanomedicine applications Towards the Cure of HIV" by J. Lisziewicz and E. R. Toke (http://www.nanomedjournal.com/article/S1549-9634(12)00287-0/abstract).

The Scientists of Genetic Immunity pioneered research for the cure of HIV: in 1999 they described in the New England Journal of Medicine the first patients whose immune system was boosted to control HIV after interruption of his daily drug treatment (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199905273402114). This observation inspired development of a new medicine called DermaVir that boosts the immune system to specifically recognize and kill HIV infected cells. Today, DermaVir is the most advanced nanomedicine developed for the cure of HIV.

"We have about 30 potent HIV drugs suppressing viral load, but we do not have any to eliminate the infected cells from the reservoirs. To cure HIV we need new drugs to activate these infected cells and to kill them. In our manuscript we described the new drugs that are needed and the strategy that will result in the cure of HIV. One of these new essential drugs for HIV eradication is DermaVir, our lead HIV-specific immunotherapeutic product. In contrast to the daily oral drugs, DermaVir is administered a few times a year with four patches. Our Clinical Trials have shows DermaVir to be as safe as a placebo and it induced long-lasting HIV-specific T cell production. Our GIEU006 Phase II trial demonstrated significant killing of HIV-infected cells, producing 70% viral load reduction compared to a placebo. Our results suggest that DermaVir provides the immunologic drug component towards the eradication of HIV," said Dr. Julianna Lisziewicz, CEO of Genetic Immunity.

Eradication of HIV is a difficult goal to achieve, because a reservoir of HIV is established soon after infection and it persists even after years of potent antiretroviral treatment. New drugs under development can activate dormant HIV and flush the virus from the reservoirs. However, activation is not enough, HIV-infected cells must be detected and killed by the immune system. In Hepatitis C, which is caused by a virus transmitted through the blood similarly to HIV, the cure rate is up to 75% because the use of drugs that suppress virus replication and induce the immune system to fight the virus. Up to now the cure of HIV has not been achieved with drugs that suppress the virus. Therefore, DermaVir will be required to induce the immune system to fight HIV and contribute to the cure of HIV/AIDS.

Genetic Immunity is a wholly owned subsidiary of Power of the Dream Ventures, Inc. ( OTCBB : PWRV ).

About Genetic Immunity

Genetic Immunity, a wholly owned subsidiary of Power of the Dream Ventures, Inc. ( OTCBB : PWRV ), is a clinical stage technology company committed to discovering, developing, manufacturing and commercializing a new class of immunotherapeutic biologic drugs for the treatment of viral infections, cancer and allergy. Our Langerhans cell targeting nanomedicines are exceptional in both safety and immune modulating activity boosting specific Th1-type central memory T cells. These are essential to eliminate infected cells or cancerous cells, and balance the immune reactivity in response to allergens.

In 1988 Drs. Lisziewicz and Lori founded Genetic Immunity in the US after they described the 1st patient whose immune system was boosted to control HIV after treatment interruption (Lisziewicz et al. New England Journal of Medicine 1999) that lead to the invention of DermaVir. The Company's innovative technology team directed by Dr. Lisziewicz, a champion of immune boosting therapies, is now headquartered in Budapest, Hungary. She has been invited into the Scientific Advisory Board of the HIV Cure Initiative led by Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, Nobel Prize Laureate for her HIV research in 2009. For more information please visit http://www.geneticimmunity.com

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Testosterone increases honesty, study suggests

§ October 21st, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Testosterone increases honesty, study suggests

ScienceDaily (Oct. 10, 2012) Testosterone is considered THE male hormone, standing for aggression and posturing. Researchers working with Dr. Armin Falk, an economist from the University of Bonn, have now demonstrated that this sex hormone surprisingly also fosters social behavior. In play situations, subjects who had received testosterone clearly lied less frequently than individuals who had only received a placebo.

The results have just been published in the Public Library of Science's international online journal PLoS ONE.

The hormone testosterone stands for typically male attributes -- it fosters the forming of the sexual characteristics, increases libido and muscle building. Women also have this sex hormone, but to a much lesser extent. "Testosterone has always been said to promote aggressive and risky behavior and posturing," reports Prof. Dr. Bernd Weber, a neuro-scientist from the Center for Economics and Neuroscience (CENS) at the University of Bonn. More recent studies indicate, however, that this sex hormone also fosters social behavior.

Cause-and-effect issues remains unresolved

"The disadvantage of many studies is, however, that they only correlate their subjects' testosterone level with their behavior," explains lead author Dr. Matthias Wibral, adding that this approach only reflects statistical links while not providing any insights into the causes for the behavior. "For testosterone does not only influence behavior; behavior, in turn, also influences hormone levels." Consequently, the CENS scientists were looking for an experimental approach that would also allow deducing cause and effect.

Bonn researchers using new approach

The scientists recruited a total of 91 healthy men for a behavioral experiment. Out of this group of subjects, 46 were treated with testosterone by applying it to the skin in gel form. On the following day, endocrinologists from the Bonn University Hospitals checked whether the blood testosterone levels were indeed higher in these subjects than in the placebo group. The other 45 test subjects only received a placebo gel. "Neither the subjects themselves nor the scientists performing the study knew who had received testosterone and who hadn't," reports Dr. Wibral. This was done to prevent behaviors from potentially being affected.

