Page 10«..9101112..2030..»

Cyber security, 5G, AI 3 key drivers of post-Covid-19 digital economy – The Straits Times

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Quantum Medicine Comments Off on Cyber security, 5G, AI 3 key drivers of post-Covid-19 digital economy – The Straits Times

Artificial intelligence, 5G and cyber security will be the key drivers in growing Singapore's digital economy in a post-Covid-19 world.

Outlining the country's research plans to 2025, the National Research Foundation (NRF) said yesterday that new opportunities exist at the intersection of AI, 5G and cyber security, and in digital tools that engender trust in areas such as food, medicine and vaccine provenance.

At a virtual press conference announcing Singapore's seventh Research, Innovation and Enterprise (RIE) plan, Deputy Prime Minister Heng Swee Keat noted that the pandemic has increased the impetus to innovate and digitalise.

"We must continue to maximise the value created by digital innovation, and better integrate technology and governance," added Mr Heng, who is also Finance Minister and chairs the NRF.

One key area, as outlined in the RIE 2025, is AI-enabled cyber-security tools, as they are more capable than human beings in sniffing out security threats in critical infrastructure.

AI-enabled cyber security is key if 5G networks are to form the backbone of Singapore's digital economy, with the network potentially supporting mission-critical applications such as driverless car navigation and remote surgery.

Minister-in-charge of Cyber Security S. Iswaran said: "The new value is in the interstitials and the points of intersection."

"All of these (technologies) will undergird the next bound of economic growth... these technologies can catalyse paradigm-shifting applications," Mr Iswaran, who is also Minister for Communications and Information, added at the virtual press conference.

For example, AI and 5G can transform manufacturing, healthcare and transportation via smart factories, telemedicine and autonomous vehicles, respectively, he said. AI also powers highly automated smart factories, where the future of manufacturing lies. An emerging area Singapore is eyeing is electric and autonomous vehicles.

Trade and Industry Minister Chan Chun Sing said: "I am quite sure we have no competitive advantage in producing certain parts of the cars like the windscreen and the tyre."

"We want to focus on the high-value parts in the car manufacturing process that includes computational (and) navigation systems, and integrate them into a product that is of value to the market."

In this way, Singapore will not be easily overtaken by players that offer cheaper production, he added.

A portion of the research plan's $25 billion funding will go towards expanded missions. These include:

AI systems to improve decision-making at air and sea ports. Control systems with AI sensors can detect if aircraft have vacated a runway even in poor visibility and better direct ground traffic;

Quantum computing techniques to enhance cryptography methods in cyber security to better safeguard 5G applications and connectivity between data centres; and

Blockchain technologies to authenticate the provenance of food, medicine and vaccines. A blockchain is a decentralised digital database that ensures authenticity and transparency in record keeping.

DPM Heng also reiterated Singapore's continued focus on basic research in fields such as quantum computing.

It is known that quantum computing can be highly beneficial to scientific developments due to the new and faster way of processing information. For example, the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore is working with ST Engineering to develop new cyber-security tools which produce encryption codes that are unbreakable.

One-third of RIE 2025's $25 billion funding will go towards basic research.

Follow this link:

Cyber security, 5G, AI 3 key drivers of post-Covid-19 digital economy - The Straits Times

Read the Rest...

Deep tech to drive digital economy in Singapore post-Covid-19 world – The Straits Times

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Quantum Medicine Comments Off on Deep tech to drive digital economy in Singapore post-Covid-19 world – The Straits Times

SINGAPORE - Artificial intelligence (AI), 5G and cyber security will be the key drivers in growing Singapore's digital economy in a post-Covid-19 world.

Outlining the country's research plans through 2025, the National Research Foundation (NRF) said on Friday (Dec 11) that new opportunities exist at the intersection of AI, 5G and cyber security, and in digital tools that engender trust in areas such as food, medicine and vaccine provenance.

At a virtual press conference announcing Singapore's 7th Research, Innovation and Enterprise (RIE) plan, Deputy Prime Minister Heng Swee Keat noted that the Covid-19 pandemic has increased the impetus to innovate and digitalise.

"We must continue to maximise the value created by digital innovation, and better integrate technology and governance," added Mr Heng, who is also Finance Minister and chairs the NRF.

One key area, as outlined in the RIE2025, is AI-enabled cyber-security tools, as they are more capable than human beings insniffing out security threats in critical infrastructure.

AI-enabled cyber security is key if 5G networks are to form the backbone of Singapore's digital economy, with the network potentially supporting mission-critical applications, such as driverless car navigation and remote surgery.

"The new value is in the interstitials and the points of intersection," said Minister-in-charge of Cybersecurity S. Iswaran, who is also Minister for Communications and Information.

"All of these (technologies) will undergird the next bound of economic growth... These technologies can catalyse paradigm-shifting applications," said Mr Iswaran at the virtual press conference.

For example, AI and 5G can transform manufacturing, healthcare and transportation through smart factories, telemedicine and autonomous vehicles, respectively, he said.

AI also powers highly automated smart factories, where the future of manufacturing lies. An emerging area that Singapore is eyeing is electric and autonomous vehicles.

"I'm quite sure we have no competitive advantage in producing certain parts of the cars like the windscreen and the tyre," saidTrade and Industry Minister Chan Chun Sing.

"We want to focus on the high-value parts in the car manufacturing process that includes computational (and) navigation systems and integrate them into a product that is of value to the market," he said.

In this way, Singaporewill notbe easily overtaken by players that offer cheaper production, he added.

A portion of the research plan's $25 billion funding will go towards expanded missions. These include:

- AI systems to improve decision making at air and sea ports. Control systems with AI sensors that can detect if aircraft have vacated a runway even in poor visibility and better direct ground traffic;

- Quantum computing techniques to enhance cryptography methods in cyber security to better safeguard 5G applications and connectivity between data centres; and

- Blockchain technologies to authenticate the provenance of food, medicine and vaccine. A blockchain is a decentralised digital database that ensures authenticity and transparency in record keeping.

Such blockchain technology is already in use.Mangoes sold at the Pasir Panjang Wholesale Centre bear stickers with QR codes that provide information such as the fruit's origin, packing location and product certificate.

In his speech, Mr Heng also reiterated Singapore's continued focus on basic research in fields such as quantum computing.

It is known that quantum computing can be highly beneficial to scientific developments due to the new and faster way of processing information. As an example, the Centre for Quantum Technologies in the National University of Singapore is working with ST Engineering to develop new cyber-security tools which produce encryption codes that are unbreakable.

One-third of RIE2025's $25 billion funding will go towards basic research.

Visit link:

Deep tech to drive digital economy in Singapore post-Covid-19 world - The Straits Times

Read the Rest...

This Week’s Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through December 12) – Singularity Hub

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Quantum Medicine Comments Off on This Week’s Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through December 12) – Singularity Hub

ENVIRONMENT

Human-Made Stuff Now Outweighs All Life on Earth Stephanie Pappas | Scientific American Humanity has reached a new milestone in its dominance of the planet: human-made objects may now outweigh all of the living beings on Earth. Roads, houses, shopping malls, fishing vessels, printer paper, coffee mugs, smartphones and all the other infrastructure of daily life now weigh in at approximately 1.1 trillion metric tonsequal to the combined dry weight of all plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, archaea and protists on the planet.

So, It Turns Out SpaceX Is Pretty Good at Rocketing Eric Berger | Ars Technica As the Sun sank toward the South Texas horizon, a fantastical-looking spaceship rose into the reddening sky. It was, in a word,epic. This was one heck of a test-flight that addressed a number of unknowns about Starship, which is the upper stage of SpaceXs new launch system and may one day land humans on the Moon, Mars, and beyond.

Tiny Four-Bit Computers Are All You Need to Train AI Karen Hao | MIT Technology Review Theworkcould increase the speed and cut the energy costs needed to train deep learning by more than sevenfold. It could also make training powerful AI models possible on smartphones and other small devices, which would improve privacy by helping to keep personal data on a local device. And it would make the process more accessible to researchers outside big, resource-rich tech companies.

Did Quantum Scape Just Solve a 40-Year-Old Battery Problem? Daniel Oberhaus | Wired [The properties of solid state batteries] would sendenergy density through the roof, enable ultra-fast charging, and would eliminate the risk of battery fires. But for the past 40 years, no one has been able to make a solid-state battery that delivers on this promiseuntil earlier this year, when a secretive startup called QuantumScapeclaimed to have solved the problem. Now it has the data to prove it.

Hyundai Buys Boston Dynamics for Nearly $1 Billion. Now What? Evan Ackerman | IEEE Spectrum I hope that Boston Dynamics is unique enough that the kinds of rules that normally apply to robotics companies (or companies in general) can be set aside, at least somewhat, but I also worry that what made Boston Dynamics great was the explicit funding for the kinds of radical ideas that eventually resulted in robots like Atlas and Spot. Can Hyundai continue giving Boston Dynamics the support and freedom that they need to keep doing the kinds of things that have made them legendary? I certainly hope so.

CRISPR and Another Genetic Strategy Fix Cell Defects in Two Common Blood Disorders Jocelyn Kaiser | Science It is a double milestone: new evidence that cures are possible for many people born with sickle cell disease and another serious blood disorder, beta-thalassemia, and a first for the genome editor CRISPR. Today, in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and tomorrow at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) meeting, teams report that two strategies for directly fixing malfunctioning blood cells have dramatically improved the health of a handful of people with these genetic diseases.

The Dark Side of Big Techs Funding for AI Research Tom Simonite | Wired Timnit Gebrus exit from Google is a powerful reminder of how thoroughly companies dominate the field, with the biggest computers and the most resources. [Meredith] Whittaker of AI Now says properly probing the societal effects of AI is fundamentally incompatible with corporate labs. That kind of research that looks at the power and politics of AI is and must be inherently adversarial to the firms that are profiting from this technology.i

Image credit: Karsten Winegeart / Unsplash

Read this article:

This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through December 12) - Singularity Hub

Read the Rest...

Fact check: Gates was not caught on video saying the COVID-19 vaccine will change our DNA forever – Reuters

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Quantum Medicine Comments Off on Fact check: Gates was not caught on video saying the COVID-19 vaccine will change our DNA forever – Reuters

Viewed tens of thousands of times, a video claims Bill Gates got caught admitting vaccine will change our DNA forever. The video features authentic footage of Gates but misrepresents his remarks: he was explaining how vaccines developed with messenger RNA (mRNA) technology work. The claim that an mRNA vaccine will modify a persons DNA is also false.

Reuters Fact Check. REUTERS

The video is visible on YouTube here , Bitchute here , here and Parler here .

The video features a segment of footage visible on Gates own YouTube channel here and blog here , posted on April 30, 2020. In the 2:29-minute video, Gates explains how vaccines work and different methods for producing them.

A spokesperson for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation confirmed to Reuters via email that the original video shows Bill Gates discussing COVID-19 vaccines. They confirmed: mRNA vaccines do not change a persons DNA. Bill Gates did not make such a claim.

The clip in question youtu.be/u1AQ5EXcJYc?t=97 shows Gates explaining how vaccines developed with mRNA technology work. Full footage provides additional context to his remarks. He said:

Whats typically done is you take either a piece of the virus or just the spike, that thing on the surface, and you put it on something else. So theres no risk at all of causing the disease. One final way thats new and is promising is called the RNA vaccine. With RNA and DNA, instead of putting that shape in, you put instructions in the code to make that shape. The video in this claim then repeats the sentence you put the instructions in the code to make that shape.

Gates is saying that RNA vaccines put instructions in the code to make that shape, referring to the genetic code needed to produce a pathogens antigen, as explained in his blog on the subject here , which is used by the immune system to fight the disease ( here ).

As explained by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) here , the mRNA in the COVID-19 vaccine is not able to alter or modify a persons genetic makeup (DNA) and it does not affect or interact with our DNA in any way.

Reuters previously debunked similar claims on social media, visible here and here .

Mark Lynas, a visiting fellow at Cornell Universitys Alliance for Science group ( here ), debunked the idea that such a vaccine could genetically modify an organism. Lynas told Reuters that no vaccine can genetically modify human DNA.

Thats just a myth, he said. Genetic modification would involve the deliberate insertion of foreign DNA into the nucleus of a human cell, and vaccines simply dont do that.

Dr. Paul McCray, Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology, and Internal Medicine at the University of Iowa ( here ), previously explained to Reuters via email how a COVID-19 vaccine using a DNA or RNA vector would work:

As is the case with a vaccine that uses an inactivated (dead) virus, the only modification to the host is to stimulate them to make antibodies and T cells that will prevent infection with the virus or kill any infected cells to prevent or reduce disease severity. This is what happens if you get a virus infection naturally, but the vaccine takes the risk of serious disease out of the equation.

Some iterations of this claim include segments from another video visible youtu.be/M-3ggR1ueqQ?t=90 , which features additional claims about quantum dot dye technology, a specialized dye delivered by a microneedle patch that could enable the storage of a patients vaccination history under his or her skin ( here , here ).

As reported here , the technology consists of copper-based quantum dots embedded in biocompatible, micron-scale capsules. By administering the dots with microneedles, it delivers a near-infrared dye pattern that is invisible to the naked eye that can be read and interpreted by a customized smartphone.

This technology, however, does not exist to track people for the New World Order agenda as these videos claim ( here ).

The quantum dot dye technology project indeed received funding by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation as reported here , but this video misleadingly presents this technology and inaccurately describes it.

The video falsely claims that the dye is a chip and a tracking system that will alter your DNA.

