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7 Luxurious Ways To Optimise Your Bath and Shower – Hong Kong Tatler

§ January 16th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on 7 Luxurious Ways To Optimise Your Bath and Shower – Hong Kong Tatler

Its 2020theres far more to bathing than there used to be

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All bathtubs are not created equaland Baldi Home Jewels makes some of the most impressive (and expensive) in the world. The made-to-order tubs produced by the 150-year-old Florentine brand are each crafted from a single boulder of crystal found in the Amazon jungle. These rocks, each of which weighs more than 10,000kg, are transported to Italy, cut in half, then whittled into shape by hand by a team of local artisans. Tamara Ecclestone is said to have ordered a particularly opulent bath with diamond-studded gold taps. Prices are rumoured to start at around US$1 million.

Find out more atbaldihomejewels.com

See also:Healing Heat: Are Traditional Wellness Treatments Such As Onsens and Hammams Still Popular Today?

This innovative shower head by French brand Cirrus adds a soothing touch of aromatherapy to your daily routine. Fitted with replaceable capsules, which are made in France using 100% natural essential oils and organic ingredients, Cirrus three original blends are created to meet specific needs: comfort, refresh and stimulate. On top of jazzing up your shower with beautiful scents, the Cirrus Spas unique mineral filtering beads purify water and balance pH levels to give you clean, healthy skin and hair.

Available atsenseoftouch.com.hk

As its name suggests, Kohlers Real Rain shower head is designed to mimic the soothing feeling of rainfall, thanks to unique nozzle geometry that produces drops to make your shower sound, look and feel like a summer rainstorm. You can change your experience from a gentle drizzle to an exhilarating storm by selecting from varying sizes of raindrops, angles and velocity. The stylish square-shaped shower head comes in a variety of colours and finishes to suit your home.

Find out more at kohler.com

The healing effects of certain coloursa science known as chromotherapyhas been incorporated into everything from Ayurveda to traditional Chinese medicine and even medical practices in ancient Egypt. One of the best ways to incorporate it into your daily routine is with Gessis Private Wellness shower head (pictured left). With the touch of a button, you can light up your shower with one of 36 available colours, each of which is available at a range of intensities.

Find out more atgessi.com

See also:These Ancient Asian Healing Techniques Are Making A Major Comeback

Friends Wayne Chang, Allen Chang and Michael Shir were night kayaking when, suddenly, the water lit up all around them. What they witnessed was a bloom of bioluminescent planktonmicroscopic creatures that sometimes sparkle blue and green on the surface of the sea. Fascinated, the trio set out to research the phenomenon and, now, are bringing the experience to the comfort of your own bathtub. Their bath bomb, Bath Diamond, releases antioxidant-packed natural oils and bioluminescent luciferin and luciferase into your tub, creating a skin-soothing, nutrient-rich bath that glows like the sea the founders kayaked through. Just remember to turn off the lights.

Find out more atindiegogo.com

Take singing in the shower to the next level with this waterproof speaker from Bose. As well as delivering crisp sound, it has a battery that lasts up to six hours and a multi-function button to access Siri or Google Assistant, should you decide to change your tune. Whether its an energetic track to kick start your day or smooth jazz to ease you into the evening, having quality music as part of your shower routine is arguably one of lifes most underrated luxuries.

Available atlanecrawford.com.hk

Herms makes candy-coloured beach towels as intricately patterned as any of its famous silk scarves, but also quietly sells bath towels made from extra soft combed cotton. These are available plain or patterned and come in a range of neutral colours.

Available athermes.cn

See also:How Asaya At Rosewood Hong Kong Is Redefining Urbanites' Approach To Wellness

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7 Luxurious Ways To Optimise Your Bath and Shower - Hong Kong Tatler

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The Iran plane crash dealt a huge blow to Canadian universities. Here are some of the bright minds that were lost – Toronto Star

§ January 16th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on The Iran plane crash dealt a huge blow to Canadian universities. Here are some of the bright minds that were lost – Toronto Star

A university researcher developing a deeper understanding of a deadly microscopic parasite that causes a disease affecting millions. A graduate student researching how climate change affects lake systems in southern Ontario. And a college teacher who worked tirelessly to improve electrical engineering tech courses for students, whom he always welcomed to his office with a warm smile.

They are among 50 members of university and college communities across the country whose lives were cut short Wednesday when a jetliner crashed in Iran. All 176 people on board were killed, among them 138 who were en route to Canada.

Just think of the potential that was on board that plane and its been extinguished, said Paul Davidson, president of Universities Canada, which is the voice of universities nationwide. We will never get that back.

Its estimated that 46 students, researchers and faculty from 19 universities, and four from three colleges, perished when the Ukraine International Airlines jet exploded. According to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Flight 752 was likely downed by an Iranian surface-to-air missile.

This is a national tragedy for Canada, Davidson told the Star. Were hearing stories in the biggest universities and the smallest universities, in the sciences, social sciences and humanities and that adds to the sense of loss.

Its devastating in labs because these were some of the brightest, most tenacious researchers in the country, working in a wide range of fields, from advanced computer engineering to Indigenous conservation strategies.

His comments were echoed by David Lindsay, president of the Council of Ontario Universities, which represents universities provincewide.

It is difficult to fully comprehend the scale of this loss, he said. The lost research, teaching, friendship and contributions to university and student life are irreplaceable (It) will be deeply felt by our communities for years to come.

Linda Franklin, president of Colleges Ontario, noted the deep ties of the provinces colleges to their diverse communities.

They are close-knit and the devastating loss of faculty and students due to the airplane crash in Iran is felt deeply.

The Star asked members of the academic community to offer insight into some of the work pursued by their colleagues who were lost on Flight 752. These are their responses, which have been edited and condensed.

Ghanimat Azhdari, PhD student at the University of Guelph

Ghanimat had been in Iran over the December holiday break to visit family and was returning to the University of Guelph, where she was a student in my lab at the department of geography, environment and geomatics. Ghanimat was an Indigenous person who was born into the nomadic Qashqai tribe in southwestern Iran.

Like Indigenous peoples across the planet, including many First Nations, Mtis and Inuit in Canada, Ghanimat had a very strong personal relationship to her ancestral territories in Iran, consisting of vast arid grasslands, rangelands and deserts. Scientists now believe that over 80 per cent of the worlds biodiversity is found in Indigenous and tribal lands.

She had dedicated her life to protecting these places, which she would often describe to me as territories of life, as they are not just the habitat of endangered plants and animals, but are also the ancient landscapes that have sustained Indigenous peoples, like her own community, for thousands of years. Ghanimats PhD thesis was devoted to exploring the biocultural richness of Indigenous lands, such as sacred mountains and rivers, berry picking areas and places where medicinal plants are harvested.

Using participatory community mapping methods, Ghanimat had become an expert in working with local tribespeople to collect and map these critical areas of both ecological and cultural significance. She was particularly well suited for this type of research as she could easily slip between two worlds: the Indigenous world in which sophisticated ecological knowledge about plants and animals is captured within songs, language and cultural traditions and the western science world of data, satellite images and statistical analyses.

For her PhD dissertation, Ghanimat had hoped to partner with First Nations in Canada to begin mapping the biocultural richness of the boreal forest, using participatory mapping methods as well as remote sensing and geographic information systems analysis. Her first meeting with the Miawpukek First Nation in Newfoundland was scheduled for next month. In an email that she sent to me from Iran a few days ago, she described her excitement about meeting the community and her worry that her winter boots and jacket might not be warm enough for the notoriously biting Newfoundland winter.

The loss of Ghanimat Azhdari, as well as so many other similarly talented students in the Tehran air disaster, is devastating particularly for university communities across the country. The one thing that brings me a little comfort in coping with Ghanimats death is the knowledge that my dear student was a powerful and passionate young leader in defence of Indigenous peoples and their territories, and that her lifes work will continue.

Faisal Moola, Azhdaris supervisor, is an associate professor in the department of geography, environment and geomatics, University of Guelph.