Games of dice with cheating option

This was followed by the behavioral experiments. The test subjects played a simple game of dice in separate booths. The higher their scores, the higher the amounts of money they received as a reward. "These experiments were designed such that the test subjects were able to lie," reports Prof. Weber. "Due to the separate booths, nobody knew whether they were entering their real scores into the computer, or higher ones in order to get more money." However, the scientists were able to determine later whether the various test subjects had cheated or not. "Statistically, the probability for all numbers on the dice to occur is identical," explains the neuroscientist. "So, if there are outliers in the higher numbers, this is a clear indication that subjects have been cheating."

Test subjects with higher testosterone levels lied less

Source:
http%3A//www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121010172212.htm

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Testosterone Trouble: Men Getting Their Mojo Back!

§ October 21st, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Testosterone Trouble: Men Getting Their Mojo Back!

ANDROPAUSE: Testosterone is a hormone produced primarily in the testicles and mens testosterone levels naturally decline as they become older. As this happens, the man may only experience a few symptoms from this lower testosterone level that they can attribute to their age. However, other individuals develop hypogonadism, a disease in which the body is unable to produce normal amounts of testosterone due to either a problem with the testicles or the pituitary gland that controls the testicles. Hypogonadism can cause all the symptoms associated with lower testosterone levels in men younger than would normally be seen. In the case of hypogonadism, testosterone therapy is suggested to help the individual reach a normal level for their age and to improve the symptoms. A simple blood test can determine is low testosterone is due to natural aging or a disease. It is important to note that some symptoms of low testosterone levels can also be a result of other lifestyle factors such as medication side effects, thyroid problems, depression, and excessive alcohol use. (Source: http://www.mayoclinic.com)

TESTOSTERONE TREATMENTS: Although testosterone levels naturally lower as men age, there is no evidence suggesting that older males need less of the hormone than their younger counterparts; some studies even suggest that since androgens induce their own receptors, tissues receiving inadequate amounts of testosterone are less receptive to the hormones effects than those more fully supplied. The testosterone therapies are not praised by everyone. Some physicians avoid treating older men with testosterone for fear that it may promote prostate cancer growth. While prostate cancer growth has not yet been definitely linked with testosterone therapy, other complications exist as well. Other issues include erythrocytosis, possible promulgation of sleep apnea, and a reduction of HDL cholesterol levels. (Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov)

ANDROGEL: YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED!

1. What are your thoughts on Androgel? Dr. Power: Androgel is a topical testosterone form that is an alternative to injectable testosterone. I prefer injectable testosterone because the dosing is more reliable and there is no testosterone transfer to women and children, but Androgel is a possible alternative for testosterone replacement.

2. Who is androgel for?

Dr. Power: Men with low testosterone.

3.What is considered a normal testosterone level? (what is the range between healthy levels and unhealthy levels). Dr. Power: The range for "normal" testosterone is very wide: around 250-1200ng/dL (nanograms per deciliter). Men at the lower end of this range; below 400 or 500, or frequently symptomatic but are typically denied treatment as long as their testosterone level is in the "normal" range. Some studies have shown increased risk of heart disease and cancer at levels below 350. Most men feel better and lose weight if levels are raised to the 800-900 range.

4. How is testosterone measured and what are the units used in measuring testosterone? Dr. Power: A blood test is the most accurate way to check testosterone levels. Both total and free testosterone should be checked.

(Source: Ivanhoe Broadcast News Interview with Dr. Karron Power, MD, MPH

founder of the Youth Renewal Center and creator of the Peak Performance for Men Program

Source:
http%3A//www.wftv.com/news/news/health-med-fit-science/testosterone-trouble-men-getting-their-mojo-back/nSZBP/

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Testosterone as a Truth Serum

§ October 21st, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Testosterone as a Truth Serum

/enn_original_news/article/45079

Testosterone is the number one male hormone. It is what is thought of when considering an individual's masculinity, and is normally associated with aggression. A new research study from the University of Bonn has also found a surprising quality that can be attributed to testosterone. It fosters social behavior. Individuals with increased levels of testosterone were shown to lie less frequently than their counterparts with a lower levels. In an incredible twist, the hormone known for increased libido and muscle building, risky behavior and macho posturing, is now also known for telling the truth.

Lead author, Dr. Matthias Wibral stated that previous studies on testosterone only correlated the hormone with the person's behavior. According to Wibral, this approach does not offer any insights into the causes for the behavior, stating, "For testosterone does not only influence behavior; behavior, in turn, also influences hormone levels."

The team of scientists from the University of Bonn Center for Economics and Neuroscience (CENS), set about to prove their theory through a behavioral experiment involving 91 healthy men. Of this group, 46 were treated with testosterone by applying it to the skin in a gel form. The others were given a placebo. Their hormone levels were checked the next day by endocrinologists.

Neither the participants nor the researchers were aware which were given the testosterone or the placebo in order to prevent their behaviors from being affected through that knowledge.

The participants than went through a series of behavioral experiments. In separate booths, the subjects played a simple game of dice. They were told that the higher their rolls, the more money they would receive.

"These experiments were designed such that the test subjects were able to lie," reports Prof. Weber. "Due to the separate booths, nobody knew whether they were entering their real scores into the computer, or higher ones in order to get more money." But the researchers were able to later tell if they had cheated or not.