Reuters previously debunked the claim that this technology is a microchip, here .

At the time, Kevin McHugh, one of the lead authors of the quantum dot dye research paper, told Reuters via email that the technology is not a microchip or human-implantable capsule.

Recently contacted by Reuters, McHugh confirmed that the quantum dot dye is not a tracking system and does not encode any personal information. He also confirmed it will not alter your DNA.

The video also alleges that the dye uses the Luciferase enzyme -- explained by Science Direct here as a natural light-producing enzyme that is found in fireflies and other microorganisms -- which would provoke a persons hand to glow with luminescence ( youtu.be/ksEVaO806Oo?t=70 ).

McHugh told Reuters that this technology does not use luciferase, or any enzyme for that matter, or even bioluminescence. McHugh also dismissed the idea that the dye would be administered in the hand, as the video claims, That is not a site anyone I know has ever considered, he added.

McHugh confirmed that to his knowledge there are no plans to use the quantum dot eye technology during the new coronavirus pandemic and its vaccine roll-out.

At least two candidates of the COVID-19 vaccine were made with mRNA ( here ), including the immunizations by front-runners Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech.

False. An mRNA vaccine will not genetically modify humans. Video shows Gates explaining how mRNA vaccines work. It also features false claims about the quantum dot dye technology. There are no plans to use this technology during the coronavirus pandemic.

This article was produced by the Reuters Fact Check team. Read more about our work to fact-check social media posts http://www.reuters.com/fact-check/about .

Go here to read the rest:

Fact check: Gates was not caught on video saying the COVID-19 vaccine will change our DNA forever - Reuters

Read the Rest...

CU Boulder physicists honored by National Academy of Inventors – CU Boulder Today

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Quantum Medicine Comments Off on CU Boulder physicists honored by National Academy of Inventors – CU Boulder Today

Two scientists who pioneered technologies for generating coherent X-rays, which helped propel research in dynamic processes in atoms, molecules and materials, have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, the academy announced today.

Margaret Murnane and Henry Kapteyn, physics professors at the University of Colorado Boulder, direct a laboratory in JILA, a joint institute of CU Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Margaret Murnane

They are among 175 inventors to be named 2020 National Academy of Inventors. Murnane and Kapteyn are co-inventors on 17 U.S. patents and have published more than 250 peer-reviewed journal articles. They are co-founders of KM Labs, a startup company that produces high-power, high-performance table-top laser systems.

The National Academy of Inventors Fellows Program highlights academic inventors who have demonstrated a spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society.

Murnane said she and Kapteyn were were surprised and honored to be named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. This honor means a great deal to us, since our passion is to create new and useful laser light sources in the X-ray region, she said, adding:

We so much enjoy working with CU Boulder students and collaborators from industry and national laboratories.

Kapteyn added, My goal as a kid was to become an inventor. I suppose I made it.

We so much enjoy working with CU Boulder students and collaborators from industry and national laboratories."

The Murnane-Kapteyn labs next challenge to create a new generation of X-ray microscopes that can work at the quantum limits of resolution and sensitivity, in real time, she said.

Murnane and Kapteyn joined the CU Boulder faculty in 1999. Murnane is also a professor in the CU Boulder Department of Electrical and Chemical Engineering. Kapteyn also serves as chief technology officer at KM Labs.

They are both members of the National Academy of Sciences and fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. They won the 2020 Franklin Medal in Physics, the 2018 Colorado Governors Award for High-Impact Research, and dozens of other honors.

Henry Kapteyn

Election to the National Academy of Inventors Fellows Program is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors. To date, fellows hold more than 42,700 issued U.S. patents, which have generated more than 13,000 licensed technologies and companies, and created more than 36 million jobs.

In addition, more than $2.2 trillion in revenue has been generated based on National Academy of Inventors fellows discoveries.

The 2020 fellow class represents 115 research universities and governmental and nonprofit research institutes worldwide. They collectively hold over 4,700 issued U.S. patents.

Among the 2020 fellows are 24 recipients of the National Academiesof Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, six recipients of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and two Nobel Laureates, as well as other honors and distinctions. Their collective body of research covers a range of scientific disciplines including biomedical engineering, computer engineering, materials science, and physics.

The class of fellows will be inducted at the 2021 Fellows Induction Ceremony at the Tenth Annual Meeting of the National Academy of Inventors next June in Tampa, Florida.

The National Academy of Inventors includes U.S. and international universities, and governmental and nonprofit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the United States Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

The complete list of National Academy of Inventor fellows is available on the organizations website.

Continued here:

CU Boulder physicists honored by National Academy of Inventors - CU Boulder Today

Read the Rest...

Silicon Therapeutics Announces Members of Scientific Advisory Board – Business Wire

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Quantum Medicine Comments Off on Silicon Therapeutics Announces Members of Scientific Advisory Board – Business Wire

BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Silicon Therapeutics, a privately-held, integrated therapeutics company with a pioneering drug discovery platform based on physics-driven molecular simulations, today announced the members of the Silicon Therapeutics scientific advisory board (SAB), which include Dr. Elliot L. Chaikof, Dr. Timothy P. Heffernan, Dr. Sun Hur, Dr. Pasi A. Jnne and Dr. Lijun Sun.

The Silicon Therapeutics SAB is comprised of experts in biophysics, medicinal chemistry, translational medicine and research and development (R&D) in oncology and immunology. These experts will serve as a strategic resource for Silicon Therapeutics to provide scientific review and high-level advice about the companys drug discovery strategy as it continues to advance the companys therapeutic pipeline using its proprietary simulation platform.

We are honored to officially welcome Drs. Chaikof, Heffernan, Hur, Jnne and Sun as members of our SAB, said Christopher Winter, Ph.D., chief of research and development. Each members expertise, insights and direction will provide a tremendous knowledge base that will help inform our approach regarding research and clinical development activities, which will be invaluable as we head into the next phase of our growth advancing our in-house research programs developed utilizing our proprietary drug discovery platform.

The SAB will be involved in strategic discussions related to targets, research and pre-clinical development, as well as the next generation, first-in-class therapeutic pipeline.

Silicon Therapeutics is focused on the discovery and development of first-in-class small molecules targeting key drivers of disease in cancer and inflammation that have proven difficult to treat with prior approaches and thus previously considered undruggable. The companys unique discovery platform is fully integrated with Silicon Therapeutics internal laboratories using cutting edge experimental capabilities in biophysics, biology and chemistry.

ABOUT THE SILICON THERAPEUTICS SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD

Elliot L. Chaikof, M.D., Ph.D. is a co-founder of Silicon Therapeutics and chair of the Roberta and Stephen R. Weiner department of surgery and surgeon-in-chief at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), as well as the Johnson & Johnson professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School in Boston. Dr. Chaikof is a member of the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering of Harvard University and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, also in Boston.

Dr. Chaikof earned a bachelor of arts degree and medical doctor degree from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and a doctor of philosophy degree in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston, where he focused on the design of artificial organs. Dr. Chaikof completed his training in general surgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and in vascular surgery at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta.

Timothy P. Heffernan, Ph.D. is head of oncology research within the division of therapeutics discovery and development at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Dr. Heffernan also serves as executive director for the Translational Research to Advance Therapeutics and Innovation in Oncology (TRACTION) platform, a translational research unit focused on accelerating the pre-clinical evaluation of novel drugs to inform innovative clinical trials.

Dr. Heffernan earned a doctor of philosophy degree in cell and molecular pathology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Chapel Hill, N.C. and performed his postdoctoral training at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School in Boston.

Sun Hur, Ph.D. is an Oscar M. Schloss professor in the department of biological chemistry and molecular pharmacology in the department of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School in Boston.

Dr. Hur earned a bachelor of science degree in physics from Ewha Womans University in Seoul, South Korea and a doctor of philosophy degree in physical chemistry with Dr. Thomas C. Bruice at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Hur did her post-doctoral work in x-ray crystallography with Dr. Robert M. Stroud at the University of California, San Francisco. She joined Harvard Medical School in 2008 as an assistant professor and became affiliated with Boston Childrens Hospital in 2010.

Pasi A. Jnne, M.D., Ph.D. is a thoracic medical oncologist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, a professor at Harvard Medical School, director of the Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology and director of the Belfer Center for Applied Cancer Science in Boston.

Dr. Jnne earned a medical doctor degree and doctor of philosophy degree at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He completed postgraduate training in internal medicine at Brigham and Womens Hospital and in medical oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.

Lijun Sun, Ph.D. is a co-founder of Silicon Therapeutics and an associate professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.

Dr. Sun earned a doctor of philosophy degree in organic chemistry from Emory University in Atlanta and completed postdoctoral training in biomaterial research at Emory School of Medicine in Atlanta.

ABOUT SILICON THERAPEUTICS

Silicon Therapeutics is a privately held, fully integrated drug design and development company focused on small molecule therapeutics. The Silicon Therapeutics proprietary physics-driven drug design platform combines quantum physics, statistical thermodynamics, molecular simulations, a dedicated HPC super-computing cluster, purpose-built software, in-house laboratories and clinical development capabilities. The platform was built from the ground up to address difficult targets using physics-based simulations and experiments to pioneer a new path for drug design with the prime goal of delivering novel medicines to improve the lives of patients.

Silicon Therapeutics is currently the only company that owns the entire spectrum of proprietary physics-driven drug discovery from chip-to-clinic. The companys lead program is a highly differentiated small molecule Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING) agonist for the treatment of cancer, which entered the clinic in November 2020. The companys headquarters are located in Boston. To learn more about Silicon Therapeutics, please visit our website at http://www.silicontx.com or follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Link:

Silicon Therapeutics Announces Members of Scientific Advisory Board - Business Wire

Read the Rest...

COVID-19 and cancer: From basic mechanisms to vaccine development using nanotechnology – DocWire News

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Nanotechnology Comments Off on COVID-19 and cancer: From basic mechanisms to vaccine development using nanotechnology – DocWire News

This article was originally published here

Int Immunopharmacol. 2020 Dec 2;90:107247. doi: 10.1016/j.intimp.2020.107247. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is a global pandemic which has induced unprecedented ramifications, severely affecting our society due to the long incubation time, unpredictably high prevalence and lack of effective vaccines. One of the interesting notions is that there is an association between COVID-19 and cancer. Cancer patients seem to exhibit exacerbated conditions and a higher mortality rate when exposed to the virus. Therefore, vaccines are the promising solution to minimise the problem amongst cancer patients threatened by the new viral strains. However, there are still limitations to be considered, including the efficacy of COVID vaccines for immunocompromised individuals, possible interactions between the vaccine and cancer, and personalised medicine. Not only to eradicate the pandemic, but also to make it more effective for immunocompromised patients who are suffering from cancer, a successful vaccine platform is required through the implementation of nanotechnology which can also enable scalable manufacturing and worldwide distribution along with its faster and precise delivery. In this review, we summarise the current understanding of COVID-19 with clinical perspectives, highlighting the association between COVID-19 and cancer, followed by a vaccine development for this association using nanotechnology. We suggest different administration methods for the COVID-19 vaccine formulation options. This study will contribute to paving the way towards the prevention and treatment of COVID-19, especially for the immunocompromised individuals.

PMID:33307513 | DOI:10.1016/j.intimp.2020.107247

Read more here:

COVID-19 and cancer: From basic mechanisms to vaccine development using nanotechnology - DocWire News

Read the Rest...

2018 Nanotechnology and Fuel Cell Research Review Market Insights into the Competitive Scenario of the Market – Tri-City Tribune

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Nanotechnology Comments Off on 2018 Nanotechnology and Fuel Cell Research Review Market Insights into the Competitive Scenario of the Market – Tri-City Tribune

Click Here to Get Sample Premium Report @ https://www.trendsmarketresearch.com/report/sample/11612

Report Scope

In recent years, nanotechnology has gained popularity across the world with advanced and modernized innovations in various applications including composite materials, nanoparticles, fabrication technologies, small machine equipment manufacturing and many others. Essentially, nanotechnology is deeply integrated in various industrial applications, providing advances in process delivery and costeffective applications in industries such as food and beverage, healthcare and life science, electronics, energy, aerospace, chemical and many others.

Request For Report Discounts @ https://www.trendsmarketresearch.com/report/discount/11612

Specifically, nanotechnology is being prominently used in fuel cell applications, as the fuel cell manufacturers applying platinum nanoparticles to lower the amount of platinum in cells for cost reduction. With surge in fuel cell electric vehicle production, nanotechnology application in fuel cell is expected to increase further. U.S. Department of Energy, The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (U.S.), and Union of Concerned Scientists (U.S.) are doing research for hydrogen powered fuel cell to make it more efficient, low cost and commercially viable.

Moreover, miniaturization in the electronic industry is leading to the introduction of new semiconductor manufacturing processes. For integrated circuits (ICs), comprising of nanofiber are expericing great demand in the industry. Nanofiber can withstand high amount of heat generated in electric power modules and exhibits good conductivity.

You can Buy This Report from Here @ https://www.trendsmarketresearch.com/checkout/11612/Single

Read more:

2018 Nanotechnology and Fuel Cell Research Review Market Insights into the Competitive Scenario of the Market - Tri-City Tribune

Read the Rest...