Forough Khadem, recent PhD in immunology from the University of Manitoba

Dr. Khadems research focused on understanding how the immune system protects us against a deadly microscopic parasite called Leishmania. Leishmaniasis, which is the disease caused by this parasite, is prevalent in more than 70 countries. An estimated 10 to 15 million cases occur worldwide and about 500,000 new cases occur annually. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), a form of the disease that affects the liver and spleen, is the most dangerous and if untreated leads to death.

Dr. Khadem observed that Leishmania parasites hijack a host enzyme to increase the number and function of a certain type of immune cells that dampen immune response. She disrupted this enzyme and infected animals became able to clear parasites. She found that the parasites infect a special type of liver cells. Removal of these liver cells during infection or blocking the activity of this enzyme was very effective in curing leishmaniasis. Her work provided novel understandings into immunity against VL and has implications for antimicrobial immunotherapy and drug/vaccine development against leishmaniasis. These findings were published in high-impact journals.

She won several prestigious research awards and was among six individuals selected across Canada to participate in the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2018. She was a great mentor and role model to young women in science. With her passing, humanity has lost a rising star in science.

Jude Uzonna, the supervisor of Khadems doctoral research, is associate dean (research) and professor of immunology and medical microbiology at the Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba.

Mari Foroutan, PhD student at the University of Waterloo

Mari was a student in the faculty of environment and her climate change research looked at how small lake systems in southern Ontario respond to a changing climate and increasing extreme weather. Her specific expertise was on water temperature and water quality.

Mari, whose work was widely published, had established a lake observatory for this work and was developing state-of-the-art methods using field sensors, high-resolution remote sensing from drones, and numerical models to measure, monitor and predict surface temperature, thermal structure, ice cover and water quality of the lake with climate warming.

View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/could-we-actually-live-on-mars-mari-foroutan#watch

In addition to her PhD work she was also conducting projects with international collaborators looking at Earth analogues for similar features on planet Mars, such as aeolian ridges and megaripples found in deserts of Iran and Libya.

Claude Duguay is a professor of geography and environmental management at the University of Waterloo.

Hadis Hayatdavoudi, PhD student at Western University

Hadis Hayatdavoudi earned B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in electrochemistry and corrosion engineering in Shiraz, Iran, before beginning her PhD program in chemistry at Western University in 2018.

Her PhD research goal was to determine whether hydrogen atoms, a byproduct of corrosion reactions, would have an influence on the longevity of copper-coated steel containers for disposal of used nuclear fuel. The work is of interest to the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (Toronto), who are charged with ensuring the safe, permanent disposal of Canadas used nuclear reactor fuel.

Her research results are thoroughly documented and stored according to the strict quality assurance plan under which her work was carried out, and will not be lost. They will be incorporated into papers for publication in peer-reviewed journals, and Hadis will be fully acknowledged as co-author.

We have, however, lost the bright mind behind that research work, and although we have a solid group of talented young researchers carefully studying other aspects of the corrosion performance of used nuclear fuel disposal containers, as of yesterday we have nobody carrying out experiments on the role of hydrogen.

Supervisor Jamie Nol is an assistant professor in the department of chemistry at Western University.

Saeed K. Kashani, PhD student at the University of Ottawa

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Saeed was entering the fourth year of his chemistry PhD degree at the University of Ottawa. His focus was on organic synthetic: the branch of chemistry that deals with how to construct complex, valuable molecules from commercially available chemical building blocks.

In particular, Saeed was demonstrating how cutting-edge automation technology could allow chemical synthesis to be carried out more efficiently and with reduced waste compared to the current state of the art. By collaborating with pharmaceutical companies and technology experts, Saeed got the chance to achieve many of his goals since moving to Canada.

Stephen G. Newman is an associate professor in the department of chemistry and biomolecular sciences, University of Ottawa.

Razgar Rahimi, who taught electrical engineering technology at Centennial College and was a sessional lecturer at Ontario Tech University

Curriculum development takes an enormous amount of effort to synthesize a body of knowledge into easily digestible lessons. Dr. Rahimi was a very quick learner who exceeded expectations and always met deadlines. Not only did he update our electrical engineering tech courses, he made them better!

We worked on a project to modify our courses by introducing low carbon building skills an important objective that the federal government is funding to make our electrical engineering tech graduates more knowledgeable about environmentally sustainable practices.

Dr. Rahimi had a positive outlook and never complained about the tasks ahead. He always welcomed and helped students who came to his office, always generous with his time. Our electrical engineering technicians, technologists and apprentices are so much richer for knowing Razgar Rahimi.

Jorge Gruszka is a professor in the school of engineering technology and applied science at Centennial College.

Mohammad Amin Jebelli, masters student at the University of Toronto

Jebelli had practised medicine and served as a medic in Iran, after graduating from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences with a doctorate in medicine. In 2018, he came to Toronto to pursue a master of health science in translational research.

This was a young man who was quiet, gentle, soft-spoken. He was bright and clever and asked good questions and was curious about the world.

Jebelli was due to graduate from the U of T program later this year, and was studying to do a qualification exam this March so hed have the ability to practise in Canada as a doctor.

He also had an interest in entrepreneurship and in helping people in his home country of Iran, and contemplated pursuing a PhD.

Joseph Ferenbok is the translational research program director at the University of Torontos faculty of medicine.

Mojgan Daneshmand and husband Pedram Mousavi, professors of engineering at the University of Alberta

Im by no means an expert in Mojgans research areas (Im a computer engineer), but the two themes in her work were the design of novel microwave sensors for use in a wide variety of industrial and environmental applications, and the design of novel communications devices that operate at microwave and radio frequencies. Conventional cellphones (up to the LTE generation used today) use microwave frequencies; however, the next generation of cellphone technology (5G) will require the use of arrays of antennas that operate at both microwave and radio frequencies.

Its clear to me that Mojgans research on novel microwave and radio frequencies devices would likely have contributed to the development of 5G technology in Canada, as well as to the training of students and junior researchers in key technical aspects of 5G.

Pedrams research interests focused on what are called wireless sensor networks, where a multitude of physically distributed intelligent sensors use built-in flexibility (provided by flexible antenna designs and by programmable computers) to adapt to their local conditions, make useful measurements (for example, environmental measurements) and then communicate among themselves as a self-organizing network.

As an example application, such wireless sensor networks could be used to monitor the environment for, say, signs of pollution. They could also be used to provide communications capabilities in remote areas or in areas affected by natural disasters. Finally, such a network could allow autonomous vehicles to communicate among each other.

Pedram, who in his research was a communications engineer, also contributed valuable courses in management and in intellectual property that benefited the education of students in all four of the departments in the faculty of engineering Pedrams teaching benefited numerous students over the years, and he was undoubtedly contributing significantly to the establishment, growth and success of new companies in Alberta and across Canada.

The biggest loss is that both Pedram and Mojgan were delightful people, widely liked and respected by their colleagues and the students that they taught and mentored.

.

Bruce Cockburn is an associate professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering, University of Alberta.

Fareed Arasteh, PhD student at Carleton University

Fareed had a masters degree in biotechnology from Iran. His dream was to enrol in a PhD program in the field of genetics. It took him two years to get into the molecular genetics lab at Carleton University in Ottawa and enrol in a PhD program. He was working on the identification and characterization of genes that affect quality control of the gene expression process using the model fungal organism, bakers yeast. For genes to function, they need to be activated, or, as scientists like to call it, expressed. The quality of this expression is continuously regulated; mistakes in expression can lead to different conditions including cancer. For this research, the lab has secured more than $200,000 of public funding. It will take at least an additional year and a half to find and recruit another qualified graduate student to continue this work.

Ashkan Golshani is a professor of biology and biochemistry, Carleton University.

Nasim Rahmanifar, masters student at the University of Alberta

Nasim Rahmanifar received her bachelors and masters degrees in biomedical engineering from Amirkabir University of Technology in Iran.

She was admitted to a masters program in mechanical engineering at the University of Alberta in 2019, and was offered to transfer to a PhD program in 2020.

Nasims research focused on in-field assessment of the risk of pressure injury and repetitive strain injury of the shoulder in wheelchair users.

Nasims academic performance throughout her studies in Iran and Canada was exceptional, with a full-mark GPA. She was a talented and hardworking student, and a dedicated and kind team member.