Results: The subjects with the higher testosterone levels lied notably less than the untreated subjects. This contradicts the old orthodoxy which states that more testosterone results in anti-social behavior.

The reason for this, the researchers speculate, is that testosterone bolsters pride in oneself. That pride than fosters the need to develop a positive self-image. Lying most definitely does not improve one's self worth.

Source:
http%3A//www.enn.com/enn_original_news/article/45079

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Does testosterone make men more honest?

§ October 21st, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Does testosterone make men more honest?

Heres a strange one: A study on testosterone published Oct. 10 in the online journal PLOS ONE concludes that testosterone administration can increase honesty in men. The article on the study, entitled Testosterone Administration Reduces Lying In Men, was authored by Dr. Matthias Wibral and associates from University of Bonn in Germany.

Testosterone, the most abundant male sex hormone, is associated with sex drive, skin health, lean muscle mass and aggression. Higher testosterone levels are associated with interpersonal and social dominance, status-seeking, physical dynamism and in extreme cases, greater violence.

In the German study, the various researchers designed a simple test for honesty. They told participants to roll a six-sided dice in private and to report the result on a computer. The study participants were told ahead of time that the higher the number they rolled, the more money they would be given. A 1 would yield them one euro, whereas a 5 would yield them five euros. In every case, the study subject could make more money without fear of being caught, simply by claiming to have rolled a higher number.

In the two day study, 91 men were enrolled in the double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment, which was conducted at the Institute for Empirical Research in Economics at the University of Bonn. On the first day, one group received a transdermal testosterone gel, while the other group received a placebo gel. The testosterone was allowed to be absorbed for approximately 21 hours before the second part of the study commenced.

On the second day of the study, participants returned to the BonEcon lab test site, where they were invited to roll dice in privacy, report their numbers and collect their money. At no time were the study designers able to see the numbers rolled. The entire event was conducted in secure cubicles. After the rolling of dice, participants were given a basic personality test and had their blood sampled for testosterone levels. They were each paid the amount they clamed for rolling dice. Additionally, every participant was paid a flat 40 euros for their time.

Half of the men in the study showed high testosterone levels, while the other half had more normal levels. The study scientists, who did not know who had or had not received testosterone gel, correlated winnings and levels of the hormone in the study subjects. Their sampling showed that the men with the higher testosterone levels had claimed lower winnings overall. Follow-up showed that those men had received the real hormone gel. Conversely, the men who received the placebo gel claimed more high numbers rolled.

The cleverly designed study demonstrated that at least in this instance, administration of testosterone gel resulted in more honest reporting of dice rolling results, and lower earnings. In effect, the testosterone made men more honest.

Truth-telling is widely considered essential to a healthy and functional society. Yet people lie all the time, creating personal, business and social disturbances. Lying can result in devastating losses of relationship, prestige, money and social status. Any condition, agent or treatment that might promote greater honesty is of interest to social scientists. In the study performed in Bonn, researchers concluded that at least in this case, testosterone proves to be somewhat of a truth serum. Honestly.

Chris Kilham is a medicine hunter who researches natural remedies all over the world, from the Amazon to Siberia. He teaches ethnobotany at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he is Explorer In Residence. Chris advises herbal, cosmetic and pharmaceutical companies and is a regular guest on radio and TV programs worldwide. His field research is largely sponsored by Naturex of Avignon, France. Read more atwww.MedicineHunter.com.

Source:
http%3A//www.foxnews.com/health/2012/10/16/does-testosterone-make-men-more-honest/

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Does Testosterone Get a Bad Rap?

§ October 21st, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Does Testosterone Get a Bad Rap?

Testosterone, the bad boy among sex hormones, has a sweet side. Researchers in Germany report they have found that the stuff that makes men aggressive and confrontational also makes them less likely to lie.

The surprising discovery flies in the face of all that we have been told about testosterone for the past few decades. It's why a guy is more likely than a gal to punch someone out in an effort to prove himself manly, or the baddest dude in the bar. Women have testosterone too, but not nearly as much as men do.

Recently, however, scientists have challenged the view that the hormone is the root of all evil. No one is saying it doesn't play a major role in male sexuality. But a number of scholars now think that's not all there is to the story.

"Popular perceptions of the effect of testosterone on 'manly' behavior are inaccurate," Pennsylvania State University researchers concluded in a recent study. "We need to move away from such simplistic notions by treating testosterone as one component along with other physiological, psychological and sociological variables in interactive and reciprocal models of behavior."

Cavan Images/Getty Images

In other words, there's a lot more going on here than one hormone making guys act like jerks in an effort to impress the ladies.

Much of the misperception probably lies in the fact that much of what we thought we knew about testosterone came from animal studies. Castrated rats, for example, became meek when deprived of the hormone. But when scientists gave them a shot of testosterone, they were ready to fight.

But there's a lot of difference between humans and rats. As scientists are now pointing out, the human social system is a very complex matrix of interactions and reactions, quite unlike the world of the rat.

Researchers at the University of Bonn have added significantly to the changing view of testosterone by carrying out a clever experiment to see how the hormone affects honesty. According to the old image, you would think men would be willing to lie more while cruising on an enhanced level of testosterone if it proved rewarding. But that turned out not to be the case.