World Market Outlook for Carbon Nanomaterials to 2030 – MWCNTs Face Stiff Competition in Conductive Applications from Graphene and Other 2D Materials…

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Nanomaterials Comments Off on World Market Outlook for Carbon Nanomaterials to 2030 – MWCNTs Face Stiff Competition in Conductive Applications from Graphene and Other 2D Materials…

December 10, 2020 07:08 ET | Source: Research and Markets

Dublin, Dec. 10, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- "The Global Market for Carbon Nanomaterials 2020-2030: Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene, Fullerenes, Graphene Quantum Dots, 2D Materials and Nanodiamonds" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are the strongest, lightest and most conductive fibres known to man, with a performance-per-weight greater than any other material. In direct competition in a number of markets, they are complementary in others.

Once the most promising of all nanomaterials, MWCNTs face stiff competition in conductive applications from graphene and other 2D materials and in mechanically enhanced composites from nanocellulose. Several major producers have closed their MWCNT capacities, but applications continue to come to market and LG Chem has established a large-scale production facility. Super-aligned CNT arrays, films and yarns have found applications in consumer electronics, batteries, polymer composites, aerospace, sensors, heaters, filters and biomedicine.

Large-scale industrial production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been initiated, promising new market opportunities in transparent conductive films, conductive materials, transistors, sensors and memory devices. Again, a number of producers have ceased production, but those left are finding increased demand for their materials. SWCNTs are regarded as one of the most promising candidates to utilized as building blocks in next-generation electronics.

Two-dimensional(2D) materials are currently one of the most active areas of nanomaterials research, and offer a huge opportunity for both fundamental studies and practical applications, including superfast, low-power, flexible and wearable electronics, sensors, photonics and electrochemical energy storage devices that will have an immense impact on our society.

Graphene is a ground-breaking two-dimensional (2D) material that possesses extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties that promise a new generation of innovative devices. New methods of scalable synthesis of high-quality graphene, clean delamination transfer and device integration have resulted in the commercialization of state-of-the-art electronics such as graphene touchscreens in smartphones and flexible RF devices on plastics.

Nanodiamonds (NDs) are relatively easy and inexpensive to produce and have moved towards large-scale commercialization due to their excellent mechanical, thermal properties and chemical stability.

Other carbon nanomaterials of interest include fullerenes and more recently, carbon and graphene quantum dots.

This report on the carbon nanotubes, graphene and 2D materials and nanodiamonds market is by far the most comprehensive and authoritative report produced.

Report contents include:

Key Topics Covered:

1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

2 OVERVIEW OF GRAPHENE

3 OVERVIEW OF CARBON NANOTUBES

4 OVERVIEW OF FULLERENES

5 OVERVIEW OF NANODIAMONDS

6 OVERVIEW OF GRAPHENE QUANTUM DOTS

7 GRAPHENE PRODUCTION

8 CARBON NANOMATERIALS REGULATIONS

9 GRAPHENE PATENTS AND PUBLICATIONS

10 CARBON NANOTUBES PATENTS

11 GRAPHENE PRODUCTION

12 CARBON NANOTUBE SYNTHESIS AND PRODUCTION

13 PRODUCTION OF GRAPHENE QUANTUM DOTS

14 GRAPHENE PRICING

15 CARBON NANOTUBES PRICING

16 NANODIAMONDS PRICING

17 GRAPHENE QUANTUM DOTS PRICING

18 MARKETS FOR GRAPHENE

19 MARKETS FOR CARBON NANOTUBES

20 MARKETS FOR NANODIAMONDS

21 MARKETS FOR FULLERENES

22 MARKETS FOR GRAPHENE QUANTUM DOTS

23 GRAPHENE COMPANY PROFILES-PRODUCERS AND PRODUCT DEVELOPERS

24 MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES COMPANY PROFILES

25 SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES COMPANY PROFILES

26 NANODIAMOND PRODUCER PROFILES

27 GRAPHENE QUANTUM DOTS PRODUCERS

28 FULLERENES PRODUCERS

29 OTHER 2-D MATERIALS

30 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

31 REFERENCES

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/cd2d07

About ResearchAndMarkets.com ResearchAndMarkets.com is the world's leading source for international market research reports and market data. We provide you with the latest data on international and regional markets, key industries, the top companies, new products and the latest trends.

Research and Markets also offers Custom Research services providing focused, comprehensive and tailored research.

Read the original:

World Market Outlook for Carbon Nanomaterials to 2030 - MWCNTs Face Stiff Competition in Conductive Applications from Graphene and Other 2D Materials...

Read the Rest...

Here comes the Faraday fabric – TechCrunch

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Nanomaterials Comments Off on Here comes the Faraday fabric – TechCrunch

You dont have to buy into 5G conspiracy theories to think that you could do with a little less radiation in your life. One way of blocking radiation is a Faraday cage, but this is usually a metal mesh of some kind, making everyday use difficult. Researchers at Drexel University have managed to create a Faraday fabric by infusing ordinary cotton with a compound called MXene meaning your tinfoil hat is about to get a lot comfier.

Faraday cages work because radiation in radio frequencies is blocked by certain metals, but because of its wavelength, the metal doesnt even have to be solid it can be a solid cage or flexible mesh. Many facilities are lined with materials like this to prevent outside radiation from interfering with sensitive measurements, but recently companies like Silent Pocket have integrated meshes into bags and cases that totally isolate devices from incoming signals.

Lets be frank here and say that this is definitely paranoia-adjacent. RF radiation is not harmful in the doses and frequencies we get it, and the FCC makes sure no device exceeds certain thresholds. But theres also the possibility that your phone or laptop is naively connecting to public Wi-Fi, getting its MAC number skimmed by other devices, and otherwise interacting with the environment in a way you might not like. And honestly with the amount of devices emitting radiation right now, who wouldnt mind lowering their dose a little, just to be extra sure?

That may be much easier to do in the near future, as Yury Gogotsi and his team at the Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, of which he is director, have come up with a way to coat ordinary textile fibers in a metallic compound that makes them effective Faraday cages but also flexible, durable and washable.

The material, which they call MXene and is more of a category than a single compound, is useful in lots of ways, and the subject of dozens of papers by the team this is just the most recent application.

We have known for some time that MXene has the ability to block electromagnetic interference better than other materials, but this discovery shows that it can effectively adhere to fabrics and maintain its unique shielding capabilities, said Gogotsi in a news release. You can see the fabric in action on video here.

Image Credits: Drexel University

MXenes are conductive metal-carbon compounds that can be fabricated into all sorts of forms: solid, liquid, even sprays. In this case its a liquid a solution of tiny MXene flakes that adhere to the fabric quite easily and produce a Faraday effect, blocking 99.9% of RF radiation in tests. After sitting around for a couple years (perhaps forgotten in a lab cupboard) it kept 90% of their effectiveness, and the treated fabric can also be washed and worn safely.

You wouldnt necessarily want to wear a whole suit of the stuff, but this would make it easier for clothing to include an RF-blocking pocket in a jacket, jeans or laptop bag that doesnt feel out of place with the other materials. A hat (or underwear) with a layer of this fabric would be a popular item among conspiracy theorists, of course.

Its still a ways from showing up on the rack, but Gogotsi was optimistic about its prospects for commercialization, noting that Drexel has multiple patents on the material and its uses. Other ways of infusing fabric with MXenes could lead to clothes that generate and store energy as well.

You can read more about this particular application of MXenes in the journal Carbon.

View post:

Here comes the Faraday fabric - TechCrunch

Read the Rest...

Personalized Reusable Face Masks with Smart Nano-Assisted Destruction of Pathogens for COVID-19: a Visionary Road – DocWire News

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Nanomaterials Comments Off on Personalized Reusable Face Masks with Smart Nano-Assisted Destruction of Pathogens for COVID-19: a Visionary Road – DocWire News

This article was originally published here

Chemistry. 2020 Dec 7. doi: 10.1002/chem.202004875. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emergency has demonstrated that the utilization of face masks plays a critical role in limiting the outbreaks. Healthcare professionals utilize masks all day long without replacing them very frequently, thus representing a source of cross-infection for patients and themselves. Nanotechnology is a powerful tool with the capability to produce nanomaterials with unique physicochemical and anti-pathogen properties. Here, we outline how to realize non-disposable and highly comfortable respirators with light-triggered self-disinfection ability by bridging bioactive nanofiber properties and stimuli-responsive nanomaterials. The visionary road highlighted in this Concept is based on the possibility to develop a new generation of masks based on multifunctional membranes where the presence of nanoclusters and plasmonic nanoparticles arranged in a hierarchical structure enables the realization of a chemically-driven and on-demand anti-pathogen activities. Multilayer electrospun membranes have the ability to dissipate humidity present within the mask, enhancing the wearability and usability. The photo-thermal disinfected membrane is the core of these 3D printed and reusable masks with moisture pump capability. Personalized face masks with smart nano-assisted destruction of pathogens will bring enormous advantages to the entire global community, especially for front-line personnel, and will open up great opportunities for innovative medical applications.

PMID:33284500 | DOI:10.1002/chem.202004875

Read more:

Personalized Reusable Face Masks with Smart Nano-Assisted Destruction of Pathogens for COVID-19: a Visionary Road - DocWire News

Read the Rest...

Brain Implants Market: 3D-printed Neural Implants Hold Promising Potentials to Treat Parkinson’s Disease and Depression – BioSpace

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Nanomaterials Comments Off on Brain Implants Market: 3D-printed Neural Implants Hold Promising Potentials to Treat Parkinson’s Disease and Depression – BioSpace

Rare Brain Diseases Linked to COVID-19 Fuel Demand for Neural Implants

As the number of COVID-19 (coronavirus) cases continue to rise in the U.S., Russia, France, and Brazil, life-threatening and rare brain diseases are being linked to the infection. This has brought companies in the brain implants market into picture, since their assistance is crucial in the already stressed healthcare facilities. It has been found that certain individuals in their late 50s are at a risk of developing acute necrotizing encephalitis, which is a rare complication of influenza and other viral infections. This has fueled the growth of the brain implants market who are maintaining steady supply chains to meet the demand.

Acute necrotizing encephalitis has the potential to cause seizures and confusion, and in serious cases, can lead to coma. This has triggered the need for developing strong research databases to address complications of COVID-19.

Request Brochure of Report - https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=B&rep_id=2589

EU-funded Research Projects Boost Credibility of Med-tech Companies

Ultra-flexible cortical implants are capable of performing large-scale recording and stimulation of the brain, owing to its nanomaterials technology. BrainCom a collaborative research project that aims to develop a new generation of neuroprosthetic devices is being funded by the European Union under the FET Proactive funding scheme in order to advance in speech neural prostheses. However, such implants with neural technologies are subject to questions about their ethical aspects. Hence, companies in the brain implants market are using artificial intelligence (AI) to innovate in ultra-flexible cortical implants.

Flexible arrays of sensors based on graphene are being used to develop ultra-flexible cortical implants. These implants hold promising potentials to help an individual speak again. Companies in the brain implants market are using the flexibility of graphene to develop transistors that can be implanted on the human brain surface to achieve the decoding of neural activity.

Request for Analysis of COVID-19 Impact on Brain Implants Market - https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=covid19&rep_id=2589

3D-printed Neural Implants Hold Promising Potentials to Treat Parkinsons Disease and Depression

Brain implants hold promising potentials in the treatment of epilepsy, Parkinsons disease, and even severe depression. People with paralysis and locked-in syndrome regain communication and movement with the help of brain implants. Companies in the brain implants market are improving the softness and flexibility of systems, as rigid materials can cause tissue damage and inflammation over time. These companies should collaborate with researchers and engineers, such as in MIT, the U.S., to innovate in soft and flexible neural implants.

Flexible brain implants are capable of molding into the human brain contours without damaging the tissue. These soft electrodes are being developed by companies in the brain implants market and can be used to monitor neural activity. Flexible brain implants can be 3D (3 Dimensional) printed, resulting in a structure that is soft like rubber.

Request for Custom Research - https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=CR&rep_id=2589

Transformative Technologies in Brain Implants Offer Solutions for Alzheimers and Cerebral Palsy

The possibilities created by brain implants are coming into light for the treatment of Alzheimers, ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), and cerebral palsy. Companies in the brain implants market are increasing the availability of solutions for people suffering from motor diseases and neurological conditions. Such implants are bolstering market growth, as they have the potential to eliminate the need for open brain surgeries. Dell Technologies a U.S. multinational computer technology company is gaining strong business grounds in transformative technologies for brain implants by collaborating with think tanks and neuroscientists.

Companies in the brain implants market are increasing the availability of less invasive solutions, since brain is one of the most delicate and sensitive body organs. They are decoding the symphony of neural activity in order to stimulate brain function.

Pre Book Brain Implants Market Report at https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/checkout.php?rep_id=2589&ltype=S

Brain Implants with AI-powered Machines Translate Thoughts into Images

The U.S. neurotechnology company, Neuralink, is gaining global recognition for its demonstration of a new brain implant on a pig named Gertude. Companies in the brain implants market are taking cues from tech giants to develop prototype computer chips that wirelessly transmit data of an animals neural activity in a display. Such research experiments are being conducted to cure dementia and the Parkinsons disease. As such, innovations in neurotechnology companies are creating recruitment opportunities for scientists. Research demonstrations are often met with skepticism from experts, which helps companies to constantly improvise in technologies.

Brain implants are being used to assess, monitor, manipulate, and emulate the structure of neural systems. The proliferation of AI is another key driver, which is contributing toward the growth of the brain implants market. Brain implants are being powered with AI machines that hold promising solutions to translate a persons thoughts into images.

Browse More Trending by Transparency Market Research:

Injectable Benzodiazepine Market: https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/injectable-benzodiazepine-market.html

Oncology Small Molecule Drugs Market: https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/oncology-small-molecule-drugs-market.html

Protein A Resin Market: https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/protein-a-resin-market.html

About Us

Transparency Market Research is a next-generation market intelligence provider, offering fact-based solutions to business leaders, consultants, and strategy professionals.