Hossein Rouhani, Rahmanifars supervisor, is an assistant professor in the department of mechanical engineering, University of Alberta.

Correction Jan. 11, 2020: This article was corrected from a previous version which said Forough Khadem recieved a PhD from the University of Winnipeg. Dr. Khadem received a PhD from the University of Manitoba.

With files from Rosa Saba

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Healthcare IT Market trends research and projections – GroundAlerts.com

§ January 16th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Healthcare IT Market trends research and projections – GroundAlerts.com

The consumerization in healthcare information technology has reached a tipping point, the impact of which has been felt across healthcare IT market. The need to ensure comfort and security for patients has brought about a major transformation in the medical sphere, leading to a path-breaking intersection of IT and healthcare. The deployment of IT has equipped the healthcare industry with nanomedicine, virtual healthcare, 3D printing, robot-assisted surgery, and more. These advancements, aided by the investments by the governments worldwide, have brought about a massive change in the healthcare IT industry outlook.

The global healthcare IT market has also gained traction on account of innumerable parameters, prominent among them being, the increasing geriatric populace and the changing consumer lifestyles. Indeed, these have led to a spate of diseases worldwide, consequently surging the demand for a highly sophisticated healthcare IT network in order to lower errors in administration processes and ensure efficient medical data and patient record management.

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Consumer expectations have also changed in the last decade or so, leading to healthcare providers focusing on prioritizing efficient management of healthcare data. This has subsequently led to the implementation of innovative technologies in the medical ecosphere, augmenting the revenue graph of the global healthcare IT market. Indeed, estimates claim that healthcare IT industry is expected to exceed $441.8 billion by the year 2025.

While numerous IT solutions are deployed in the healthcare space, one of the most significant ones is that of electronic health records. Undeniably, healthcare IT industry has gained much via rapid adoption of the EHR technology by healthcare specialists in the U.S. and other economies. According to the National Electronic Health Records Survey, 2017, approximately 9 out of 10 office-based physicians had adopted any type of EHR, while certified EHRs were adopted by 4 out of 5 office-based physicians. Since 2008, the rate of EHR adoption has more than doubled from 42 percent to nearly 86 percent in 2017. The accelerated adoption of EHR will thus drive the growth graph of healthcare IT industry from electronic health records. As a matter of fact, estimates claim that EHR-based healthcare IT market size will cross $97.8 billion by 2025.

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Regionally speaking, it has been forecast that the United States will crop up as a prime growth avenue for the global healthcare IT industry, primarily driven by numerous investments in medical care infrastructure and government mandates. More than half a decade ago, The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) had mandated the adoption of information technology by healthcare providers. A substantial growth has also been recorded in terms of investments by the U.S. government in healthcare IT since 2008.

A few years ago, the U.S. government had made an investment of about $20 billion through the HITECH (Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health) Act, for setting up electronic health records. Aided by numerous government initiatives and the escalating need for an efficient healthcare management system, the U.S. healthcare IT industry is estimated to record substantial revenues by 2025.

Speaking of government initiatives, yet another regional ground touted to garner extensive proceeds in healthcare IT market is the United Kingdom. In December 2018, a new collaboration had been announced between the government and the life sciences industry, backed by a government fund worth 79 million, in order to study 5 million people and develop AI-centric diagnostic tests. Back in 2014, the UK government has also announced an investment of $5.4 billion in healthcare IT for a five-year period. It comes as no surprise therefore, that the UK healthcare IT market, powered by government initiatives, will reach $24.7 billion by the year 2025.

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With the increasing prevalence of diseases and the subsequently rising demand for a sophisticated medical infrastructure, healthcare IT market contenders have been working to bring forth a slew of advancements in their service portfolio. For instance, McKesson Corporation has recently collaborated with technology leader Navigating Cancer to provide an enhanced Patient Relationship Management (PRM) platform for oncologists.

IT aided healthcare has come a long way since its inception. With massive changes in the technological landscape, many more innovations have been touted to disrupt the healthcare space. Powered by huge investments and the incorporation of advanced technologies in medical care management, healthcare IT market is expected to chart out a lucrative growth map in the forthcoming years.

Table Of Content

Chapter 1. Methodology

1.1. Methodology

1.2. Market definition

1.3. Forecast parameters

1.4. Data sources

1.4.1. Secondary

1.4.1.1. Paid sources

1.4.1.2. Unpaid sources

1.4.2. Primary

Chapter 2. Executive Summary

2.1. Healthcare information technology industry 3600 synopsis, 2014 - 2025

2.1.1. Business trends

2.1.2. Solution trends

2.1.3. End-use trends

2.1.4. Regional trends

Chapter 3. Healthcare Information Technology Industry Insights

3.1. Industry segmentation

3.2. Industry landscape, 2014 - 2025

3.3. Industry impact forces

3.3.1. Growth drivers

3.3.1.1. Growing investment towards healthcare infrastructure development in Asia Pacific region

3.3.1.2. Growing adoption of artificial intelligence

3.3.1.3. High adoption of electronic health records in developed countries such as the U.S.

3.3.1.4. Favorable government initiatives

3.3.1.5. Increasing demand for cost-saving in healthcare delivery

3.3.2. Industry pitfalls & challenges

3.3.2.1. High cost associated with implementation and maintenance

3.3.2.2. Security and privacy concerns

3.4. Growth potential analysis

3.4.1. By solution

3.4.2. By end-use

3.5. Regulatory landscape

3.5.1. U.S.

3.5.2. Europe

3.5.3. China

3.6. Technology landscape

3.7. Porter's analysis

3.8. Competitive landscape, 2017

3.8.1. Strategy dashboard

3.9. PESTEL analysis

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Phage therapy: A new old… – ScienceBlog.com

§ January 15th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Phage therapy: A new old… – ScienceBlog.com

The fight against drug-resistant pathogens remains an intense one. While the Centers for Disease Controls (CDC) 2019 biggest threats report reveals an overall decrease in drug-resistant microbe-related deaths as compared to its previous report (2013) the agency also cautions that new forms of drug-resistant pathogens are still emerging.

Meanwhile, the options for treating infections by these germs are diminishing, confirming doctors and scientists worries about the end of the age of antibiotics.

We knew it was going to be a problem early on, said UC Santa Barbara chemistry and biochemistry professorIrene Chen. Basically as soon as penicillin was discovered, a few years later it was reported that there was a resistant organism. Thanks to factors such as horizontal gene transfer and rapid reproduction, organisms such as Gram-negative bacteria are able to evolve faster than we can produce antibiotics to control them.

So Chen and her research group are seeking alternatives to antibiotics, in a growing effort to head off the tide of incurable bacterial infections. In their work, the group has turned to bacteriophages, a naturally occurring group of viruses that colonize on bacteria.

Thats their natural function, really, to grow on and kill bacteria, said Chen, author of apaperthat appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. By taking advantage of the bacteriophages ability to home in on specific bacteria without damaging the rest of the microbiome, the researchers were able to use a combination of gold nanorods and near-infrared light to destroy even multidrug-resistant bacteria without antibiotics.

Phage therapy isnt new, Chen said. In fact, it has been used in the former Soviet Union and Europe for about a century, though they are seen largely as last-resort alternatives to antibiotics. Among the unresolved issues of phage therapy is the incomplete characterization of the phages biology a biology that could allow for unintended consequences due to the phages own rapid evolution and reproduction, as well as potential toxins the viruses may carry. Another issue is the all-or-nothing aspect of phage therapy, Chen added.

Its difficult to analyze the effect of a phage treatment, she said. You might see it completely work or you might see it completely fail, but you dont have the kind of dose response you want.

To surmount these challenges, the Chen lab developed a method of controlled phage therapy.

What we did was to conjugate the phages to gold nanorods, she explained. These phanorods were applied to bacteria on in-vitro cultures of mammalian cells and then exposed to near-infrared light.

Conjugated to phages,gold nanorods find their target: a bacterial cell wall

Photo Credit:COURTESY IMAGE

When these nanorods are photo-excited, they translate the energy from light to heat, Chen said, and that creates very high local temperatures.