The researchers recruited 91 young men for a two-day experiment. On the first day, each participant had gel containing testosterone rubbed on his upper arm. About 24 hours later, after the hormone had enough time to be absorbed by the body, the men returned to the lab. About half the participants had received a placebo, not testosterone.

Source:
http%3A//abcnews.go.com/Technology/testosterone-male-hormone-makes-guys-tough-makes-honest/story%3Fid=17493592

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More Testosterone, Less Deceit?

§ October 21st, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on More Testosterone, Less Deceit?

TUESDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Testosterone, commonly thought of as the male sex hormone, seems to promote honesty, a new study suggests.

Testosterone also is naturally found in women but at lower levels than in men, and is typically associated with macho attributes such as aggression and risky behavior. However, recent research indicates that the hormone also encourages social behavior.

In the new study, German researchers led by Dr. Matthias Wibral of the University of Bonn department of economics applied a testosterone gel to the skin of 46 men to boost their levels of the hormone and an inactive placebo gel to the skin of 45 other men. Neither the men, nor the researchers, knew which gel was applied to which study participants.

All of the men then played games of dice where they could win money. The higher their scores, the more money they received.

The researchers structured the games so that the men had opportunities to lie about their scores. The men played the games alone in separate booths and entered their scores on a computer.

But the researchers knew if the men cheated and found that men with the higher levels of testosterone lied less often than the other men.

The results challenge the belief that testosterone effects are limited to promoting antisocial behavior, the study authors said. They believe, instead, that testosterone may increase pride and the need to develop a positive self-image.

And the small financial gains the men could obtain through lying in this study "were not a sufficient incentive to jeopardize one's feeling of self-worth," study co-author Armin Falk, an economist, suggested in a university news release.

The study was published online Oct. 10 in the journal PLoS One.

-- Robert Preidt

Source:
http%3A//www.medicinenet.com/guide.asp%3Fs=rss%26k=DailyHealth%26a=164039

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Testosterone increases honesty

§ October 21st, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Testosterone increases honesty

Public release date: 10-Oct-2012 [ | E-mail | Share ]

Contact: Prof. Dr. Armin Falk armin.falk@uni-bonn.de 0049-228-738-294 University of Bonn

Testosterone is considered THE male hormone, standing for aggression and posturing. Researchers around Prof. Dr. Armin Falk, an economist from the University of Bonn, have now been able to demonstrate that this sex hormone surprisingly also fosters social behavior. In play situations, subjects who had received testosterone clearly lied less frequently than individuals who had only received a placebo. The results have just been published in the Public Library of Science's international online journal "PLoS ONE."

The hormone testosterone stands for typically male attributes it fosters the forming of the sexual characteristics, increases libido and muscle building. Women also have this sex hormone, but to a much lesser extent. "Testosterone has always been said to promote aggressive and risky behavior and posturing," reports Prof. Dr. Bernd Weber, a neuro-scientist from the Center for Economics and Neuroscience (CENS) at the University of Bonn. More recent studies indicate, however, that this sex hormone also fosters social behavior.

Cause-and-effect issues remains unresolved

"The disadvantage of many studies is, however, that they only correlate their subjects' testosterone level with their behavior," explains lead author Dr. Matthias Wibral, adding that this approach only reflects statistical links while not providing any insights into the causes for the behavior. "For testosterone does not only influence behavior; behavior, in turn, also influences hormone levels." Consequently, the CENS scientists were looking for an experimental approach that would also allow deducing cause and effect.

Bonn researchers using new approach

The scientists recruited a total of 91 healthy men for a behavioral experiment. Out of this group of subjects, 46 were treated with testosterone by applying it to the skin in gel form. On the following day, endocrinologists from the Bonn University Hospitals checked whether the blood testosterone levels were indeed higher in these subjects than in the placebo group. The other 45 test subjects only received a placebo gel. "Neither the subjects themselves nor the scientists performing the study knew who had received testosterone and who hadn't," reports Dr. Wibral. This was done to prevent behaviors from potentially being affected.

Games of dice with cheating option

This was followed by the behavioral experiments. The test subjects played a simple game of dice in separate booths. The higher their scores, the higher the amounts of money they received as a reward. "These experiments were designed such that the test subjects were able to lie," reports Prof. Weber. "Due to the separate booths, nobody knew whether they were entering their real scores into the computer, or higher ones in order to get more money." However, the scientists were able to determine later whether the various test subjects had cheated or not. "Statistically, the probability for all numbers on the dice to occur is identical," explains the neuroscientist. "So, if there are outliers in the higher numbers, this is a clear indication that subjects have been cheating."

Source:
http%3A//www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-10/uob-tih101012.php

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Testosterone Seems to Boost Honesty

§ October 21st, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Testosterone Seems to Boost Honesty

By Janice Wood Associate News Editor Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on October 11, 2012

New research ties a higher level of testosterone to a higher level of honesty.

In experiments, researchers from the University of Bonn showed that men who had received a dose of testosterone clearly lied less frequently than men who had received a placebo.

The scientists recruited 91 healthy men and about half, or 46, were treated with testosterone by applying it to the skin in gel form. On the following day, endocrinologists from the Bonn University Hospitals checked whether the blood testosterone levels were higher in these subjects than in the placebo group.

The other 45 test subjects received a placebo gel. Neither the subjects or the scientists knew who had received the testosterone, noted lead author Dr. Matthias Wibral.