Our reports are single-point solutions for businesses to grow, evolve, and mature. Our real-time data collection methods along with ability to track more than one million high growth niche products are aligned with your aims. The detailed and proprietary statistical models used by our analysts offer insights for making right decision in the shortest span of time. For organizations that require specific but comprehensive information we offer customized solutions through ad hoc reports. These requests are delivered with the perfect combination of right sense of fact-oriented problem solving methodologies and leveraging existing data repositories.

TMR believes that unison of solutions for clients-specific problems with right methodology of research is the key to help enterprises reach right decision.

Contact Mr. Rohit Bhisey Transparency Market Research State Tower, 90 State Street, Suite 700, Albany NY - 12207 United States USA - Canada Toll Free: 866-552-3453 Email: sales@transparencymarketresearch.com Website: https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/

Read more from the original source:

Brain Implants Market: 3D-printed Neural Implants Hold Promising Potentials to Treat Parkinson's Disease and Depression - BioSpace

Read the Rest...

Nanomaterials Market [2020-2026] Region Wise Analysis of Top Players in Market and its Types and Application – The Courier

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Nanomaterials Comments Off on Nanomaterials Market [2020-2026] Region Wise Analysis of Top Players in Market and its Types and Application – The Courier

FNF Research (fnfresearch.com) offering a comprehensive analysis on the Nanomaterials Market By Type (Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles, Silicon Dioxide, Antimony Tin Oxide Nanoparticles, Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles, Bismuth Oxide Nanoparticles, Graphene, Copper Oxide Nanoparticles, Carbon Nanotubes, Fullerene, and Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles), and By Application (Aerospace, Paints & Coatings, Automotive, Electronics, Energy & Power, Medical, and Others): Global Industry Outlook, Market Size, Business Intelligence, Consumer Preferences, Statistical Surveys, Comprehensive Analysis, Historical Developments, Current Trends, and Forecasts, 20202026 where users can benefit from the complete market research report with all the required useful information about this market. This is the latest report, covering the current COVID-19 impact on the market. The rapidly changing market scenario and initial and future assessment of the impact are covered in the report. The report discusses all major market aspects with an expert opinion on current market status along with historic data. This market report is a detailed study on the growth, investment opportunities, market statistics, growing competition analysis, major key players, industry facts, important figures, sales, prices, revenues, gross margins, market shares, business strategies, top regions, demand, and developments.

TheNanomaterials Marketreport entails a comprehensive database on Upcoming market estimation based on historical SWOT data analysis. It enables clients with quantified data for current market perusal. It is a professional and detailed report focusing on primary and secondary drivers, market share, leading segments, and regional analysis. Listed out are key players, major collaborations, merger & acquisitions along with upcoming and trending innovation. Business policies are reviewed from the techno-commercial perspective demonstrating better results. The report contains granular information & analysis pertaining to the Nanomaterials Market size, share, growth, trends, segment, and forecasts from 2020-2026.

According to the research report, " Global Nanomaterials market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 12% and is anticipated to reach around USD 20 billion by 2026. Nanomaterials are the smallest size of materials that are used in nanotechnology. The size of the nanomaterials changes from 1 nm to 100nm. "

Request an Exclusive Free Sample Report of Nanomaterials Market: https://www.fnfresearch.com/sample/nanomaterials-market-by-type-aluminum-oxide-nanoparticles-silicon-1321

(The sample of this report is readily available on request).

The FREE Sample Report Includes:

(**Note: The sample of this report is updated with COVID-19 impact analysis before delivery.**)

Top Market Players Profiles Covered in This Report:

Strem Chemicals Inc.

Nanophase Technologies Corporation

American Elements

Nanostructured & Amorphous Materials Inc.

US Research Nanomaterials Inc.

Hyperion Catalysis International Inc.

Nanocomposix Inc.

Quantum Materials Corp.

Reade International Corporation

SkySpring Nanomaterials Inc.

Cytodiagnostics Inc.

NanoMaterials Technology Pte Ltd.

Nanografi Nano Technology

Nanoshel

Frontier Carbon Corporation

Inquire To Know Additional List of Market Players Included, Request Here: https://www.fnfresearch.com/inquiry/nanomaterials-market-by-type-aluminum-oxide-nanoparticles-silicon-1321

Key Offerings:

The market research report also offers information on potential investment opportunities, strategic growth market analysis, and probable threats that will adhere to the client to systematically and creatively plan out the business models and strategies. The critical data analysis in the Nanomaterials market report is laid out in an upright way. This means that the information is represented in form of infographics, statistics, and uncomplicated graphs to make it an effortless and time-saving task for the client.

Growth of the overall global trust and corporate service market has also been forecasted for the period 2020-2026, taking into consideration the previous growth patterns, the growth drivers, and the current and future trends.

(**The consulting and implementation services segment to account for the highest market share during the forecast period.**)

The scope of the Nanomaterials Market report has a wide spectrum extending from market scenarios to comparative pricing between major players, cost, and profit of the specified market regions. The numerical data is supported by statistical tools such as SWOT analysis, BCG matrix, SCOT analysis, and PESTLE analysis. The statistics are depicted in a graphical format for a clear picture of facts and figures.

The generated report is strongly based on primary research, interviews with top executives, news sources, and information insiders. Secondary research techniques are utilized for better understanding and clarity for data analysis.

Download Report PDF Brochure Here to Know the COVID-19 Pandemic Business Impact Analysis on Nanomaterials Market: https://www.fnfresearch.com/sample/nanomaterials-market-by-type-aluminum-oxide-nanoparticles-silicon-1321

The report provides a complete view of the Nanomaterials market and encompasses a detailed type of portfolio and strategic developments of key vendors. To know the competitive landscape of the Nanomaterials market, an analysis of Porters five forces model is done. The study cover market attractiveness analysis, in which type, source type, and application segments are specialized based on the market size, growth rate, and attractiveness.

The report study further includes an in-depth analysis of industry players' market shares and provides an overview of leading players' market position in the Nanomaterials sector. Key strategic developments in the Nanomaterials market competitive landscape such as acquisitions & mergers, inaugurations of different products and services, partnerships & joint ventures, MoU agreements, VC & funding activities, R&D activities, and geographic expansion among other noteworthy activities by key players of the Nanomaterials market are appropriately highlighted in the report.

Customization Service of the Report:

(**FNF Research provides customization of reports as per your need. This report can be personalized to meet your requirements.**)

Table of Contents

Scope of the Nanomaterials Market Report:

Nanomaterials Market Historic Data (2019-2026):

Nanomaterials Market Forecast (2020-2026):

Browse detailed report with in-depth TOC @ https://www.fnfresearch.com/nanomaterials-market-by-type-aluminum-oxide-nanoparticles-silicon-1321

Research Coverage:

The Nanomaterials market has been segmented based on offering, technology, end-use application, and end-user. It also provides a detailed view of the market across four main regions: North America, Europe, APAC, and RoW.

Get in touch with our sales team sales@fnfresearch.com, who will guarantee you to get a report that suits your necessities.

About Us:

Facts & Factors is a leading market research company and offers customized research reports and consulting services. Facts & Factors aims at management consulting, industry chain research, and advanced research to assist our clients by providing planned revenue model for their business. Our report and services are used by prestigious academic institutions, start-ups, and companies globally to understand the international and regional business background.

Contact Us:

Facts & Factors

USA: +1-347-989-3985

Email: sales@fnfresearch.com

Web: https://www.fnfresearch.com

View original post here:

Nanomaterials Market [2020-2026] Region Wise Analysis of Top Players in Market and its Types and Application - The Courier

Read the Rest...

Value of adding the apparent diffusion coefficient to capsular contact for the prediction of extracapsular extension in prostate cancer – DocWire News

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Value of adding the apparent diffusion coefficient to capsular contact for the prediction of extracapsular extension in prostate cancer – DocWire News

This article was originally published here

Radiol Bras. 2020 Nov-Dec;53(6):381-389. doi: 10.1590/0100-3984.2019.0123.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether evaluating the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) together with capsular contact (CC) adds value in the prediction of microscopic extracapsular extension (ECE) of prostate cancer.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January 2012 and December 2016, 383 patients underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) of the prostate. A total of 67 patients were selected for inclusion. Two radiologists (observers 1 and 2), working independently, performed qualitative and quantitative analyses of ECE, macroscopic ECE, and microscopic ECE. A third radiologist assessed the correlation with the clinical data, and two experienced pathologists reviewed all histopathological findings.

RESULTS: Among the 67 patients, mpMRI showed lesions that were confined to the capsule in 44 (66.7%), had microscopic ECE in 12 (17.9%), and had macroscopic ECE in 11 (16.4%). There were no significant differences, in terms of the diagnostic accuracy, as measured by determining the area under the curve (AUC), of CC on T2-weighted images (CCT2), CC on diffusion-weighted imaging (CCDWI), and the mean ADC for the prediction of microscopic ECE, between observer 1 (AUC of 0.728, 0.691, and 0.675, respectively) and observer 2 (AUC of 0.782, 0.821, and 0.799, respectively). Combining the mean ADC with the CCT2 or CCDWI did not improve the diagnostic accuracy for either observer. There was substantial interobserver agreement for the qualitative evaluation of ECE, as demonstrated by the kappa statistic, which was 0.77 (0.66-0.87). The diagnostic accuracy (AUC) of the qualitative assessment for predicting microscopic ECE was 0.745 for observer 1 and 0.804 for observer 2, and the difference was less than significant. In a multivariate analysis, none of clinical or imaging parameters were found to be associated with ECE.

CONCLUSION: For the detection of microscopic ECE on mpMRI, CC appears to have good diagnostic accuracy, especially if the observer has considerable experience. Adding the mean ADC to the CCT2 or CCDWI does not seem to provide any significant improvement in that diagnostic accuracy.

PMID:33304005 | PMC:PMC7720667 | DOI:10.1590/0100-3984.2019.0123

Visit link:
Value of adding the apparent diffusion coefficient to capsular contact for the prediction of extracapsular extension in prostate cancer - DocWire News

Read the Rest...

Eight leading quantum computing companies in 2020 | ZDNet

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Quantum Computer Comments Off on Eight leading quantum computing companies in 2020 | ZDNet

The use of quantum computers has grown over the past several months as researchers have relied on these systems to make sense of the massive amounts of data related to the COVID-19 virus.

Quantum computers are based on qubits, a unit that can hold more data than classic binary bits, said Heather West, a senior research analyst at IDC.

Besides better understanding of the virus, manufacturers have been using quantum systems to determine supply and demand on certain products -- toilet paper, for example -- so they can make estimates based on trends, such as how much is being sold in particular geographic areas, she said.

"Quantum computers can help better determine demand and supply, and it allows manufacturers to better push out supplies in a more scientific way,'' West said. "If there is that push in demand it can also help optimize the manufacturing process and accelerate it and actually modernize it by identifying breakdowns and bottlenecks."

Quantum has gained momentum this year because it has moved from the academic realm to "more commercially evolving ecosystems,'' West said.

In late 2019, Google claimed that it had reached quantum supremacy, observed Carmen Fontana, an IEEE member and a cloud and emerging tech practice lead at Centric Consulting. "While there was pushback on this announcement by other leaders in tech, one thing was certain -- it garnered many headlines."

Echoing West, Fontana said that until then, "quantum computing had felt to many as largely an academic exercise with far-off implications. After the announcement, sentiment seemed to shift to 'Quantum computing is real and happening sooner than later'."

In 2020, there have been more tangible timelines and applications for quantum computing, indicating that the space is rapidly advancing and maturing, Fontana said.

"For instance, IBM announced plans to go from their present 65-qubit computer to a 1,000-qubit computer over the next three years," he said. "Google conducted a large-scale chemical simulation on a quantum computer, demonstrating the practicality of the technology in solving real-world problems."

Improved artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities, accelerated business intelligence, and increased productivity and efficiency were the top expectations cited by organizations currently investing in cloud-based quantum computing technologies, according to an IDC surveyearlier this year.

"Initial survey findings indicate that while cloud-based quantum computing is a young market, and allocated funds for quantum computing initiatives are limited (0-2% of IT budgets), end users are optimistic that early investment will result in a competitive advantage,'' IDC said.

Manufacturing, financial services, and security industries are currently leading the way by experimenting with more potential use cases, developing advanced prototypes, and being further along in their implementation status, according to IDC.

Quantum is not without its challenges, though. The biggest one West sees is decoherence, which happens when qubits are exposed to "environmental factors" or too many try to work together at once. Because they are "very, very sensitive," they can lose their power and ability to function, and as result, cause errors in a calculation, she said.

"Right now, that is what many of the vendors are looking to solve with their qubit solutions,'' West said.

Another issue preventing quantum from becoming more of a mainstream technology right now is the ability to manage the quantum systems. "In order to keep qubits stable, they have to be kept at very cold, subzero temps, and that makes it really difficult for a lot of people to work with them,'' West said.

Nevertheless, With the time horizon of accessible quantum computing now shrinking to a decade or less, Fontana believes we can expect to see "an explosion of start-ups looking to be first movers in the quantum applications space. These companies will seek to apply quantum's powerful compute power to solve existing problems in novel ways."

Here are eight companies that are already focused on quantum computing.

Atom Computing is a quantum computing hardware company specializing in neutral atom quantum computers. While it is currently prototyping its first offerings, Atom Computing said it will provide cloud access "to large numbers of very coherent qubits by optically trapping and addressing individual atoms," said Ben Bloom, founder and CEO.