The heat is enough to kill the bacteria, and it also kills the phages, preventing any unwanted further evolutions. The result is a guided missile of targeted phage therapy that also allows for dosage control. The lab found success in destroyingE. coli,P. aeruginosaandV. cholerae human pathogens that cause acute symptoms if left unchecked. They also were able to successfully destroyX. campestris, a bacteria that causes rot in plants.

In a collaboration with UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineerBeth Pruitt, the lab determined that while the heat successfully destroyed bacteria and phage, more than 80% of the mammalian cell culture underneath the bacteria biofilm survived.

Bacteria under fire: Green bacteria are alive, while the red ones are dead

Photo Credit:COURTESY IMAGE

This issue of whether it damages mammalian tissues is very important, Chen said. Work in nanotechnology and nanomedicine treating bacterial infections indicates that when its non-targeted, it really does burden the surrounding tissues.

The lab plans to investigate other possible phages to counter other bacteria, possibly engineering a photothermal method that could treat multiple bacterial infections.

Research on this study was conducted also by UCSB postdoctoral fellow Huan Peng (lead author), Raymond E. Borg and Liam P. Dow.

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Curetis Launches Unyvero LRT Panel for BAL Specimens in the U.S. – GlobeNewswire

§ January 15th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Curetis Launches Unyvero LRT Panel for BAL Specimens in the U.S. – GlobeNewswire

Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Holzgerlingen, Germany, and San Diego, CA, USA, January 14, 2020, 08:00 am CET -- Curetis N.V. (the "Company" and, together with its subsidiaries, "Curetis"), a developer of next-level molecular diagnostic solutions, today announced the U.S. launch of its Unyvero LRT BAL Lower Respiratory Tract Application Cartridge for use with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples to diagnose lower respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia. The Company received 510(k) clearance of Unyvero LRT BAL panel by the U.S. FDA on December 20, 2019, and has taken all necessary steps for an immediate U.S. commercial launch.

The LRT BAL panel will be commercially available to Curetis U.S. customers from the end of January onwards. Several prestigious medical centers, including a major cancer center and a large academic institution, have already committed to evaluate the Unyvero LRT BAL panel for routine use in patients hospitalized for suspected pneumonia.

The Unyvero LRT BAL application is the first and only FDA-cleared molecular diagnostic pneumonia panel that includes Pneumocystis jirovecii. As culture-based diagnosis of Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia (PJP) is not possible, identification of this pathogen is often based on morphological detection techniques, which are labor-intensive and time-consuming and lack sensitivity. Rapid diagnosis of PJP, which causes severe and life-threatening symptoms, is crucial in patients with a weak or suppressed immune system. Initiating the appropriate therapy even one day earlier can significantly reduce mortality in this patient group.

Pneumocystis jirovecii is a leading cause of pneumonia in immunocompromised individuals. Several features unique to Pneumocystis make its diagnosis difficult. No combination of symptoms, signs, and chest radiographic findings is diagnostic of Pneumocystis Pneumonia, the organism cannot be cultured, and its diagnosis currently relies on microscopic visualization of the characteristic cysts and/or trophic forms on stained respiratory specimens, said Richard G. Wunderink, MD, Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary Critical Care, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and Medical Director, Medical ICU, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, when the FDA cleared the test in December. Inclusion of Pneumocystis jirovecii in a rapid comprehensive molecular panel for BAL, the preferred diagnostic procedure for Pneumocystis Pneumonia, will greatly facilitate our ability to quickly diagnose and treat these patients.

Beyond Pneumocystis jirovecii, the LRT BAL panel detects a broad spectrum of clinically relevant causative agents, including atypical pathogens, as well as antibiotic resistance markers. Thereby, it provides clinicians with a valuable diagnostic tool that informs early and supports appropriate antibiotic treatment decisions in this indication.

Infections with atypical pathogens are often associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), but are not considered in the context of hospital-acquired or ventilator-associated pneumonia. Therefore, hospitalized patients usually are not tested for these organisms unless there is a suspicion of infection. Further, empiric treatment of these patients does not normally cover atypical pathogens. Unyvero LRT BAL expands the diagnostic capability of clinicians to routinely identify atypical infections that might otherwise escape detection and hence can prevent prolonged inappropriate treatment of patients.

Indiscriminate overuse and misuse of antibiotics are key drivers of dramatically spreading antibiotic resistance, a substantial global health threat. A report recently issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that drug-resistant bacteria and fungi cause almost 3 million infections and 35,000 deaths a year in the United States, meaning that antibiotic-resistant pathogens cause a serious infection every 11 seconds and a death every 15 minutes (Ref. 1).

By providing a fast and reliable solution for the rapid detection of pathogens and antibiotic resistance markers, Unyvero LRT BAL is an essential, indispensable tool for targeted antimicrobial therapy improving patient outcomes while facilitating stringent antibiotic stewardship.

Unyvero LRT had already been cleared by the U.S. FDA for tracheal aspirate samples in 2018, said Johannes Bacher, COO of Curetis. With our newly launched Unyvero LRT BAL Application Cartridge, clinicians and hospitals can now also test bronchoalveolar lavage samples. This sample type accounts for about half of the samples obtained for the diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia. As a result, our Unyvero solution is offering the most comprehensive multiplex molecular panel for the rapid diagnosis of bacteria and fungi associated with severe pneumonia. It not only enables rapid and simultaneous detection of pathogens but also offers the broadest coverage of resistance markers.

We are excited about this launch on the heels of the recent FDA clearance decision. We expect that the launch of our LRT panel for BAL samples will significantly increase the total addressable market for our Unyvero System in the U.S., said Oliver Schacht, PhD, CEO of Curetis. It will provide us with substantial opportunities to place Unyvero instruments for rapid testing of patients with suspected lower respiratory tract infections. Moreover, by providing laboratorians and clinicians with a powerful diagnostic tool to identify pathogens in lower respiratory tract infections earlier, faster and more reliably, Unyvero supports antibiotic stewardship efforts to avoid the unnecessary use of antibiotics.

###

Reference1) CDC. Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, 2019. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2019.The full 2019 AR Threats Report, including methods and appendices, is available online at http://www.cdc.gov/DrugResistance/Biggest-Threats.html.

About Curetis

Curetis N.V.s (Euronext: CURE) goal is to become a leading provider of innovative solutions for molecular microbiology diagnostics designed to address the global challenge of detecting severe infectious diseases and identifying antibiotic resistances in hospitalized patients.

Curetis Unyvero System is a versatile, fast and highly automated molecular diagnostic platform for easy-to-use, cartridge-based solutions for the comprehensive and rapid detection of pathogens and antimicrobial resistance markers in a range of severe infectious disease indications. Results are available within hours, a process that can take days or even weeks if performed with standard diagnostic procedures, thereby facilitating improved patient outcomes, stringent antibiotic stewardship and health-economic benefits. Unyvero in vitro diagnostic (IVD) products are marketed in Europe, the Middle East, Asia and the U.S.

Curetis wholly-owned subsidiary Ares Genetics GmbH offers next-generation solutions for infectious disease diagnostics and therapeutics. The ARES Technology Platform combines what the Company believes to be the most comprehensive database worldwide on the genetics of antimicrobial resistances, ARESdb, with advanced bioinformatics and artificial intelligence.

For further information, please visit http://www.curetis.com and http://www.ares-genetics.com.

Legal Disclaimer

This document constitutes neither an offer to buy nor an offer to subscribe for securities and neither this document nor any part of it should form the basis of any investment decision in Curetis.

The information contained in this press release has been carefully prepared. However, Curetis bears and assumes no liability of whatever kind for the correctness and completeness of the information provided herein. Curetis does not assume an obligation of whatever kind to update or correct information contained in this press release whether as a result of new information, future events or for other reasons.

This press release includes statements that are, or may be deemed to be, forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology, including the terms believes, estimates, anticipates, expects, intends, targets, may, will, or should and include statements Curetis makes concerning the intended results of its strategy. By their nature, forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties and readers are cautioned that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance. Curetis actual results may differ materially from those predicted by the forward-looking statements. Curetis undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise forward-looking statements, except as may be required by law.