The test subjects then played a simple game of dice in separate booths. The higher their scores, the higher the amounts of money they received as a reward.

These experiments were designed such that the test subjects were able to lie, said Dr. Bernd Weber, a neuroscientist from the Center for Economics and Neuroscience (CENS) at the University of Bonn. Due to the separate booths, nobody knew whether they were entering their real scores into the computer, or higher ones in order to get more money.

However, the scientists were able to determine later whether the test subjects had cheated or not.

Statistically, the probability for all numbers on the dice to occur is identical, Weber said, so, if there are outliers in the higher numbers, this is a clear indication that subjects have been cheating.

The researchers compared the results from the testosterone group to those from the control group. This showed that the test subjects with the higher testosterone levels had clearly lied less frequently than untreated test subjects, reported economist Dr. Armin Falk, who is one of the CENS co-directors. This result clearly contradicts the one-dimensional approach that testosterone results in anti-social behavior.

Source:
http%3A//psychcentral.com/news/2012/10/11/testosterone-seems-to-boost-honesty/45937.html

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New hope for leukemia patients

§ October 16th, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on New hope for leukemia patients

Kochi, Oct 15 (UNI)

Amrita Centre for Nanosciences and Molecular Medicine, part of the Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre has claimed to have discovered a potential cure for drug resistant leukemia.

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) responds well to a drug named 'Imatinib', however, when drug resistance sets in, which is in about 20-25 per cent of the cases, the patients has little chance of survival, a press release said here today.

Drug resistance was due to certain point mutations in the leukemia cells as a result of which the cells find an alternative pathway for survival, preventing the drug from killing the cancer cells, it said.

The Centre has developed a nanomedicine which had shown significant ability to kill the drug reststant cancer cells.

The nanomedicine was developed over the past three years and has shown success in in-vitro (or cell line based) studies, it added.

The Centre was now conducting animal trials or pre-clinical studies of the drug, it said, adding that it is expected that if pre-clinical trials are successful the new nano medicine can be submitted for clinical trial after approval from the government.

This was the first such discovery in the world of nanomedicine that effectively solves the problem of severe drug resistance in blood cancers.

The senior scientists involved in the research and development was Dr Manzoor Koyakutty, Professor and Dr Shantikumar Nair, Centre Director and Dean of Research.

Clinicians from the hospital who are involved in the research are Dr Pavithran, Dr Neeraj and Dr Prabhu. The PhD student who has worked on this as part of her PhD thesis is Archana Ratnakumari, it added.

More here:
New hope for leukemia patients

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pSivida CEO to Discuss Sustained Delivery and Nanotechnology in Ophthalmology at Upcoming Massachusetts Biotechnology …

§ October 16th, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on pSivida CEO to Discuss Sustained Delivery and Nanotechnology in Ophthalmology at Upcoming Massachusetts Biotechnology …

WATERTOWN, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--

pSivida Corp. (PSDV)(PVA.AX), a leader in developing sustained release, drug delivery products for treatment of back-of-the-eye diseases, today announced that its President and CEO, Dr. Paul Ashton, will discuss Cross Fertilization: Sustained Delivery and Nanotechnology in Ophthalmology at an upcoming Formulation and Drug Delivery Committee Meeting of the Massachusetts Biotechnology Council on Wednesday, October 17.

Dr. Ashtons presentation will focus on delivery of peptides and proteins, primarily in ophthalmology. Currently the eye space is dominated by two anti-VEGF proteins, Roche/Genentechs Lucentis and Regenerons Eyelea. Both of these drugs must be repeatedly injected directly into the eye, typically every one to two months. The development of a sustained release protein delivery system would offer a significant advantage in ophthalmology, said Dr. Paul Ashton, president and chief executive officer of pSivida. pSivida is presently developing such a delivery system, called Tethadur, which is based on the companys BioSilicon technology platform. This delivery system could also have a significant clinical impact outside of ophthalmology for diseases requiring systemic administration, particularly in the BioSimilars era.

Tethadur is designed to provide sustained delivery of biologic molecules, including proteins, antibodies and peptides. It is composed of nanostructured porous material, in which the sizes of the pores are manufactured to accommodate specific protein, peptide or antibody molecules. Very simply put, Tethadur can be viewed as a high tech egg box where each protein molecule is contained in its own spot until it is released, said Dr. Ashton. We are able to control the release rate of a drug by controlling the pore size of the Tethadur delivery material.

pSivida recently announced a technology evaluation agreement with a leading global biopharmaceutical company to evaluate Tethadur in the field of ophthalmology. Although we are at the very early stages with Tethadur, the potential improvement in patient care and clinical outcomes could be highly significant, Dr. Ashton stated. We have already been successful in this field, working with partners we have developed three of the four sustained release devices for ophthalmic drugs approved in either the US or the EU.

The Massachusetts Biotechnology Council (MassBio), a not-for-profit organization that represents and provides services and support for the Massachusetts biotechnology industry, is the nations oldest biotechnology trade association. Founded in 1985, MassBio is committed to advancing the development of critical new science, technology and medicines that benefit people worldwide.