The company also builds and creates "complicated hardware control systems for use in the academic community,'' Bloom said.

Xanadu is a Canadian quantum technology company with the mission to build quantum computers that are useful and available to people everywhere. Founded in 2016, Xanadu is building toward a universal quantum computer using silicon photonic hardware, according to Sepehr Taghavi, corporate development manager.

The company also provides users access to near-term quantum devices through its Xanadu Quantum Cloud (XQC) service. The company also leads the development of PennyLane, an open-source software library for quantum machine learning and application development, Taghavi said.

In 2016, IBM was the first company to put a quantum computer on the cloud. The company has since built up an active community of more than 260,000 registered users, who run more than one billion every day on real hardware and simulators.

In 2017, IBM was the first company to offer universal quantum computing systems via theIBM Q Network. The network now includes more than 125 organizations, including Fortune 500s, startups, research labs, and education institutions. Partners include Daimler AG,JPMorgan Chase, andExxonMobil. All use IBM's most advanced quantum computers to simulate new materials for batteries, model portfolios and financial risk, and simulate chemistry for new energy technologies, the company said.

By2023, IBM scientists will deliver a quantum computer with a 1,121-qubit processor, inside a 10-foot tall "super-fridge" that will be online and capable of delivering a Quantum Advantage-- the point where certain information processing tasks can be performed more efficiently or cost effectively on a quantum computer, versus a classical one, according to the company.

ColdQuanta commercializes quantum atomics, which it said is "the next wave of the information age." The company's Quantum Core technology is based on ultra-cold atoms cooled to a temperature of nearly absolute zero; lasers manipulate and control the atoms with extreme precision.

The company manufactures components, instruments, and turnkey systems that address a broad spectrum of applications: quantum computing, timekeeping, navigation, radiofrequency sensors, and quantum communications. It also develops interface software.

ColdQuanta's global customers include major commercial and defense companies; all branches of the US Department of Defense; national labs operated by the Department of Energy; NASA; NIST; and major universities, the company said.

In April 2020, ColdQuanta was selected by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop a scalable, cold-atom-based quantum computing hardware and software platform that can demonstrate quantum advantage on real-world problems.

Zapata Computing empowers enterprise teams to accelerate quantum solutions and capabilities. It introduced Orquestra, an end-to-end, workflow-based toolset for quantum computing. In addition to previously available backends that include a full range of simulators and classical resources, Orquestra now integrates with Qiskit and IBM Quantum's open quantum systems, Honeywell's System Model H, and Amazon Braket, the company said.

The Orquestra workflow platform provides access to Honeywell's H, and was designed to enable teams to compose, run, and analyze complex, quantum-enabled workflows and challenging computational solutions at scale, Zapata said. Orquestra is purpose-built for quantum machine learning, optimization, and simulation problems across industries.

Recently introduced Azure Quantum provides a "one-stop-shop" to create a path to scalable quantum computing, Microsoft said. It is available in preview to select customers and partners through Azure.

For developers, Azure Quantum offers:

Founded in 1999, D-Wave claims to be the first company to sell a commercial quantum computer, in 2011, and the first to give developers real-time cloud access to quantum processors with Leap, its quantum cloud service.

D-Wave's approach to quantum computing, known as quantum annealing, is best suited to optimization tasks in fields such as AI, logistics, cybersecurity, financial modeling, fault detection, materials sciences, and more. More than 250 early quantum applications have been built to-date using D-Wave's technology, the company said.

The company has seen a lot of momentum in 2020. In February, D-Wave announced the launch of Leap 2, which introduced new tools and features designed to make it easier for developers to build bigger applications. In July, the company expanded access to Leap to India and Australia. In March, D-Wave opened free access to Leap for researchers working on responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. In September, the company launched Advantage, a quantum system designed for business. Advantage has more than 5,000 qubits, 15-way qubit connectivity, and an expanded hybrid solver service to run problems with up to one million variables, D-Wave said. Advantage is accessible through Leap.

Strangeworks, a startup based in Austin, Texas, claims to be lowering the barrier to entry into quantum computing by providing tools for development on all quantum hardware and software platforms. Strangeworks launched in March 2018, and one year later, deployed a beta version of its software platform to users from more than 140 different organizations. Strangeworks will open its initial offering of the platform in Q1 2021, and the enterprise edition is coming in late 2021, according to Steve Gibson, chief strategy officer.

The Strangeworks Quantum Computing platform provides tools to access and program quantum computing devices. The Strangeworks IDE is platform-agnostic, and integrates all hardware, software frameworks, and supporting languages, the company said. To facilitate this goal, Strangeworks manages assembly, integrations, and product updates. Users can share their work privately with collaborators, or publicly. Users' work belongs to them and open sourcing is not required to utilize the Strangeworks platform.

Read more here:

Eight leading quantum computing companies in 2020 | ZDNet

Read the Rest...

Chinese quantum computer may be the most powerful ever seen – Siliconrepublic.com

§ December 13th, 2020 § Filed under Quantum Computer Comments Off on Chinese quantum computer may be the most powerful ever seen – Siliconrepublic.com

This week in future tech, a Chinese quantum computer can reportedly solve a problem in 200 seconds, compared to the 2.5bn years a supercomputer needs.

A quantum computer developed at the University of Science and Technology in Hefei, China, has caught the worlds attention due to what appears to be a performance vastly exceeding others that exist today.

According to findings in published in Scienceand reported by Nature, the new system is allegedly the first definitive demonstration of a quantum advantage using laser beams, which is not mathematically possible using traditional binary computers.

We have shown that we can use photons, the fundamental unit of light, to demonstrate quantum computational power well beyond the classical counterpart, said researcher Jian-Wei Pan.

Tasked with solving the so-called boson sampling problem, the researchers found solutions in as little as 200 seconds. By comparison, it could take Chinas TaihuLight supercomputer about 2.5bn years to do the same.

However, Christian Weedbrook, chief executive of quantum-computing start-up Xanadu, said that unlike Googles Sycamore quantum computer announced last year, the Chinese quantum computer is not programmable. This means that, so far, it cannot be used for solving practical problems.

Scientists from the University of Washington have unveiled a drone that smells, using the power of a moth. Writing in IOP Bioinspiration and Biomimetics, they revealed their Smellicopter design.

The autonomous drone uses a live antenna from a moth to navigate toward smells, while also having the ability to sense and avoid obstacles. A moth uses its antennae to sense chemicals in its environment and navigate toward sources of food or potential mates.

In this case, the researchers used antennae from the Manduca sexta hawkmoth for Smellicopter. The moths were placed in a fridge to anaesthetise them before removing their antennae. Once separated, the live moth antennae could stay chemically active for four hours.

By adding tiny wires into either end of the antenna, the researchers were able to connect it to an electrical circuit and measure the average signal from all of the cells in the antenna. As for what it could smell, Smellicopter could be used to detect things such as gas leaks, explosives and disaster survivors.

From a robotics perspective, this is genius, said Sawyer Fuller of the University of Washington. The classic approach in robotics is to add more sensors, and maybe build a fancy algorithm or use machine learning to estimate wind direction. It turns out, all you need is to add a fin.

German air taxi firm Volocopter said it plans to make regular services a reality in Singapore within the next three years. In October 2019, Volocopter completed the its first air taxi demonstration flight over the Marina Bay area of Singapore and is now looking to obtain the necessary regulatory approvals, including those from Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore and the European Union Aviation Safety.

The first route is expected to be a touristic route over the southern waters, offering views of the Marina Bay skyline, and future routes may include cross-border flights. The company is expected to hire over 200 full-time employees in Singapore to manage a network of routes by 2026.

The citys research institutes conducting R&D play an integral part in this, said Florian Reuter, CEO of Volocopter. Topics like route validation for autonomous operations, material science and research regarding battery technology are very important for our long-term business success.

The Global Mobile Suppliers Association (GSA) has reported that the number of announced 5G devices has surpassed 500 for the first time. By the end of November this year, there were 519 announced 5G devices, of which 303 were commercially available.

In the last three months, the number of announced 5G devices has grown by 29.4pc, while there has been a 59.5pc increase in the number of commercially available 5G devices over the same period.

This year weve seen more and more symbolically important milestones being passed over 500 announced 5G devices, more than 100 vendors, over 250 different phones, and 100 fixed wireless access CPE devices, said Joe Barrett, president of the GSA.

And it doesnt stop there; we expect more 5G devices to become commercially available, surpassing the 330 mark before the year is out. The device vendor community has stepped up and delivered in the face of unprecedented challenges. As an industry, we can be excited about the opportunities 2021 will bring.

Want stories like this and more direct to your inbox? Sign up for Tech Trends, Silicon Republics weekly digest of need-to-know tech news.

Read the original here:

Chinese quantum computer may be the most powerful ever seen - Siliconrepublic.com

Read the Rest...

Clene Nanomedicine Presents Blinded Interim Results from RESCUE-ALS Phase 2 Study at the 31st International Symposium on ALS/MNDResults provide…

§ December 11th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Clene Nanomedicine Presents Blinded Interim Results from RESCUE-ALS Phase 2 Study at the 31st International Symposium on ALS/MNDResults provide…

SALT LAKE CITY, Dec. 10, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Clene Nanomedicine, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company, today announced the presentation of blinded interim results from the Phase 2 RESCUE-ALS clinical trial investigating the effects of its lead clinical candidate, CNM-Au8, for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). CNM-Au8 is an aqueous suspension of clean-surfaced, faceted gold nanocrystals with catalytic activity that has been shown to enhance the metabolic energetic capacity of motor neurons while simultaneouslyreducing oxidative stress.

As of the data cutoff (October 27, 2020), the trial was fully enrolled with a preliminary blinded assessment of the studys primary endpoint, the motor neuron number index-4 [MUNIX(4)] score, showing that more than 40% of enrolled patients with completed week 12 data experienced improvements in motor neuron function assessed by MUNIX. When compared to baseline values, the average MUNIX(4) score of the overall trial population (including both active CNM-Au8 and placebo) experienced an absolute increase in mean MUNIX(4) values. This increase exceeded the expectations of the statistical modeling on which the study was based, which predicted a linear decline in average MUNIX(4) score from study onset (Neuwirth et al. JNNP 2015). These data, while blinded, suggest that CNM-Au8 may have neuro-reparative potential in ALS patients. Clene expects to report the complete, unblinded results from the RESCUE-ALS study in 2H 2021.

Although blinded to treatment assignment, these data are encouraging. We believe Clenes breakthrough approach with the application of physics to biology via direct electron interactions within cellular systems at the nano-scale may hold the potential to revolutionize the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS and other motor neuron diseases, said Robert Glanzman, MD, FAAN, Chief Medical Officer of Clene.

Rob Etherington, President and CEO of Clene added, This blinded interim analysis suggests that CNM-Au8 is working mechanistically to address a foundational challenge common to many neurodegenerative diseases, namely that stressed or failing neurons need additional energy for their survival, repair, and improved function. Emerging MUNIX data potentially indicate preservation of motor units, which is promising. We eagerly anticipate final results and are encouraged that these blinded interim results may provide hope for ALS patients and their families as they search for new therapies to treat this devastating disease.

The presentation (CLT-23) titled, RESCUE-ALS Trial, A Phase 2, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of CNM-Au8 to Slow Disease Progression in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients: Design and Interim Blinded Results, is available as a live e-Poster on December 10th at 12:10 12:50 pm EST at the Virtual 31st International Symposium on ALS/MND, held online (https://symposium.mndassociation.org/virtual-2020/).

About RESCUE-ALS RESCUE-ALS is a Phase 2 multi-center, randomized, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled study examining the efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of CNM-Au8 in participants who are newly symptomatic with ALS (within 24-months of screening or 12-months from diagnosis). Enrolled subjects will be randomized 1:1 to receive either active treatment with CNM-Au8 (30 mg) or placebo in addition to their current standard of care. Participants will receive their randomized treatment over 36 consecutive weeks during the treatment period. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of improving neuronal bioenergetics, reducing reactive oxygen species and promoting protein homeostasis with CNM-Au8 to slow disease progression in patients with ALS. In the trial, efficacy is assessed as the average change in motor neuron unit number index (MUNIX) estimated by electromyography for the abductor digiti minimi (ADM), abductor pollicis brevis (APB), biceps brachii (BB), and tibialis anterior (TA) (muscles of the hand, arm, and leg). The trial was fully enrolled with 44 participants as of the reported 27-October-2020 data cut. Baseline characteristics include [mean (SD)], MUNIX(4) score: 93.7 (45.8); FVC % predicted: 80.8 (16.3); ALSFRS-R: 38.6 (6.1); ALSSQOL-20: 3.3 (1.3), mean time from diagnosis: 4.7 (4.6) months; riluzole background treatment, 92%.

About CNM-Au8 CNM-Au8 is a concentrated, aqueous suspension of clean-surfaced faceted gold nanocrystals that act catalytically to support important intracellular biological reactions. CNM-Au8 consists solely of pure gold nanoparticles, composed of clean-surfaced, faceted, geometrical crystals held in suspension in sodium bicarbonate buffered, pharmaceutical grade water. CNM-Au8 has demonstrated safety in Phase 1 studies in healthy volunteers and has shown both remyelination and neuroprotective effects in multiple preclinical (animal) models. Preclinical data, both published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at scientific congresses, demonstrate that treatment of neuronal cultures with CNM-Au8 improves survival of neurons, protects neurite networks, decreases intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species and improves mitochondrial capacity in response to cellular stresses induced by multiple disease-relevant neurotoxins. Oral treatment with CNM-Au8 improved functional behaviors in rodent models of ALS, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinsons disease versus vehicle (placebo). CNM-Au8 is currently being tested in a Phase 2 clinical study for the treatment of chronic optic neuropathy in patients with MS in addition to Phase 2 and Phase 3 clinical studies for disease progression in patients with ALS.