Contact details

Curetis Contact DetailsCuretis N.V.Max-Eyth-Str. 4271088 Holzgerlingen, GermanyTel. +49 7031 49195-10pr@curetis.com or ir@curetis.comwww.curetis.com - http://www.unyvero.com

International Media & Investor InquiriesakampionDr. Ludger Wess / Ines-Regina Buth Managing Partnersinfo@akampion.comTel. +49 40 88 16 59 64Tel. +49 30 23 63 27 68

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Curetis Launches Unyvero LRT Panel for BAL Specimens in the U.S. – Yahoo Finance

§ January 14th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Curetis Launches Unyvero LRT Panel for BAL Specimens in the U.S. – Yahoo Finance

Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Holzgerlingen, Germany, and San Diego, CA, USA, January 14, 2020, 08:00 am CET -- Curetis N.V. (the "Company" and, together with its subsidiaries, "Curetis"), a developer of next-level molecular diagnostic solutions, today announced the U.S. launch of its Unyvero LRT BAL Lower Respiratory Tract Application Cartridge for use with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples to diagnose lower respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia. The Company received 510(k) clearance of Unyvero LRT BAL panel by the U.S. FDA on December 20, 2019, and has taken all necessary steps for an immediate U.S. commercial launch.

The LRT BAL panel will be commercially available to Curetis U.S. customers from the end of January onwards. Several prestigious medical centers, including a major cancer center and a large academic institution, have already committed to evaluate the Unyvero LRT BAL panel for routine use in patients hospitalized for suspected pneumonia.

The Unyvero LRT BAL application is the first and only FDA-cleared molecular diagnostic pneumonia panel that includes Pneumocystis jirovecii. As culture-based diagnosis of Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia (PJP) is not possible, identification of this pathogen is often based on morphological detection techniques, which are labor-intensive and time-consuming and lack sensitivity. Rapid diagnosis of PJP, which causes severe and life-threatening symptoms, is crucial in patients with a weak or suppressed immune system. Initiating the appropriate therapy even one day earlier can significantly reduce mortality in this patient group.

Pneumocystis jirovecii is a leading cause of pneumonia in immunocompromised individuals. Several features unique to Pneumocystis make its diagnosis difficult. No combination of symptoms, signs, and chest radiographic findings is diagnostic of Pneumocystis Pneumonia, the organism cannot be cultured, and its diagnosis currently relies on microscopic visualization of the characteristic cysts and/or trophic forms on stained respiratory specimens, said Richard G. Wunderink, MD, Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary Critical Care, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and Medical Director, Medical ICU, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, when the FDA cleared the test in December. Inclusion of Pneumocystis jirovecii in a rapid comprehensive molecular panel for BAL, the preferred diagnostic procedure for Pneumocystis Pneumonia, will greatly facilitate our ability to quickly diagnose and treat these patients.

Beyond Pneumocystis jirovecii, the LRT BAL panel detects a broad spectrum of clinically relevant causative agents, including atypical pathogens, as well as antibiotic resistance markers. Thereby, it provides clinicians with a valuable diagnostic tool that informs early and supports appropriate antibiotic treatment decisions in this indication.

Infections with atypical pathogens are often associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), but are not considered in the context of hospital-acquired or ventilator-associated pneumonia. Therefore, hospitalized patients usually are not tested for these organisms unless there is a suspicion of infection. Further, empiric treatment of these patients does not normally cover atypical pathogens. Unyvero LRT BAL expands the diagnostic capability of clinicians to routinely identify atypical infections that might otherwise escape detection and hence can prevent prolonged inappropriate treatment of patients.

Indiscriminate overuse and misuse of antibiotics are key drivers of dramatically spreading antibiotic resistance, a substantial global health threat. A report recently issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that drug-resistant bacteria and fungi cause almost 3 million infections and 35,000 deaths a year in the United States, meaning that antibiotic-resistant pathogens cause a serious infection every 11 seconds and a death every 15 minutes (Ref. 1).

By providing a fast and reliable solution for the rapid detection of pathogens and antibiotic resistance markers, Unyvero LRT BAL is an essential, indispensable tool for targeted antimicrobial therapy improving patient outcomes while facilitating stringent antibiotic stewardship.

Story continues

Unyvero LRT had already been cleared by the U.S. FDA for tracheal aspirate samples in 2018, said Johannes Bacher, COO of Curetis. With our newly launched Unyvero LRT BAL Application Cartridge, clinicians and hospitals can now also test bronchoalveolar lavage samples. This sample type accounts for about half of the samples obtained for the diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia. As a result, our Unyvero solution is offering the most comprehensive multiplex molecular panel for the rapid diagnosis of bacteria and fungi associated with severe pneumonia. It not only enables rapid and simultaneous detection of pathogens but also offers the broadest coverage of resistance markers.

We are excited about this launch on the heels of the recent FDA clearance decision. We expect that the launch of our LRT panel for BAL samples will significantly increase the total addressable market for our Unyvero System in the U.S., said Oliver Schacht, PhD, CEO of Curetis. It will provide us with substantial opportunities to place Unyvero instruments for rapid testing of patients with suspected lower respiratory tract infections. Moreover, by providing laboratorians and clinicians with a powerful diagnostic tool to identify pathogens in lower respiratory tract infections earlier, faster and more reliably, Unyvero supports antibiotic stewardship efforts to avoid the unnecessary use of antibiotics.

###

Reference1) CDC. Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, 2019. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2019.The full 2019 AR Threats Report, including methods and appendices, is available online at http://www.cdc.gov/DrugResistance/Biggest-Threats.html.

About Curetis

Curetis N.V.s (CURE.NX) goal is to become a leading provider of innovative solutions for molecular microbiology diagnostics designed to address the global challenge of detecting severe infectious diseases and identifying antibiotic resistances in hospitalized patients.

Curetis Unyvero System is a versatile, fast and highly automated molecular diagnostic platform for easy-to-use, cartridge-based solutions for the comprehensive and rapid detection of pathogens and antimicrobial resistance markers in a range of severe infectious disease indications. Results are available within hours, a process that can take days or even weeks if performed with standard diagnostic procedures, thereby facilitating improved patient outcomes, stringent antibiotic stewardship and health-economic benefits. Unyvero in vitro diagnostic (IVD) products are marketed in Europe, the Middle East, Asia and the U.S.

Curetis wholly-owned subsidiary Ares Genetics GmbH offers next-generation solutions for infectious disease diagnostics and therapeutics. The ARES Technology Platform combines what the Company believes to be the most comprehensive database worldwide on the genetics of antimicrobial resistances, ARESdb, with advanced bioinformatics and artificial intelligence.

For further information, please visit http://www.curetis.com and http://www.ares-genetics.com.

Legal Disclaimer

This document constitutes neither an offer to buy nor an offer to subscribe for securities and neither this document nor any part of it should form the basis of any investment decision in Curetis.

The information contained in this press release has been carefully prepared. However, Curetis bears and assumes no liability of whatever kind for the correctness and completeness of the information provided herein. Curetis does not assume an obligation of whatever kind to update or correct information contained in this press release whether as a result of new information, future events or for other reasons.

This press release includes statements that are, or may be deemed to be, forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology, including the terms believes, estimates, anticipates, expects, intends, targets, may, will, or should and include statements Curetis makes concerning the intended results of its strategy. By their nature, forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties and readers are cautioned that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance. Curetis actual results may differ materially from those predicted by the forward-looking statements. Curetis undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise forward-looking statements, except as may be required by law.

Contact details

Curetis Contact DetailsCuretis N.V.Max-Eyth-Str. 4271088 Holzgerlingen, GermanyTel. +49 7031 49195-10pr@curetis.com or ir@curetis.comwww.curetis.com - http://www.unyvero.com

International Media & Investor InquiriesakampionDr. Ludger Wess / Ines-Regina Buth Managing Partnersinfo@akampion.comTel. +49 40 88 16 59 64Tel. +49 30 23 63 27 68

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A New Old Therapy – The UCSB Current

§ January 14th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on A New Old Therapy – The UCSB Current

The fight against drug-resistant pathogens remains an intense one. While the Centers for Disease Controls (CDC) 2019 biggest threats report reveals an overall decrease in drug-resistant microbe-related deaths as compared to its previous report (2013) the agency also cautions that new forms of drug-resistant pathogens are still emerging.