About pSivida Corporation

pSivida Corp., headquartered in Watertown, MA, develops tiny, sustained release, drug delivery products designed to deliver drugs at a controlled and steady rate for months or years. pSivida is currently focused on treatment of chronic diseases of the back of the eye utilizing its core technology systems, Durasert and BioSilicon. The injectable, sustained release micro-insert ILUVIEN for the treatment of chronic Diabetic Macular Edema (DME), licensed to Alimera Sciences, Inc., has received marketing authorization in Austria, France, Germany, Portugal and the U.K. and is awaiting authorization in Italy and Spain. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared pSividas Investigational New Drug application (IND) to treat posterior uveitis with the same micro-insert. An investigator-sponsored clinical trial is ongoing for an injectable, bioerodible micro insert to treat glaucoma and ocular hypertension. pSividas two FDA-approved products, Retisert and Vitrasert, are implants that provide long-term, sustained drug delivery to treat two other chronic diseases of the retina.

SAFE HARBOR STATEMENTS UNDER THE PRIVATE SECURITIES LITIGATION REFORM ACT OF 1995: Various statements made in this release are forward-looking, and are inherently subject to risks, uncertainties and potentially inaccurate assumptions. All statements that address activities, events or developments that we intend, expect of believe may occur in the future are forward-looking statements. The following are some of the factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the anticipated results or other expectations expressed, anticipated or implied in our forward-looking statements: uncertainty as to the efficacy, risk/benefit profile and side effects of the posterior uveitis product candidate; uncertainties with respect to Alimeras ability to commercialize ILUVIEN for DME in the EU; no assurance that Alimera will resubmit its application or be able to demonstrate to the FDA that the benefits outweigh the risks of ILUVIEN for DME using data from their two previously completed pivotal Phase III clinical trials (FAME Study), that additional clinical trials will not be required, that the population of chronic DME patients will be acceptable to the FDA or that Alimera will be able to obtain regulatory approval for ILUVIEN for DME in the U.S.; the timing and conditions for additional regulatory approvals are subject to decisions by regulators; necessity to raise additional capital to fully finance Phase III posterior uveitis trials as well as other working capital needs; ability to obtain additional capital; ability to initiate and complete clinical trials and obtain regulatory approval of product candidates; adverse side effects; Alimeras ability to successfully obtain regulatory approval of and commercialize ILUVIEN for DME in the EU; actions with respect to regulatory approval of ILUVIEN for DME in the U.S.; ability to attain profitability; initiation of Latanoprost Product trials and exercise by Pfizer, Inc. of the Latanoprost Product option; uncertainties with respect to pre-clinical products using Tethadur and BioSilicon; further impairment of intangible assets; fluctuations in operating results; decline in royalty revenues; ability to find partners to develop and market products; termination of license agreements; competition; market acceptance of products and product candidates; reduction in use of products as a result of future guidelines, recommendation or studies; ability to protect intellectual property and avoid infringement of others intellectual property; retention of key personnel; product liability; consolidation in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries; compliance with environmental laws; manufacturing risks; risks and costs of international business operations; credit and financial market conditions; legislative or regulatory changes; volatility of stock price; possible dilution; possible influence by Pfizer; absence of dividends; and other factors described in our filings with the SEC. Given these uncertainties, readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements. Our forward-looking statements speak only as of the dates on which they are made. We do not undertake any obligation to publicly update or revise our forward-looking statements even if experience or future changes makes it clear that any projected results expressed or implied in such statements will not be realized.

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pSivida CEO to Discuss Sustained Delivery and Nanotechnology in Ophthalmology at Upcoming Massachusetts Biotechnology ...

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10/11/2012 10:05 JAPAN Nobel Prize for Yamanaka, scientific research and ethics must go hand in hand

§ October 14th, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on 10/11/2012 10:05 JAPAN Nobel Prize for Yamanaka, scientific research and ethics must go hand in hand

10/11/2012 10:05 JAPAN Nobel Prize for Yamanaka, scientific research and ethics must go hand in hand by Pino Cazzaniga Research on iPS (induced pluripotent stem cells) can produce stem cells from adult cells, for use in regenerative medicine. Shinya Yamanakas discovery reveals that research on embryonic stem cells is unnecessary, saving the lives of many embryos. The Japanese researcher has searched for new ways driven by ethical question.

Tokyo (AsiaNews) - Shinya Yamanaka, fresh from the Nobel Prize for medicine, states that science and ethics must go hand in hand. Interviewed by the Mainichi Shimbun after the award, he said: "I would like to invite ethical experts as teachers at my laboratory and work to guide iPS [induced pluripotent stem] cell research from that direction as well. The work of a scientific researcher is just one part of the equation. "

Yamanaka, 50, found that adult cells can be transformed into cells in their infancy, stem cells (iPS), which are, so to speak, the raw material for the reconstruction of tissue irreparably damaged by disease. For regenerative medicine the implications of Yamanaka's discovery are obvious. Adult skin cells can for example be reprogrammed and transformed into any other cell that is desired: from the skin to the brain, from the skin to the heart, from the skin to elements that produce insulin.

"Their discovery - says the statement of the jury that awarded him the Nobel Prize on October 8 - has revolutionized our understanding of how cells and organisms develop. Through the programming of human cells, scientists have created new opportunities for the study of diseases and development of methods for the diagnosis and therapy ".

These "opportunities" are not only "scientific", but also "ethical". Much of the scientific research and global investment is in fact launched to design and produce stem cells from embryos, arriving at the point of manipulating and destroying them, facing scientists with enormous ethical problems.