About ALS ALS is a universally fatal neurodegenerative disorder that results in loss of motor neurons in the cerebral cortex, brain stem, and spinal cord. ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, leads to the death of the neurons controlling voluntary muscles resulting in weakness, muscle atrophy, and progressive paralysis. ALS affects more than 15,000 patients in the United States and is the most prevalent adult-onset progressive motor neuron disease.

About Clene Clene is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of unique therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. Clene has innovated a novel nanotechnology drug platform for the development of a new class of orally administered neurotherapeutic drugs. Clene has also advanced into the clinic an aqueous solution of ionic zinc and silver for anti-viral and anti-microbial uses. Founded in 2013, the company is based in Salt Lake City, Utah with R&D and manufacturing operations located in North East, Maryland. For more information, please visit http://www.clene.com.

Forward-Looking Statements This press release contains, and certain oral statements made by representatives of Tottenham, Clene, and their respective affiliates, from time to time may contain, "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the "safe harbor" provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Tottenham's and Clene's actual results may differ from their expectations, estimates and projections and consequently, you should not rely on these forward-looking statements as predictions of future events. Words such as "expect," "estimate," "project," "budget," "forecast," "anticipate," "intend," "plan," "may," "will," "could," "should," "believes," "predicts," "potential," "might" and "continues," and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements include, without limitation, Tottenham's and Clene's expectations with respect to future performance and anticipated financial impacts of the business combination, the satisfaction of the closing conditions to the business combination and the timing of the completion of the business combination. These forward-looking statements involve significant risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from expected results. Most of these factors are outside the control of Tottenham or Clene and are difficult to predict. Factors that may cause such differences include, but are not limited to: (1) the occurrence of any event, change or other circumstances that could give rise to the termination of the Merger Agreement relating to the proposed business combination; (2) the outcome of any legal proceedings that may be instituted against Tottenham or Clene following the announcement of the Merger Agreement and the transactions contemplated therein; (3) the inability to complete the business combination, including due to failure to obtain approval of the shareholders of Tottenham or other conditions to closing in the Merger Agreement; (4) delays in obtaining or the inability to obtain necessary regulatory approvals (including approval from regulators, as applicable) required to complete the transactions contemplated by the Merger Agreement; (5) the occurrence of any event, change or other circumstance that could give rise to the termination of the Merger Agreement or could otherwise cause the transaction to fail to close; (6) the inability to obtain or maintain the listing of the post-acquisition company's ordinary shares on NASDAQ following the business combination; (7) the risk that the business combination disrupts current plans and operations as a result of the announcement and consummation of the business combination; (8) the ability to recognize the anticipated benefits of the business combination, which may be affected by, among other things, competition, the ability of the combined company to grow and manage growth profitably and retain its key employees; (9) costs related to the business combination; (10) changes in applicable laws or regulations; (11) the possibility that Clene or the combined company may be adversely affected by other economic, business, and/or competitive factors; and (12) other risks and uncertainties to be identified in the Form S-4 filed by Chelsea Worldwide (when available) relating to the business combination, including those under "Risk Factors" therein, and in other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) made by Tottenham and Clene. Tottenham and Clene caution that the foregoing list of factors is neither exclusive nor exhaustive. Tottenham and Clene caution readers not to place undue reliance upon any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date made. Neither Tottenham or Clene undertakes or accepts any obligation or undertaking to release publicly any updates or revisions to any forward-looking statements to reflect any change in its expectations or any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statement is based, subject to applicable law. The information contained in any website referenced herein is not, and shall not be deemed to be, part of or incorporated into this press release.

Media Contact Andrew Mielach LifeSci Communications (646) 876-5868 amielach@lifescicomms.com

Investor Contact Bruce Mackle LifeSci Advisors, LLC (929) 469-3859 bmackle@lifesciadvisors.com

Go here to read the rest:
Clene Nanomedicine Presents Blinded Interim Results from RESCUE-ALS Phase 2 Study at the 31st International Symposium on ALS/MNDResults provide...

Read the Rest...

Here to stay and redefine: The Brave New World of GMO – Daily Maverick

§ December 11th, 2020 § Filed under Genetically Modified Humans Comments Off on Here to stay and redefine: The Brave New World of GMO – Daily Maverick

On 19 August 2020, UK based biotechnology company, Oxitec, announced a landmark agreement on its website that will see Oxitec release some 750 million genetically modified male mosquitoes in the Florida Keys, US, across 2021 and 2022. The reason for the release of the mosquitos is to counter the spread of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito, an invasive species that spreads dengue fever, Zika, chikungunya and yellow fever. The male of the species is relatively harmless, as it does not bite humans or other animals, living on fruit instead, while the female lives on a diet of fruit and human blood.

What Oxitec have done is create genetically modified male mosquitoes with a self-limiting gene that prevents possible female offspring from surviving once the genetically modified males mate with the wild females. Should the offspring be male, it will survive, but also carry a copy of the self-limiting gene, so that when it breeds, its female offspring will not survive. The goal is to suppress the mosquito population and the spread of disease by limiting the reproduction of females.

Closer to home, similar GMO (Genetically Modified Organism) based projects exist to kill off the mosquito population, which is responsible for the spread of Malaria. According to the World Health Organisation, annual malaria deaths stood at 405,000 in 2018, 94% of those in Africa.

The fight against mosquito-borne illnesses is but one of the ways in which GMO technology is being used to target societal and health challenges. As per the name, GMO literally refers to genetically modified organisms, across all various forms of life. This could refer to animals, plants, bacteria and viruses. For example, in the field of medicine, one of the most well-known uses of genetic modification comes in the form of insulin given to people with diabetes. While natural insulin could be taken from the pancreases of pigs or cattle, that insulin causes an adverse reaction in some people, and there might be ethical concerns from animal rights groups as well as some religious groups. Hence today, the overwhelming amount that life-saving insulin is genetically modified from bacteria and human DNA.

Perhaps the best known and most controversial examples of GMOs are the agricultural kind, in the form of GMO foods. As with other forms of genetic modification, even in food, this refers to a change or a tweak in the genetic code. Admittedly, conventional breeding methods such as cross-breeding of plants have been altering the genetic structure of some organisms for centuries. However, biotechnology has made it possible for this and much more to be done in a lab, at the cellular level, and far more precisely.

Today, the overwhelming majority of maize, soybeans and cotton grown across the world are genetically modified. In Africa, South Africa and Sudan got in early and are now leaders in GMO crops across the continent. South Africa started in 1997, with genetically modified cotton. According to the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA)s annual GMO report for 2017, 85% of maize grown in South Africa is genetically modified, as well as 95% of the soybean crop, and 100% of cotton.

For farmers, besides the crop itself, there are three external factors that concern them when it comes to the yield: insects, weeds, and the weather. Much of the genetic modification is targeted at these. For example, in the case of maize, various genetic modifications include making the crop more resistant to insects, worm infestations, and even drought.

Additionally, proponents of GMO foods cite food insecurity, especially in developing countries as a key reason why more countries should adopt GMO agriculture.

The United Nations Food & Agriculture Programme has noted that global production of food, feed and fibre will need approximately to double by 2050 to meet the demands of a growing global population. Organisations opposed to modern plant breeding, with Greenpeace at their lead, have repeatedly denied these facts and opposed biotechnological innovations in agriculture. They have misrepresented their risks, benefits, and impacts, and supported the criminal destruction of approved field trials and research projects. We urge Greenpeace and its supporters to re-examine the experience of farmers and consumers worldwide with crops and foods improved through biotechnology, recognise the findings of authoritative scientific bodies and regulatory agencies, and abandon their campaign against GMOs in general and Golden Rice in particular.

The above excerpt is from the opening lines of an open letter published in 2016, and initially signed by 129 Nobel Laureates, across the fields of Chemistry, Medicine, Physics, and Economics. Since then, the number of signatories has gone up 156, covering Nobel Laureates from 1962 to 2018.

In a follow-up paper to the above letter, published in 2018, and written by the initiator of the open letter, British biochemist, molecular biologist and 1993 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine, Sir Richard John Roberts; he cites banana farming in Central and Eastern Africa as, an interesting example of how GMO approaches might have significant economic and nutritional effects. The paper highlights what is still an ongoing problem in many banana cultivating African countries, a disease called Banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW) for which there is no known naturally resistant variety of banana available.

BXW effectively causes bananas to rot from the inside out. According to research published by the Plantwise Knowledge Bank: The disease starts to attack the plant at the seedling stage. Initial symptoms of the disease on inset include the presence of bacterial ooze in the leaf petioles and leaf sheaths, excretion of a yellowish bacterial ooze, internal yellow discoloration of vascular bundles and progressive wilting and yellowing of the leaves from the top downwards. Eventually, the whole plant wilts, the leaves dry out and the plant dies. The disease can cause losses up to 100%. Although it was first reported in Ethiopia back in 1968, spread beyond Ethiopia was not reported until 2001, when it was found in Uganda. Since then, it has spread relatively rapidly, to Rwanda, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania and Burundi, threatening the livelihoods of millions of small banana farmers.

However, in his paper, Roberts states that: Local scientists working at the National Agricultural Research Organization in Kenya noticed that the sweet pepper, which is widely grown and eaten, is resistant to the Xanthomonas bacterium. They found that two genes in the pepper are responsible for this resistance and so they isolated these two genes and moved them into banana plants. The results were spectacular. The bananas were now resistant to Xanthomonas wilt and had no obvious problems. This was a massive scientific breakthrough, but again because the new bananas were made by GMO methods, the anti-GMO activists have been trying very hard to stop its dissemination. However, it has been shown by bioinformatics analysis that these GM Bananas do not pose a risk of allergenicity or toxicity. However, recently a bill was passed in the Ugandan Parliament that set out the regulations that would be necessary to grow this new Xanthomonas wilt-resistant banana. This has not yet been signed into law by the President, but it is very much hoped, especially by the farmers in Uganda, that it soon will be.

The overwhelming body of research has led to consensus in the scientific community, that GMO foods are not any more harmful than conventionally bred plants, with some going as far as saying they could be potentially healthier due to the reduction of dependence on chemicals and pesticides.

All serious scientific studies; ie those published in prestigious journals, show that the plant varieties prepared by GM methods are not more dangerous than those available by traditional breeding techniques. If anything, the GMO varieties are likely to be safer than traditionally bred varieties because they are subject to many more controls. Traditional methods are not precise in the way that the GM method is, states Roberts is his paper.

However, anti-GMO activists, such as Greenpeace, state numerous reasons for their opposition to GM crops. One such being the potential corporate takeover of farming by big business, as illustrated by this quote from an article published by Greenpeace in October 2019, in opposition to growing GMO cotton in Kenya: The push for GMO crops represent a corporate takeover of our food system. GMOs block the real solutions coming from sustainable farming that are addressing the impacts of climate change being felt by farmers and people all over the world.

While it is important to revive the textile industry in Kenya, KALRO and other government agencies should look at encouraging farmers in Kenya to grow conventional cotton varieties that use organic and sustainable ways of controlling bollworms.

The field of genetic modification is still very much in its early stages. There is no denying the overwhelming body of research that supports GMO crops for both economic and health reasons. Scientific research has repeatedly found GMO crops to be no less healthy or any more harmful than regular crops. However, with regards to potential for monopolistic practices, much remains to be seen.

An article published by Devex, a development and aid worker media platform, highlights Greenpeace and Fairtrade International as the main bodies that are opposed to GMO crops, stating: According to Juliet Perry, from Greenpeaces Asia Pacific Communications Hub, the promotion of GMO crops represents a corporate takeover of food systems with six corporations Monsanto, DuPont, Dow, Syngenta, Bayer, and BASF now controlling 75% of the world pesticides market, 63% of the commercial seed market, and more than 75% of all private sector research into seeds and pesticides. GE [genetically engineered] crops are used as a lure to make farmers dependent on buying seeds and agrochemicals every year from big corporations that market them as wonder crops. The reality is vastly different, but once hooked, farmers lose control of the seeds they once used and are unable to continue using ecological pest management. Instead, farmers have no choice but to buy the full package of pesticides that need to be used with the GE seeds to ensure they perform.

While the science may be on the side of GMOs, at this relatively early stage of biotechnology, the cost of development and regulations does favour big corporations. For example, according to information published by the website gmoanswers.com, which is funded by some of the biggest players in the GMO seed economy, such as Syngenta, BASF, and Bayer (which acquired Monsanto in 2018), it takes some 13 years and a $130-million in research and development before a single GMO product can make it to market, and the regulatory process can take between five to seven years. The time and money invested in that alone greatly reduces the opportunity for smaller companies to get involved, resulting in a handful of companies owning the seeds and pesticides market. As reported by the Washington Post, the 2018 merger of Monsanto and Bayer in particular, combining Bayers pesticide business with Monsantos GMO portfolio, makes Bayer the largest seed and agrochemical company on earth.