Meanwhile, the options for treating infections by these germs are diminishing, confirming doctors and scientists worries about the end of the age of antibiotics.

We knew it was going to be a problem early on, said UC Santa Barbara chemistry and biochemistry professor Irene Chen. Basically as soon as penicillin was discovered, a few years later it was reported that there was a resistant organism. Thanks to factors such as horizontal gene transfer and rapid reproduction, organisms such as Gram-negative bacteria are able to evolve faster than we can produce antibiotics to control them.

So Chen and her research group are seeking alternatives to antibiotics, in a growing effort to head off the tide of incurable bacterial infections. In their work, the group has turned to bacteriophages, a naturally occurring group of viruses that colonize on bacteria.

Thats their natural function, really, to grow on and kill bacteria, said Chen, author of a paper that appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. By taking advantage of the bacteriophages ability to home in on specific bacteria without damaging the rest of the microbiome, the researchers were able to use a combination of gold nanorods and near-infrared light to destroy even multidrug-resistant bacteria without antibiotics.

Phage therapy isnt new, Chen said. In fact, it has been used in the former Soviet Union and Europe for about a century, though they are seen largely as last-resort alternatives to antibiotics. Among the unresolved issues of phage therapy is the incomplete characterization of the phages biology a biology that could allow for unintended consequences due to the phages own rapid evolution and reproduction, as well as potential toxins the viruses may carry. Another issue is the all-or-nothing aspect of phage therapy, Chen added.

Its difficult to analyze the effect of a phage treatment, she said. You might see it completely work or you might see it completely fail, but you dont have the kind of dose response you want.

To surmount these challenges, the Chen lab developed a method of controlled phage therapy.

What we did was to conjugate the phages to gold nanorods, she explained. These phanorods were applied to bacteria on in-vitro cultures of mammalian cells and then exposed to near-infrared light.

Conjugated to phages,gold nanorods find their target: a bacterial cell wall

Photo Credit: COURTESY IMAGE

When these nanorods are photo-excited, they translate the energy from light to heat, Chen said, and that creates very high local temperatures.

The heat is enough to kill the bacteria, and it also kills the phages, preventing any unwanted further evolutions. The result is a guided missile of targeted phage therapy that also allows for dosage control. The lab found success in destroying E. coli, P. aeruginosa and V. cholerae human pathogens that cause acute symptoms if left unchecked. They also were able to successfully destroy X. campestris, a bacteria that causes rot in plants.

In a collaboration with UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineer Beth Pruitt, the lab determined that while the heat successfully destroyed bacteria and phage, more than 80% of the mammalian cell culture underneath the bacteria biofilm survived.

Bacteria under fire: Green bacteria are alive, while the red ones are dead

Photo Credit: COURTESY IMAGE

This issue of whether it damages mammalian tissues is very important, Chen said. Work in nanotechnology and nanomedicine treating bacterial infections indicates that when its non-targeted, it really does burden the surrounding tissues.

The lab plans to investigate other possible phages to counter other bacteria, possibly engineering a photothermal method that could treat multiple bacterial infections.

Research on this study was conducted also by UCSB postdoctoral fellow Huan Peng (lead author), Raymond E. Borg and Liam P. Dow.

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Injectable Nanomedicines Market Expansion to be Persistent During 2018 to 2027 – Food & Beverage Herald

§ January 14th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Injectable Nanomedicines Market Expansion to be Persistent During 2018 to 2027 – Food & Beverage Herald

The Injectable Nanomedicines Market reached ~US$ xx Mn in 2019 and is anticipated grow at a CAGR of xx% over the forecast period 2018 to 2027. The business intelligence study of the Injectable Nanomedicines Market covers the estimation size of the market both in terms of value (Mn/Bn USD) and volume (x units). In a bid to recognize the growth prospects in the Injectable Nanomedicines Market, the market study has been geographically fragmented into important regions that are progressing faster than the overall market.

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This post was originally published on Food and Beverage Herald

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Injectable Nanomedicines Market Expansion to be Persistent During 2018 to 2027 - Food & Beverage Herald

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Most engineered nanoparticles enter tumours through cells, not between them – U of T Engineering News

§ January 13th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Most engineered nanoparticles enter tumours through cells, not between them – U of T Engineering News

Researchers from U of T Engineering have discovered that an active, rather than passive, process dictates which nanoparticles enter solid tumours. The finding upends previous thinking in the field of cancer nanomedicine and points toward more effective nanotherapies.

The prevailing theory in cancer nanomedicine an approach that enables more targeted therapies than standard chemotherapy has been that nanoparticles mainly diffuse passively into tumours through tiny gaps between cells in the endothelium, which lines the inner wall of blood vessels that support tumour growth.

The researchers previously showed thatless than one percent of nanoparticle-based drugs typically reach their tumour targets. In the current study, the team found that among nanoparticles that do penetrate tumours, more than 95 percent pass through endothelial cells not between gaps among those cells.

Our work challenges long-held dogma in the field and suggests a completely new theory, saysAbdullah Syed, a co-lead author on the study and postdoctoral fellow in the lab ofWarren Chan, a professor at theInstitute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering(IBBME) and theDonnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research.

The study was published today in Nature Materials.

We saw many nanoparticles enter the endothelial cells from blood vessels and exit into the tumour in various conditions. Endothelial cells appear to be crucial gatekeepers in the nanoparticle transport process.

Syed compares nanoparticles to people trying to get into popular restaurants on a busy night. Some restaurants dont require a reservation, while others have bouncers who check if patrons made reservations, he says. The bouncers are a lot more common than researchers thought, and most places only accept patrons with a reservation.

The researchers established that passive diffusion was not the mechanism of entry with multiple lines of evidence. They took more than 400 images of tissue samples from animal models, and saw few endothelial gaps relative to nanoparticles. They observed the same trend using 3D fluorescent imaging and live-animal imaging.

Similarly, they found few gaps between endothelial cells in samples from human cancer patients.

The group then devised an animal model that completely stopped the transportation of nanoparticles through endothelial cells. This allowed them to isolate the contribution of passive transport via gaps between endothelial cells, which proved to be miniscule.

The researchers posit several active mechanisms by which endothelial cells might transport nanoparticles into tumours, including binding mechanisms, intra-endothelial channels and as-yet undiscovered processes, all of which they are investigating.

Meanwhile, the results have major implications for nanoparticle-based therapeutics.

These findings will change the way we think about delivering drugs to tumours using nanoparticles, says Shrey Sindhwani, also a co-lead author on the paper and an MD/PhD student in Chans lab. A better understanding of the nanoparticle transport phenomenon will help researchers design more effective therapies.

The research included collaborators from the Department of Physics (University of Toronto), Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (New York, USA) and the University of Ottawa. The study was funded by the Canada Research Chairs Program, Canadian Cancer Society, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, and Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

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Most engineered nanoparticles enter tumours through cells, not between them - U of T Engineering News

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Having Your Pathology and Eating It Too – Pager Publications, Inc.

§ January 13th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Having Your Pathology and Eating It Too – Pager Publications, Inc.

They say you are what you eat. A couch potato. A meathead. A breadwinner. Just as our vernacular has embraced the language of food to describe people, so too has the medical community used such language to describe disease. A long tradition of examining human bodies has spurred an extensive list of food-named pathologies the peau dorange of inflammatory breast cancer, the blueberry muffin rash of a baby with congenital cytomegalovirus, the cauliflower ear of a varsity wrestler with repetitive head trauma. Food eponymophilia is a curious phenomenon in medicine, particularly in medical education.

In a recent review article on the subject, Drs. Mourouguessine Vimal and Anandabaskar Nishanthi list almost 100 distinct food eponyms within pathology. Some are based on microscopic appearance, such as the coffee bean nuclei of papillary thyroid cancer or the oat cell carcinoma of the lung. Others are related to gross appearance, such as the chocolate ovarian cyst or the honeycomb lung of pulmonary fibrosis. Why is it that pathologists gravitate toward these culinary metaphors? Drs. Vimal and Nishanthi note that pathologists often hunt for clues To make this tedious task more acceptable and more convenient, pathological findings are usually compared with food.