" Ethics are really difficult - Yamanaka explainsto Mainichi - In the United States I began work on mouse experiments, and when I returned to Japan I learned that human embryonic stem cells had been created. I was happy that they would contribute to medical science, but I faced an ethical issue. I started iPS cell research as a way to do good things as a researcher, and I wanted to do what I could to expand the merits of embryonic stem cells. If we make sperm or eggs from iPS cells, however, it leads to the creation of new life, so the work I did on iPS cells led to an ethical problem. If we don't prepare debates for ethical problems in advance, technology will proceed ahead faster than we think.. "

The "ethical question" Yamanaka pushed to find a way to "not keep destroying embryos for our research."

Speaking with his co-workers at the University of Kyoto, immediately after receiving the award, Yamanaka showed dedication and modesty.

"Now - he said - I strongly feel a sense of gratitude and responsibility" gratitude for family and friends who have supported him in a demanding journey of discovery that lasted decades; responsibility for a discovery that gives hope to millions of patients. Now iPS cells can grow into any tissue of the human body allowing regeneration of parts so far irretrievably lost due to illness.

Source:
http%3A//www.asianews.it/news-en/Nobel-Prize-for-Yamanaka,-scientific-research-and-ethics-must-go-hand-in-hand-26054.html

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Stem-cell transplant claims debunked

§ October 14th, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Stem-cell transplant claims debunked

Hisashi Moriguchi presented his work at the New York Stem Cell Foundation meeting this week.

AP/Press Association

From the beginning, it seemed too good to be true. Days after Kyoto University biologist Shinya Yamanaka won a Nobel prize for his 2006 discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells (see 'Cell rewind wins medicine Nobel'), Hisashi Moriguchi a visiting researcher at the University of Tokyo claimed to have modified that technology to treat a person with terminal heart failure. Eight months after surgical treatment in February, said a front-page splash in the Japanese newspaper Yomiuri Shimbun yesterday, the patient was healthy.

But after being alerted to the story by Nature, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), where Moriguchi claimed to have done the work, denied that the procedure had taken place. No clinical trials related to Dr Moriguchi's work have been approved by institutional review boards at either Harvard University or MGH, wrote David Cameron, a spokesman for Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts. The work he is reporting was not done at MGH, says Ryan Donovan, a public-affairs official at MGH, also in Boston.

A video clip posted online by the Nippon News Network and subsequently removed showed Moriguchi presenting his research at the New York Stem Cell Foundation meeting this week.

If true, Moriguchis feat would have catapulted iPS cells into use in a wide range of clinical situations, years ahead of most specialists' predictions. I hope this therapy is realized in Japan as soon as possible, the head of a Tokyo-based organization devoted to helping children with heart problems told Yomiuri Shimbun.

But there were reasons to be suspicious. Moriguchi said he had invented a method to reprogram cells using just two chemicals: microRNA-145 inhibitor and TGF- ligand1. But Hiromitsu Nakauchi, a stem-cell researcher at the University of Tokyo, says that he has never heard of success with that method. He adds that he had also never heard of Moriguchi before this week.

Moriguchi also said that the cells could be differentiated into cardiac cells using a 'supercooling' method that he had invented. Thats another weird thing, says Nakauchi.

The article in which Moriguchi presented his two-chemical method, published in a book1 describing advances in stem-cell research, includes paragraphs copied almost verbatim from other papers. The section headed 2.3 Western blotting, for example, is identical to a passage from a 2007 paper by Yamanaka2. Section 2.1.1, in which Moriguchi describes human liver biopsies, matches the number of patients and timing of specimen extractions described in an earlier article3, although the name of the institution has been changed.

When contacted by Nature, Moriguchi stood by his publication. We are all doing similar things so it makes sense that wed use similar words, he says. He did admit to using other papers as reference.

Source:
http%3A//www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature.2012.11584

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Riken to test iPS cells in human trial

§ October 14th, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Riken to test iPS cells in human trial

Friday, Oct. 12, 2012

Stem cells derived from a mouse's skin won Shinya Yamanaka the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine on Monday. Now researchers in Japan are seeking to use his pioneering technology for an even greater prize: restoring sight.

Scientists at the Riken Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe plan to use induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in a human trial using patients with macular degeneration, a disease in which the retina becomes damaged and results in loss of vision, Yamanaka, a Kyoto University professor, told reporters the same day in San Francisco.

Companies including Pfizer Inc. are already planning trials of stem cells derived from human embryos, but Riken's will be the first to use a technology that mimics the power of embryonic cells while avoiding the ethical controversy that accompanies them.

"The work in that area looks very encouraging," John B. Gurdon, 79, a professor at the University of Cambridge who shared this year's Nobel Prize with Yamanaka, said in an interview in London.

Yamanaka and Gurdon split the 8 million Swedish kronor (about 94 million) award for experiments 50 years apart demonstrating that mature cells in latent form retain all of the DNA they had as immature stem cells, and that they can be returned to that potent state.

Their findings offer the potential for a new generation of therapies against hard-to-treat diseases like macular degeneration.

In a study published in 1962, Gurdon took a cell from a tadpole's gut, extracted the nucleus and inserted it into the egg cell of an adult frog whose own nucleus had been removed. The reprogrammed egg cell developed into a tadpole with the genetic characteristics of the original tadpole, and subsequent trials yielded adult frogs.