It also doesnt help their cause nor endear them to the public, that in the past, companies like Monsanto and their products, have been at the centre of controversial lawsuits. One of the most recent examples being RoundUp, a weedkiller which contains glyphosate, a chemical first patented by Monsanto, until the patent expired in 2000, and now used by numerous companies. In their assessment of glyphosate, the France based International Agency for Research on Cancers (IARC), ranked glyphosate as a Group 2a carcinogen, a substance that probably causes cancer in people, as reported by reuters.com. This has led to numerous lawsuits in the US against Monsanto. RoundUp remains a best seller for Bayer, especially for GMO farmers using the companys seeds, which are modified to be resistant to the weedkiller.

Then there are the questions of what we dont yet know about the environmental impact of long-term GMO farming. A study published in 2016, studying the correlation between GMO farming and pesticide use between 1998 and 2011 in the US, found that: Over the period 19982011, our results show that GE variety adoption reduced both herbicide and insecticide use in maize, while increasing herbicide use in soybean. That is to say that when it comes to maize, the engineered seeds reduced the amount of herbicide chemicals used over the period, but with regards to soybeans, the modified seeds built up tolerance, and resulted in increased use of the chemicals.

The field of genetic modification is still very much in its early stages. There is no denying the overwhelming body of research that supports GMO crops for both economic and health reasons. Scientific research has repeatedly found GMO crops to be no less healthy or any more harmful than regular crops. However, with regards to potential for monopolistic practices, much remains to be seen.

According to Roberts, the vilification of GMO plants stems directly from this campaign against the potential takeover of agriculture by big business, rather than legitimate scientific concerns about the safety and toxicity of GMO foods. Writes Roberts: When Monsanto first tried to introduce GM crops into Europe, the Europeans became afraid that Monsanto and other big US agricultural companies were trying to take over their food supply. However, they could not ban Monsanto because most of the seeds grown in Europe came from Monsanto and had been produced by traditional methods. They decided therefore, to launch a campaign against GMOs by claiming they were dangerous and in this way, they could link GMOs with big agribusiness. This was wildly successful.

They were able to raise visions of Frankenfoods and other scary scenarios, which caused many people to become frightened by the term GMO. This turned out to be the best fundraising campaign that Greenpeace ever had. This was a campaign based on fantasy. It ignored the science available at the time and has continued to ignore the science to this day, even though we now know that GMOs pose no unusual risks. Greenpeace continues to ignore the science, ignore the potential benefits from this technology and is still trying to spread the word everywhere about the dangers of GMOs. This has been successful to a point where even now, when there is so much scientific evidence showing that GMOs are safe, that fundraising opportunities continue to overwhelm the science. DM/ML

Original post:

Here to stay and redefine: The Brave New World of GMO - Daily Maverick

Read the Rest...

‘It’s not gonna go well’: Hotez talks rodeo hopes, the need for vaccines and a looming winter surge – Houston Chronicle

§ December 11th, 2020 § Filed under Genetically Modified Humans Comments Off on ‘It’s not gonna go well’: Hotez talks rodeo hopes, the need for vaccines and a looming winter surge – Houston Chronicle

New vaccines are on the horizon but is it too late to blunt the pandemics winter surge? Might Houston fare better than the rest of Texas? And why could a traditional-method vaccine be better for kids?

To answer these questions, we once again check in with vaccine researcher Peter Hotez, one of the countrys best explainers of COVID-19 science. Hes a professor and dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, and he co-directs the Texas Childrens Hospital Center for Vaccine Development, where his lab team is developing COVID-19 vaccines.

Theres been a lot of news about vaccines recently. What are your thoughts?

Theres good news in that well have at least two vaccines that look like they have excellent efficacy. All we really knew before was from company press releases, which is never satisfactory. But it looks like the FDA has now reviewed that document for the dossier for Pfizer, and has decided to bring it in front of the VRBAC Committee, the Vaccines and Related Biologics Advisory Committee. Thats the committee that decides whether to give a vaccine the thumbs up, the green light to move forward.

From my experience, FDA would not bring it to VRBAC unless they felt pretty confident of the dossier. So itll probably get the green light, and then well start releasing our first vaccine to the public, just like theyve done in the UK. And hopefully the week after, the Moderna vaccine comes along.

But were not going to be able to vaccinate the U.S. population on the two mRNA vaccines alone. The technology is still too new, in terms of scaling up, production and a few other issues.

So were going to need other vaccines. To vaccinate a significant percentage of the U.S. population, I think well need at least four or five.

Those other vaccines are coming as well. There were issues around the AstraZeneca-Oxford vaccine, so the FDA may want to see additional trials. Therell be the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Therell be Novavax vaccine. And the vaccine from our lab looks really promising. In India its being scaled up for production and tested.

One of the advantages of our vaccine is, it might be especially suitable for kids because its a proven technology. Weve made vaccines this way for almost 40 years. That technology has been used for decades to vaccinate children against hepatitis B, so theres a known safety profile, and parents might feel more comfortable using it. Our lab is exploring how we can get our vaccine not only to low- and middle income countries, but also for use in the U.S. and Europe as well.

So this a very exciting time.

Could you explain the difference between the kind of traditional vaccine your lab is working on and the mRNA vaccines?

Ours is a very old, tested vaccine technology, the same one used to make the hepatitis B vaccine all over the world. Its a recombinant protein made through fermentation technology and yeast. You grow yeast in a bioreactor, and its genetically engineered to release the recombinant protein, and then you purify it. Its a very successful technology, one of the most widely used vaccines in kids for decades with no untoward effect. So thats exciting that we have that vaccine.

Also, our vaccine will be very low-cost, around a dollar a dose, so were hoping it really comes in to be used globally. But we dont see why it couldnt come into the U.S. at some point, particularly for kids or maybe as a booster shot if the other vaccines, like the mRNA or the adenovirus-based vaccines, do not have much in the way of durability of protection.

The RNA vaccine technology is exciting. It moves fast: You can get to the clinic very quickly, because you can make a piece of RNA in a day. Then, if you have the right packaging, you can potentially move very, very rapidly towards making a vaccine to a new virus pathogen.

The only thing we dont know is the durability of its protection. Does it protect for three months or three years or 30 years? We dont know. We also dont know if there are going to be any long-term safety issues. So far, weve not seen them in the 44,000-person trial. But when youre rolling out a brand-new technology, its hard to know what to expect. So when bumps in the road happen, as will happen in any new vaccine program, that tends to slow you down.

For instance, this morning were hearing in the U.K. that there were two individuals who got vaccinated who had what sounds like a severe allergic reaction. That didnt seem to happen in the clinical trial. So what does that mean? Well, if it was a vaccine technology we had decades of experience with, wed feel comfortable just persevering, but moving out ahead with this brand-new technology gives you pause for concern.

So even though you get a lot of upfront speed with the RNA technology, because its new you get slowed down at the tail end and thats where traditional vaccines can move quickly.

Every vaccine technology has advantages and disadvantages. Thats the rationale with Operation Warp Speed: We have several different technologies out there mRNA and adenovirus and particle vaccines, recombinant vaccines. The idea is to get multiple shots on goal in case some of those vaccines have to drop out.

On HoustonChronicle.com: 14 years later, has the HPV vaccine made a difference in Texas?

Including kids, what percentage of the U.S. population do we need to vaccinate?

We did some studies with City University in New York that show its pretty high. We need 60 to 80 percent of the population vaccinated.

There are two things youd like a vaccine to do. The first is, to keep you out of the hospital or the intensive care unit. These vaccines will do that. The second thing is, to interrupt virus transmission and thats what requires 60 to 80 percent of the population to be vaccinated.

In the U.S. we still have a significant number of people who are saying theyre holding off or waiting or may not take it at all. I think youre starting to see a number of opposing forces come into play. On the one hand, as people hear about the high levels of efficacy of these vaccines, and they see colleagues get vaccinated without any ill effects, the percentage of people who are willing to get vaccinated will increase.

On the other hand, the U.S. doesnt have any real communication plan about the vaccines, so when people hear about things like those two allergic reactions without much explanation, a lot of people are going to decide to hold off. The number of people willing to get vaccinated is going to go up and down with the news cycle.

Operation Warp Speed has never really had a communication strategy. Its been all about the scientific rigor of the studies and the integrity of the trials they have done a good job with that but there hasnt been anything resembling consistent communication. Theyre going to have to fix that. Otherwise, as bumps in the road continue, more and more people will drop out.

And then of course, youve got a very aggressive anti-vaccine movement that says stuff like that the mRNA vaccines are going to create genetically modified humans thats the new one out there. The crazier something sounds, the more people seem to believe it, like that the vaccine links with 5G networks. I cant even figure out some of the things that theyre saying. So we have to launch a counteroffensive against the anti-vaccine groups as well.

But at first, the problem wont be convincing everyone to get the vaccine, but providing enough vaccine to all the people who want it. What are your thoughts on how we should prioritize?

The priority is one, saving as many lives as we can through vaccinations; and two, stabilizing our health system.

We have exhausted nurses and physicians and respiratory techs and PAs. We have to support them better. One of the ways is to vaccinate them, so that at least when they go to work in the morning or at night, theyre going to come back the next day. Thats going to be critical to stabilize the health system. And then we should vaccinate populations at risk.

Theres a lot of emphasis right now on nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Thats appropriate. But as we start advancing at the next tier down, we have to really think about who is the greatest risk.

We keep hearing about individuals over the age of 65. Thats a little simplistic, because when you look at Hispanic, African American and Native American populations, around 35 percent of the deaths are people under the age of 65. I think whats happening is, a lot of people in their 50s and early 60s are losing their lives parents, brothers and sisters.

So I would bring that age cutoff down. I think it can make a big difference in terms of saving lives. That 65 cut off is artificial, and it basically holds for non-Hispanic whites, but not the rest of the world and not the rest of the country.

Youve said that as soon as a vaccine is approved by the FDA, you will take the first one that you can get. Do you still feel that way, even now that we see some of them hitting speed bumps?

Im ready. So any of the ones that are that are on deck, whether its the Pfizer mRNA vaccine or the Moderna mRNA vaccine or the AstraZeneca-Oxford adenovirus vaccine or the J&J adenovirus vaccine or the Novavax vaccine or our labs vaccine.

[Laughs.] Well, my first choice would be take our labs vaccine, if I could get it.

For sentimental reasons?

[Laughs.] Id have to get on a flight or two to Hyderabad. I might even do that. Well see.

But for now, if I can get one of the other vaccines, Ill take it. Why do I say that? Because they all work against the spike protein of the virus. They all work the same way, and they all build on more than a decade of research. Thats another important point.

People need to know that. This is why I hate the pharma press releases: Theyre meant for shareholders, so theyre made to inflate the companys heroism. The press releases make it sound like the companys brilliant scientists went into the lab and all by themselves came up with a vaccine in four months.

On HoustonChronicle.com: Everything you need to know about Pfizer, Moderna COVID-19 vaccines

But thats not true. This coronavirus vaccine program has been underway for 17 years. It began with the first SARS virus, the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome that came out of China and shut down Toronto back in 2003. Then the National Institutes of Health started supporting coronavirus vaccine research. My research partner and I were beneficiaries of that. We received a large grant, together with the New York Blood Center, Texas Childrens, Baylor, UTMB Galveston and Walter Reed. We developed the first prototype vaccines for coronaviruses.

And guess what? Based on our findings, with this new coronavirus, we knew that a vaccine should target the spike protein. Thats the weak link. We were able to provide proof of concept that if you immunize against the spike protein, produce virus neutralizing antibodies and some T cell responses, youll get a successful vaccine.

That decade or more of research was critical. Without that nobody could have hit the ground running. When we got the genomic sequence of the new coronavirus when the Chinese scientists put that information up on bioRxiv.org in January, the small scientific community who worked on coronaviruses looked at that and said, Hey, we got this. We now just have to modify what weve done for SARS and for MERS.

Thats why we were able to hit the ground running and move so quickly. Thats important to know because part of the misinformation that the anti-vaccine people are putting on the internet is that everything was rushed. Seventeen years is a typical timeframe for vaccines, and these vaccines are more or less going by that same playbook.

But dont vaccines usually take much longer to develop than these have? Hasnt the COVID-19 vaccines development been different than, say, development of the measles vaccine?

Lets look at measles. So measles virus was first isolated in the 50s by John Enders, Sam Katz and others from Boston Childrens Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Then it was adapted into the first prototype vaccine, which was a killed vaccine that had problems. It got refined into an attenuated vaccines in the 60s. So that was a decade of research.

My friend and colleague Paul Offit writes that he thinks the worlds record for vaccine development is four years from first isolation. Thats the mumps vaccine, so thats probably about right.

Our schistosomiasis vaccine is more typical of vaccine timeframes. Our lab started working on that in 2004, and its only now in Phase Two trials. Part of that time is due to resource constraints: It never got financed to move as quickly as we could have.

But I like to keep on pointing out that this idea that we developed the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in five months is a false narrative perpetuated by the pharma companies or out of the White House. I mean, Operation Warp Speed is a great program. Dont get me wrong. But its the culminating event of a 17 year program.

I wanted to get you to give us an overview of how the U.S., Texas and Houston are doing right now as far as the spread of COVID. What are you keeping an eye on?

Nationally, were doing terribly: 200,000 new cases a day, and 2,000 to 3,000 deaths per day. COVID-19 is now the single leading cause of death in the United States on a daily basis. ICUs are being overwhelmed. This is a public health calamity of the worst order.

By next week 300,000 Americans will have lost their lives, and the numbers will keep climbing. Well be at 400,000 by the inauguration. Thats the number of American GIs who perished in World War Two. You cannot have a worse outcome than that.