Food names in pathology are particularly useful for undergraduate medical education because medical students often struggle with pathology at first. I spoke to Dr. Vania Zayat, Assistant Professor of Pathology at the University of Central Florida College of Medicine, who particularly likes the fried egg cells of a seminoma. She writes, The histology of it really looks exactly like a fried egg. When I describe it to students as such, it makes it so much easier to visualizeespecially if it is someone with no histology background that just sees everything blue and pink. Dr. Zayat recognizes that first- and second-year medical students often have no prior experience in pathology and may find it daunting. Even those familiar with pathology may be burdened with the bulk of new information that accompanies the preclinical years of medical school.

In an article from The American Journal of Medicineentitled Diagnostic Utility of Food Terminology: Culinary Clues for the Astute Diagnostician, Dr. Nicholas Mark and others concur that analogies add flavor, provide a lingua franca for description, and offer a mnemonic. Presenting medicine in food descriptors makes a boundless field easier to digest. In other words, medicine is difficult enough as it is, with cumbersome words like hepatobiliary tree, gastrocnemius and telangiectasia.

Dr. Zayat believes that adding humor makes the field more enjoyable, which is especially true for students who are new to the world of medicine. Naming pathology items after foods makes concepts easily accessible, familiar and relatable. When you tell someone it looks like a cauliflower or a coffee bean, for example, Dr. Zayat writes in an email, then they start relating to it more It makes a powerful memory aid and assists in making a rapid diagnosis.

I also spoke to Dr. Stephen Geller, Chairman Emeritus of Pathology at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles, California, who suggests that the tradition of using food to name pathology highlights how ancient the field really is. In the pre-science years of medicine, he writes, when photography did not exist, authors needed something dramatic to help them portray findings. Before the internet and electronic medical records, descriptive language was necessary to communicate pathology to surgeons and other clinicians successfully. These descriptions were crucial for educating the next generation of doctors and have remained a staple long after the advancement of technology.

Dr. Geller, who is also Professor of Pathology at University of California, Los Angeles and Weill Cornell, recognizes the limitations of food eponyms in modern medical education. What may be a familiar food to one student may be foreign and therefore unrecognizable to a student from a different cultural and culinary background. For example, many students have not seen or consumed the grains used to describe millet seed tuberculosis or sago spleen.

Dr. Geller also stresses that even if [students] know the foods, they may not visualize the change unless it is explained. For example, bread-and-butter pericarditis is not named simply for a piece of buttered bread; it is actually named for the way bread appears after both sides are buttered, placed together and pulled apart, which is significantly more complicated to visualize. Dr Geller goes on to note that teachers who use obscure eponyms, such as caseous necrosis, should explain the origins for the terms. Unless you alert the student, he warns, he or she may think of Brie or Velveeta instead of cottage cheese or pot cheese.

However, food does remain a universal language. Dr. Mark and others argue, Although many have never seen a nutmeg, the description of nutmeg liver remains apt and, importantly, memorable. The food eponym as a mnemonic is powerful in its descriptive capability, even if the food itself is unfamiliar.

Physicians and physicians-in-training experience the human body in a grossly tangible way. I distinctly remember a cold, gray morning in the anatomy lab when I was gently flaying the skin off of a cadaver in order to expose the sinewy tendons of the upper extremities. This is how I pull the fat off a piece of chicken, one of my classmates said, a statement that reinforced the deeply wondrous recognition that we are all organic, all mortal. After all, is the fat under our skin much different than the fat under the skin of a chicken?

Food indeed is the one of the only things that we experience with all of our senseswe appreciate texture, smell, aesthetic in our food just as we appreciate these elements in the human body. What else besides food can we truly experience as viscerally as we experience the inner workings of the human body and the diseases that ravage us? It is no surprise, therefore, that food is the natural metaphor the obvious comparison for any physician examining the human condition.

Writer-in-Training

UCF College of Medicine

Christina Seto is a member of the Class of 2021 at University of Central Florida College of Medicine. She received her undergraduate education at Barnard College of Columbia University in New York, where she majored in both English and Neuroscience & Behavior, and minored in Classics. She is originally from Los Angeles, CA. She is interested in medical humanities and does research in narrative medicine. In her spare time, she writes a food blog entitled Brunch with Bear, inspired by her severe food allergies.

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Smart Polymers Market Will Generate Massive Revenue in Coming Years – Instanews247

§ January 13th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Smart Polymers Market Will Generate Massive Revenue in Coming Years – Instanews247

AMA Research added a comprehensive research document of 200+ pages on Smart Polymers market with detailed insights on growth factors and strategies. The study segments key regions that includes North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific with country level break-up and provide volume* and value related cross segmented information by each country. Some of the important players from a wide list of coverage used under bottom-up approach are Covestro AG (Germany),BASF SE (Germany),SABIC (Saudi Arabia),Akina, Inc. (United States),AkzoNobel (Netherlands),Nippon Shokubai (Japan),Advanced Polymer Materials Inc. (Canada),Lubrizol Corporation (United States),Nexgenia Corporation (United States),SMP Technologies Inc. (Japan),Evonik Industries (Germany),Huntsman Corporation (United States),BCMaterials (Spain)

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Smart polymeric materials respond by large changes due to small changes in the environment. The smart polymers undergo fast and reversible changes in the microstructure from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic state that are triggered by small stimuli in the environment. The changes are apparent at the microscopic level as precipitate formation from a solution accompanied by phase separation from aqueous solution or order of magnitude changes in the hydrogel size. This old phenomenon is reversible, the system returning to its initial state when the trigger is removed. Physical changes include change in temperature, ionic strength and electromagnetic radiation.

Market Segmentation:by Type (PH Sensitive, Thermo-Responsive Polymers, Dual Stimuli-Responsiveness, Phase Sensitive, Light Sensitive, Others (Magnetic sensitive, Multi stimuli Responsive)), Application (Biotechnology and Medicine, Automotive, Textile, Electrical & Electronics), Distribution Channel (Online, Offline)

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Highlights of Influencing Trends:

Increasing Awareness about Environment Compatible Products

Innovative Use of Smart Polymers in the Automobile Industry

Market Growth Drivers:

Increasing Consumption in Biomedical Applications

Growing Need for Efficient Technologies over the Existing Ones

Rising necessity to Escalate Drug Delivery System

Restraints:

Huge Investment Involved in Research and Development

Opportunities:

Growth in Technological Advancement for Biomedical Application

Challenges:

Difficult to Load with Drugs and Cells

Usually the Smart Polymers are Mechanically Weak

View Detailed Table of Content @ https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/reports/31151-global-smart-polymers-market-1

Country level Break-up includes:North America (United States, Canada and Mexico)Europe (Germany, France, United Kingdom, Spain, Italy, Netherlands, Switzerland, Nordic, Others)Asia-Pacific (Japan, China, Australia, India, Taiwan, South Korea, Middle East & Africa, Others)

* Customized Section/Chapter wise Reports or Regional or Country wise Chapters are also available.

Extracts from TOC

1 Study Coverage

Industry Definition

..

2 Executive Summary

Global Smart Polymers Market Size (2014-2025) by Revenue, Production*, Growth rate

Analysis of Competitive Landscape Insights on Market Development Scenario

3 Market Size by Manufacturers [Market Share, Global Rank etc]

4 Global Smart Polymers Production, Consumption by Regions (2014-2025)

5 Market Size by Type

Global Smart Polymers Revenue by Type

Global Smart Polymers Volume by Type

Global Smart Polymers Price by Type

6 Market Size by Application (2014-2025)

Global Smart Polymers Breakdown Data by Revenue, Volume

7 Manufacturers Profiles

8 Value Chain and Sales Channels Analysis

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A Pharma Startup Launches With $200 Million In Funding And A Strategy To Make Drugs Faster, Cheaper – Forbes

§ January 12th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on A Pharma Startup Launches With $200 Million In Funding And A Strategy To Make Drugs Faster, Cheaper – Forbes

Getty

EQRx wants to do for the pharmaceutical industry what Southwest did for air travel, says its president Melanie Nallicheri. They didnt reinvent the airplane, she says, but they reassembled the experience, lowered the cost.