Yamanaka, 50, built on Gurdon's work by adding four genes to a skin cell from a mouse, returning it to its immature state as a stem cell with the potential to become any cell in the body.

He dubbed them induced pluripotent stem cells.

Source:
http%3A//www.japantimes.co.jp/rss/nn20121012f3.html

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Analysis: Reprogrammed cells open new medical window

§ October 14th, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Analysis: Reprogrammed cells open new medical window

LONDON (Reuters) - The Nobel Prize-winning discovery of how to reprogram ordinary cells to behave like embryonic stem cells offers a way to skirt around ethical problems with human embryos, but safety concerns make their future use in treating disease uncertain.

While researchers have already applied the scientific breakthroughs of Britain's John Gurdon and Japan's Shinya Yamanaka to study how diseases develop, making such cells into new treatments will involve a lot more checks.

Stem cells act as the body's master cells, providing the source material for all other cells. They could transform medicine by regenerating tissue for diseases ranging from blindness to Parkinson's disease.

Creating embryo-like stem cells without destroying embryos gets round a key controversy by avoiding the need to process embryos left over at fertility clinics - a system that has led to political objections in the United States and elsewhere.

Reprogrammed cells - known as induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells - offer an ethically neutral alternative. They have been a source of intense research since Yamanaka discovered their potential in 2006, building on work that Gurdon did in frogs and tadpoles 40 years earlier.

SAFETY CONCERNS

Recently, however, different research groups have noticed problems with iPS cells, suggesting they may not be as good as embryonic ones. In one study, iPS cells died more quickly and another found multiple genetic mutations, raising concerns that they could cause tumors.

Despite this, Japanese researchers hope to test iPS cells in clinical trials for a form of blindness as early as next year - catching up with recent successful eye trials using embryonic stem cells.

Researchers in the West are generally more wary.

"There is a bit of a divergence between Japan and the rest of the world on this," Chris Mason, professor of regenerative medicine at University College London, told Reuters.

Source:
http://news.yahoo.com/analysis-reprogrammed-cells-open-medical-window-150024485.html;_ylt=A2KJ3CXn33pQs2gAze3_wgt.

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Read in

§ October 14th, 2012 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Read in

TOKYO: Shinya Yamanaka, fresh from the Nobel Prize for medicine, states that science and ethics must go hand in hand. Interviewed by the Mainichi Shimbun after the award, he said: "I would like to invite ethical experts as teachers at my laboratory and work to guide iPS [induced pluripotent stem] cell research from that direction as well. The work of a scientific researcher is just one part of the equation. "

Yamanaka, 50, found that adult cells can be transformed into cells in their infancy, stem cells (iPS), which are, so to speak, the raw material for the reconstruction of tissue irreparably damaged by disease. For regenerative medicine the implications of Yamanaka's discovery are obvious. Adult skin cells can for example be reprogrammed and transformed into any other cell that is desired: from the skin to the brain, from the skin to the heart, from the skin to elements that produce insulin.

"Their discovery - says the statement of the jury that awarded him the Nobel Prize on October 8 - has revolutionized our understanding of how cells and organisms develop. Through the programming of human cells, scientists have created new opportunities for the study of diseases and development of methods for the diagnosis and therapy ".

These "opportunities" are not only "scientific", but also "ethical". Much of the scientific research and global investment is in fact launched to design and produce stem cells from embryos, arriving at the point of manipulating and destroying them, facing scientists with enormous ethical problems.

" Ethics are really difficult - Yamanaka explainsto Mainichi - In the United States I began work on mouse experiments, and when I returned to Japan I learned that human embryonic stem cells had been created. I was happy that they would contribute to medical science, but I faced an ethical issue. I started iPS cell research as a way to do good things as a researcher, and I wanted to do what I could to expand the merits of embryonic stem cells. If we make sperm or eggs from iPS cells, however, it leads to the creation of new life, so the work I did on iPS cells led to an ethical problem. If we don't prepare debates for ethical problems in advance, technology will proceed ahead faster than we think.. "

The "ethical question" Yamanaka pushed to find a way to "not keep destroying embryos for our research."

Speaking with his co-workers at the University of Kyoto, immediately after receiving the award, Yamanaka showed dedication and modesty.

"Now - he said - I strongly feel a sense of gratitude and responsibility" gratitude for family and friends who have supported him in a demanding journey of discovery that lasted decades; responsibility for a discovery that gives hope to millions of patients. Now iPS cells can grow into any tissue of the human body allowing regeneration of parts so far irretrievably lost due to illness.

His modesty also led him to warn against excessive hopes. To a journalist who asked him for a message to patients and young researchers awaiting the results of his research heresponded: "The iPS cells are also known as versatile cells, and the technology may be giving the false impression to patients that they could be cured any day now. It will still take five or 10 years of research before the technology is feasible. There are over 200 researchers at my laboratory, and I want patients to not give up hope"

"Dozens of times - he continued - I tried to get some results and I have often failed in the experiments .... Many times I was tempted to give up or cry. Without the support of my family, I could not have continued this search. From now on I will be facing the moment of truth. I would like to return to my laboratory as quickly as possible. "

Source:
http%3A//www.heraldmalaysia.com/news/Nobel-Prize-for-Yamanaka,-scientific-research-and-ethics-must-go-hand-in-hand-13372-10-1.html

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