Microscopic colitis – Diagnosis and treatment – Mayo Clinic

§ September 14th, 2019 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Microscopic colitis – Diagnosis and treatment – Mayo Clinic

Diagnosis

A complete medical history and physical examination can help determine whether other conditions, such as celiac disease, may be contributing to your diarrhea.

Your doctor will also ask about any medications you are taking particularly aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others), naproxen sodium (Aleve), proton pump inhibitors, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) which may increase your risk of microscopic colitis.

To help confirm a diagnosis of microscopic colitis, you may have one or more of the following tests and procedures:

Flexible sigmoidoscopy. This procedure is similar to a colonoscopy, but rather than viewing the entire colon, a flexible sigmoidoscopy allows your doctor to view the inside of the rectum and most of the sigmoid colon about the last 2 feet (61 centimeters) of the large intestine.

The doctor uses a slender, flexible, lighted tube (sigmoidoscope) to examine the intestinal lining. A tissue sample can be taken through the scope during the exam.

Because intestinal issues often appear normal in microscopic colitis, a definite diagnosis of microscopic colitis requires a colon tissue sample (biopsy) obtained during a colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy. In both subtypes of microscopic colitis, cells in colon tissue have a distinct appearance under the microscope, so the diagnosis is definite.

In addition to a colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy, you may have one or more of these tests to rule out other causes for your symptoms.

Microscopic colitis may get better on its own. But when symptoms persist or are severe, you may need treatment to relieve them. Doctors usually try a stepwise approach, starting with the simplest, most easily tolerated treatments.

Treatment usually begins with changes to your diet and medications that may help relieve persistent diarrhea. Your doctor may recommend that you:

If signs and symptoms persist, your doctor may recommend:

When the symptoms of microscopic colitis are severe, and medications aren't effective, your doctor may recommend surgery to remove all or part of your colon. Surgery is rarely needed to treat microscopic colitis.

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Changes to your diet may help relieve diarrhea that you experience with microscopic colitis. Try to:

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment and know what to expect from your doctor.

Some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

Don't hesitate to ask questions anytime you don't understand something.

Be ready to answer questions your doctor is likely to ask you:

You may find some relief from persistent diarrhea by making changes to your diet:

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Microscopic colitis - Diagnosis and treatment - Mayo Clinic

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