Texas, unfortunately, is one of the states worst affected. I think right now it has the largest number of COVID-19 cases of any state in the country. Were not No. 1 in deaths in part because of that terrible early epidemic in New York, where so many people died, but we may get there. Right now its looking dire in West Texas and up in the Panhandle. At the hospitals in far western Texas, El Paso, and Lubbock, its really terrible, and I would imagine its going to get pretty bad and the Dallas-Fort Worth area and in Austin.

Im hoping because of the warmer climate in Houston, where people are outdoors more in winter, maybe we wont get hit as hard. But its going up. All the numbers are in the wrong direction in terms of new cases and positivity, and now admissions and the hospitals.

One thing will help us do better: Were blessed in Houston to have the Texas Medical Center. As my friend and boss, Texas Childrens CEO Mark Wallace, says, the Texas Medical Center has a lot of heft. Were not in danger of running out of beds. But we still could have exhausted staff.

Still, I am worried about a lot of community transmission really accelerating.

Last time I checked, the Texas Medical Center calculated the rate of spread at 1.4, which seemed alarmingly high to me. Is that something we should worry about now?

That number the R-naught goes along with everything else. Never look at one number. To get the Gestalt of whats happening, you need the you need a little bit of it all. And its all going badly.

We often dont get a fully accurate picture of whats going on just by looking at the Texas Medical Center. So I talked to my friend Joseph Varon, whos at United Memorial Medical Center, a small hospital in Acres Home, a low-income neighborhood. Theyre getting hammered. So hes kind of the canary in the coal mine.

I say, Joe, so how are things going? And he says, Its bad, Peter. Things are really revving up. Thats a bad sign. So I think were in for it.

Again, Im hoping Houston is not as bad as Dallas, Fort Worth or whats been going on in the Panhandle. But I think its not gonna go well.

We have great elected leaders, Mayor Turner and in the county judge, Lina Hidalgo, have asked the state for freedom to operate to manage this thing. I think theyre frustrated by not having the full ability to do all the things they want to do.

On HoustonChronicle.com: Labors of Love: Houstonians turn passion projects into reality during lockdown

I live in Montrose. I take walks in the neighborhood with my wife Ann or sometimes alone at night. Sometimes Ill work at home the whole day without seeing anybody but Ann, our daughter Rachel and the cat, so you know, I just need to see real people, and I can get that by walking down Westheimer and all the cafes.

But I see people without masks, having their coffee or wine and smoking cigarettes, and it looks like businesses as usual.

Im conflicted. On the one hand, its calming and reassuring to see people living normal lives. Theyre trying to eke out a normal existence, to find some moments of calm and relaxation in this horrible time. But on the other hand, theres so much raging COVID-19 that anytime you see a group of people now, a certain number will have COVID, and others are catching COVID from them, and theyre going home to family members or friends who have risk factors.

We have to figure out a way to stay disciplined and keep it together for the next couple of months as vaccines arrive. Too many Texans are going to lose their lives in the next couple of months, Texans who could have perfectly normal lives once we get people vaccinated.

Thats got to be the public-health message that we keep hearing. I think well start getting that from the White House with the new administration.

And well have vaccine. So as we start vaccinating the population, both in Texas and nationally, things will get better. It wont be like a light switch the pandemic wont suddenly switch off but things will start to improve significantly Over the next few months, we wont get to 60 to 80 percent of the population vaccinated right away, but well start to get there.

What else we should be thinking about?

Just this constant reminder of the things we need to do a reminder not only to Houstonians, but to all Texans and all the U.S. Getting to 95 to 100 percent compliance on face masks. Protecting your loved ones via social distancing. Preventing those surges on the intensive care unit.

Thats got to be our priority right now. Its not going to be very nice Christmas, but thats okay. Well get through this. And well have a great Christmas next year. Maybe we can even have a have an aspirational goal towards a celebratory event in Houston.

Maybe the Houston Rodeo? Do you think well be able to have that giant event safely by May?

Oh, thats interesting. The rodeo usually opens in March, but I pushed hard to delay the opening. May is certainly better than March, though maybe not as good as pushing it back till September.

But by May, hopefully, a significant number of people will be vaccinated. Theres still going to be a significant level of transmission, so its not ideal.

Nationally, I think things will get better as well. And globally, were starting to figure out what that landscape looks like. Were realizing that some of the mRNA vaccines may not be available globally. Hopefully our labs vaccine will fill that void. Understanding what vaccines are going to be made available to low- and middle-income countries, thats going to be extremely important.

I think the U.S. will rejoin the World Health Organization and its COVAX facility. Thats really important, as well.

And then a year from now, well need to look around us and ask, How did we do so badly in this in this pandemic? What went so horribly wrong?

Its going be really important for the U.S., not to do it in an accusatory way but to understand what went wrong. I mean, we clearly know that the White House was not up to COVID-19 control. They couldnt organize themselves. They put out disinformation. But its not only the White House.

We also have to figure out what went wrong with the some of the agencies: why we missed the entry of the virus from Europe, why we couldnt organize ourselves for diagnostic testing, why we couldnt prevent that Southern surge.

Its important to look at that so that when the next pandemic comes along, we do better. The truth is, we do better with each epidemic, with every pandemic. We learned a lot from SARS in 2003, and implemented measures. We learned again from H1N1 in 2009, and from MERS and Ebola in 2014.

Each time we put new things in place. Clearly we have important things to learn from this time as well.

This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity.

Who do you want to hear from next? What questions do you have? Email me or find me on Twitter: lisa.gray@chron.com, twitter.com/LisaGray_HouTX

Lisa Gray is a senior writer on the features desk. Previously, she's held many of the Chronicle's most interesting jobs: Senior editor for digital, features enterprise editor, member of the editorial board, acting op-ed editor, columnist--and, most fun of all, founding editor of Gray Matters, the Chronicle site named "Best Blog" in Texas three years in a row.

Email her at lisa.gray@chron.com. Or follow her on Facebook, where she spends way too much time.

Go here to see the original:

'It's not gonna go well': Hotez talks rodeo hopes, the need for vaccines and a looming winter surge - Houston Chronicle

Read the Rest...

Deere’s farm version of facial recognition is coming to fields in 2021 – CNBC

§ December 11th, 2020 § Filed under Genetically Modified Humans Comments Off on Deere’s farm version of facial recognition is coming to fields in 2021 – CNBC

If it comes as a surprise that a recent government auction of 5G broadband licenses was won by agricultural giant Deere & Co. rather than AT&T or another telecom stalwart, maybe it shouldn't. Farming which over thousands of years evolved from humans pulling plows to chemical and most recently its genetic era is entering its digital age. Also referred to as precision agriculture, the changes being wrought by collection and analysis of data, on life and work in rural areas, are set to accelerate.

One example from Deere that is set to debut in the farm fields next summer combines machine vision and machine learning or, to put it in words easier to understand, think facial recognition for plants. Back in 2017, Deere acquired a company called Blue River Technology, which has been working on a way to identify individual plants and weeds. That's not an easy task when you consider that a single acre of farm can encompass thousands of plants and the heavy machine moving through the field is operating at a speeds of 10-20 mph.

AI is quickly moving into all varieties of farms and on a global basis. In China, pork farms have been using facial recognition to map and monitor pigs' faces. And from an Irish start-up to ag giants like Cargill, facial recognition of cows for dairy farms is advancing.

"Farms in these rural environments are very technologically capable, tech savvy, creating significant data each and every day during the growing season," said Jahmy Hindman, who became Deere's chief technology officer this past July, speaking at Thursday's CNBC @Work Spotlight event. "The information being created is really going into helping them be me more productive and sustainable and more precise. .... Information is really critical to making decisions in the moment, minimizing inputs farmers have to put into the business and maximizing productivity."

A worker uses a yield monitor in a Deere & Co. combine while harvesting corn at a farm in Union Springs, New York, U.S., on Saturday, Nov. 7, 2020.

Paul Frangipane | Bloomberg | Getty Images

If the AI technology works as envisioned, the primary input that would be reduced is chemical applications to kill weeds in the fields, herbicides. Instead of widespread spraying of chemicals killing everything but genetically modified plants designed to survive the application, sprayers could target individual plants recognized as being the correct targets, which could have major implications for businesses like Bayer's Monsanto, which creates chemicals and GMO crops, the most well-known being Roundup.

Hindman described the AI technology as training new neural network models to see weeds and spray only weeds in crop fields.

Getting more information to the grower at the individual plant level is a key goal for Deere.

"Think about corn or soy operations in the Midwest ... 40,000 plants per acre on a farm 2,000 acres large," Hindman said. "We are interested in being able to manage each plant over the course of its life, minimizing inputs and maximizing productivity. ... Being able to make decisions in real time is absolutely key to unlocking added economic value for growers and productivity in the agriculture space."

The Blue River Technology approach, down to the level of the individual crop plant taking pictures of plants so that while a machine is cruising it can make the decision to spray within seconds, or less is potentially the most important technology coming to the farm, according to Rob Wertheimer, an analyst with Melius Research who covers Deere.

Between seasons, farmers spray herbicides like Monsanto's Roundup on entire fields to kill everything. Deere's intention is to launch Blue River in fallow fields as the first experiment, rather than fully planted crop rows. In spring and summer, before planting, weeds have grown in empty fields and that is not as complex a task for AI as identifying targets in fields where there already are thousands of crops planted, but it is the first step in proving the technology.

"You're taking pictures of plants and training algos that need to make spraying decisions fast, in seconds, at fast speeds, 15-20 mph, and bouncing around, the sprayer bouncing around and doing it day after day for five or 10 years with no errors. That's hard," Wertheimer said.

As in many sectors, the pace of technology change on farms is occurring much faster than the industry anticipated. Wertheimer noted that only a decade ago, former Deere CEO and chairman Sam Allen thought it would be a long time before autonomous tractors took over farms, for reasons including safety issues. But with rapid improvements in self-driving technology like Lidar, as well as AI improvements, Allen changed his view within the span of a few years.

"The farmer doesn't drive much anymore," said Stephen Volkmann, a Jefferies analyst who covers Deere and compared autonomous advances in farm operations to an aircraft pilot, where today much of the flight is automated. "The farmer needs to sit in the cab and monitor, but lets the tractor drive itself."

Facial recognition is getting a little scary ... but there is no reason to think it can't be successful. See-and-spray is one of several advanced farming technologies that seem to be moving closer to an inflection point.

Stephen Volkmann

Jefferies analyst

Volkmann said the see-and-spray AI is the "sexiest" technology coming to the farm.

"I think people believe it's real," he said. "This is exactly like an autonomous car, a camera that can recognize lots of stuff and train it with AI algos and identify lots of different plants."

The challenges to making it work are numerous: plants get stepped on and leaves get bent and there are shadows created in fields, and fields are dirty places, which means reliably performing this task all the time is a challenge, and it is a task that requires a high level of success.

"Just like self-driving, they can do it 95% of the time today, but that's not good enough. You need to get to 100% to call it success. You don't want to spray the wrong chemical on the wrong plant even 5% of the time," Volkmann said.

Ultimately, there is potential for AI to learn to recognize "good" plants versus "bad" plants using a variety of factors, as well as the best locations for planting, rather than just target the right weeds for spraying.

Today, a corn farmer may get on average 170 bushels produced from an acre, though a record level of 600 bushels per acre has proven to be possible, if weather and weeds and other factors in the field, from sunlight to insects and fungus, soil nutrient characteristics and sunlight and shadow, can be analyzed to ultimately create greater crop productivity.

"There is lots of data in millions of plants and weeds," Wertheimer said.

Deere already offers ExactEmerge and ExactApply technology which were introduced over the past decade and have turned core farm tasks such as seed planting and spraying into precision agriculture machine operations, and Deere executives said on its most recent earnings call that the uptake of these technologies by farmers is accelerating.

"Facial recognition is getting a little scary ... but there is no reason to think it can't be successful," Volkmann said."See-and-spray is one of several advanced farming technologies that seem to be moving closer to an inflection point," he said, though he added it is still likely a few years out for full plant recognition technology to be commercialized.

Rural connectivity is tied to these technology efforts that Deere is focused on for its operations and the rural communities in which its farmers work and live. While the 5G licenses the company recently acquired are for its manufacturing operations allowing it to operate smart factories Hindman said there are tailwinds to bringing more broadband and 5G to rural America.

"The divide between urban and rural connectivity is an important one for us, and farmers, and also important in rural communities which they happen to work in for reasons far outside the scope of agriculture," he said.

For farmers, more investment is needed to to support data flows between Deere's own cloud computing center and farms, for reasons including the ability to remotely monitor heavy machinery on farms for preventive maintenance needs (e.g. a water pump being repaired remotely rather than someone having to travel out into the field), as well as for remote operation of equipment in the future. The effort is underway through partnerships with government and private enterprises, the Deere CTO said.

Hindman said with 5G bandwidth and the latency reduction it offers, automatically controlling machines on the farm from a remote location become a possibility.

"There's a whole host of benefits that come to society when that happens. ... We're confident the winds are at our back on that," he said of federal government support for 5G rollouts in rural parts of the country.

Hindman said hiring at the company has changed, as well as training of current employees, in line with newer efforts like the plant recognition AI and other technology.

Machine learning skill sets are in high demand, and in general, Hindman said in recent years Deere's hiring has been "significantly more indexed to software skills," while there has been concurrent upskilling of existing employees to meet the needs of the latest technology.

See the original post here:

Deere's farm version of facial recognition is coming to fields in 2021 - CNBC

Read the Rest...

« Older Entries Newer Entries »



Page 10«..9101112..2030..»