Thats the philosophy of the new Cambridge, Massachusetts-based drug company started by biotech entrepreneur Alexis Borisy and some of his former colleagues at cancer diagnostics company Foundation Medicine, including Nallicheri. Their startup EQRX came out of stealth on Sunday with $200 million in funding from Andreessen Horowitz, ARCH Venture Partners and GV, and an ambitious goal to develop ten new medications in the next ten years. They plan to do this by focusing exclusively on known biological targets and relying heavily on technology.

We want to get great new medicines to people and society in a sustainable method, says Borisy, CEO at EQRx and a former partner at biotech investor Third Rock Ventures, says. In a lot of ways, this is a very simple but perhaps very provocative idea.

Biological targets are at the heart of drug development; they are the proteins, nucleic acids and other microscopic bits that drugs bind to in order to become activated within the body. Some pharma companies search for new biological targets and then develop drugs based on those findings. EQRx says it will cut costs and accelerate development by focusing only on diseases that already have known targets.

Borisy says each drug they create will still cost several hundred million dollars to develop, but by going after known targets with cutting-edge technology including artificial intelligence our probability of success will be much much higher. The company intends to offer new medications for less than the price of traditional pharmaceutical companies, and market directly to payers and providers instead of consumers.

The company wouldnt provide details on what diseases it will target first, only that they will focus on small molecule and biologic drugs.

Borisy, a chemist turned serial biotech entrepreneur, has a proven track record. He previously cofounded Foundation Medicine, which was acquired by Roche for more than $3 billion, as well as Blueprint Medicines, which won its first FDA approval last week for a drug that treats a rare gastrointestinal cancer. He was also a cofounder of Tango Therapeutics and Relay Therapeutics, which have raised $55 million and $520 million respectively.

Several investors who had previously backed Borisys ventures or worked closely with him are behind the new company, including Section 32 (founded by Google Ventures founder Bill Maris), GV, ARCH Venture Partners and Andreessen Horowitz.

The goal to bring ten new products to the market over the next ten years, while also decreasing the costs of these therapies by more than half, could have a very meaningful and long-term impact on our healthcare system, says Mike Pellini, managing partner at Section 32, and a previous CEO of Foundation Medicine.

American drug pricing, always a contentious topic, has reached a fever pitch. Patients are really feeling economic pressure when they get sick, says Peter Bach, director of the Drug Pricing Lab at Memorial Sloan Kettering and a cofounder of the company alongside Borisy, Nallicheri and former Roche chief medical officer Sandra Horning. In a 2019 testimony before the Senate Finance committee, Bach discussed how drug prices significantly increase as they wind through the supply chain to the benefit of everyone except patients.

If the EQRx model works, the lower price tag could help drive down drug prices across the industry. Ive yet to see an area in terms of consumer choice that has not benefited from radical price competition, says Jacob Sherkow, a professor of bioscience patent law at New York Law School. We want competition in the biopharmaceutical space for the advantage of patients.

Just because the drugs are cheaper, however, doesnt mean they will be preferred. As Matt Herper points out at STAT, the idea of fast follow drugs has been around for decades, but some physicians are reluctant to stray from mainstay medications. On the other hand, most of these drugs match the price of their competitors and dont undercut them, as Borisy is proposing.

Pharmaceutical companies are notoriously litigious, but Borisy believes his company will be safe from patent infringement lawsuits. Patents have become much narrower, he says, and you really cant protect, in most cases, a biological target.

He does expect that some of the major pharmaceutical companies will be unhappy with EQRxs pricing. But, he says, I thought thats what capitalism is supposed to be.

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How wildfire smoke affects pets and other animals – Salon

§ January 12th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on How wildfire smoke affects pets and other animals – Salon

Catastrophic fires across the globe are increasing in both frequency and magnitude. The bushfires in Australia, fuelled by heatwaves and drought, have burned more than 10.7 million hectares, an area larger than Iceland.

Over one billion animals are estimated to have died in the Australian bushfires so far. This loss of life is devastating. Horses, dogs and other domestic animals are also being affected by the smoke generated by the wildfires.

As veterinarians who have cared for small animals following the California wildfires and researched the impacts of wildfires on horses in Canada, we have some perspective on how smoke can harm companion animals and what people can do to protect the animals in their care.

What is smoke?

The composition of smoke depends on what is being burned. The smoke from a house fire or a barn fire will contain different compounds than the smoke from wildfires or bushfires.

When an animal inhales smoke, it brings a combination of toxic gases, such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide, and particulate matter, a mixture of small liquid and solid particles, into its throat, nose and lungs.

Smoke inhalation can damage the respiratory tract in multiple ways; it can cause burns and lead to physical irritation, causing the airway to swell and become blocked.

Toxic gases can impair oxygen delivery and lead to death. Animals with immediate and close exposure to fires, such as barn or house fires, face this risk.

Exposure to bushfires or wildfires results in a sustained, lower-dose exposure to smoke. The major concern here is particulate matter. Very small particulate matter (less than four microns in diametre) can bypass the bodys natural filters and reach the lower airways.

Smoke inhalation in horses

Our relationship with horses is unique in that they bridge the gap between livestock and companion animals. As athletic animals, air quality impacts horses capacity to perform. The financial ramifications of impaired performance is not insignificant, given the economic impact of the horse industry in multiple countries.

Horses have a huge lung capacity. A horse moves more than 2,000 litres of air through its lungs every minute during strenuous exercise. With this air, horses also inhale a large number of pollutants, which is drastically increased during fires.

In 2018, Calgary was smothered in wildfire smoke for more than six weeks, with poor air quality warnings issued daily. During this period, we studied the impact of poor air quality on exercise performance in polo horses that were at a maintenance level of fitness at the end of the competition season. They continued the same training program throughout the trial, so all results are due to the improved conditions and not a conditioning effect.

Every horse involved in the study exhibited coughing at rest and during exercise, with owners complaining of decreased performance.

We performed a procedure called a lung wash on these horses to retrieve cells and particulate matter from their lungs. Every horse in the study showed inflammation of the respiratory tract. We also found large amounts of microscopic pollens and other debris trapped in the cells. These findings are diagnostic of asthma in horses, and were also commonly seen by veterinarians working in the affected area.

We also wanted to know how much the performance of these horses improved after prolonged smoke exposure. The gold standard technique to evaluate athletic performance is the measurement of maximum oxygen consumption, also known as VO2max.

After 2.5 weeks of improved air quality, horses had a 15 per cent increase in speed, as well as a 13.2 per cent increase in VO2max, compared to those measures on the first day of improved air quality. To put this into context, training two-year-old racehorses for eight weeks has been reported to result in a 6.7 per cent improvement in VO2max.

How to keep animals safe

There are many guidelines available for people when air quality is poor, but very little information for pet owners.

The air quality index (AQI) is used in Australia and the United States. The AQI is a single number presented on a scale of 0-500, ranging from excellent air quality to the most hazardous air pollution. Canada uses the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI), using a scale from 1 to 10.

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation reported several regions where AQIs had surpassed 500 in December 2019. Wildfires in northern Alberta in 2018 sent AQHI index past 11 in Calgary in May 2019.

Stay indoors

Where possible, animals should be kept indoors when the AQI is greater than 150 or AQHI is 10+ for multiple days in a row to reduce exposure to small particulate matter. The environment matters, however. For example, a dog in a tightly sealed home will have less exposure to airborne irritants than a horse in a stable.

Like human asthmatics, staying indoors might not prevent symptoms in animals with pre-existing respiratory conditions, especially when smoke persists for greater than five days. In addition, brachycephalic breeds such as pugs and bulldogs are likely to have a reduced tolerance to smoke.

Reduce outdoor physical activity

When animals exercise, they increase the amount of air they inhale, which increases the deposition of particles deep in the lungs.

Based on guidelines from multiple regulatory bodies and associations, we recommend limiting outdoor exercise in animals when smoke is visible. Moderate to intense exercise should be reduced when there is a high or very high risk rating (AQI exceeding 100; AQHI greater than 7). We recommend cancelling events (such as a Thoroughbred race) when there is a very high risk rating (AQI greater than 150 or an AQHI of 10+).

Theres every indication that fire seasons are going to become longer and more frequent. When smoke starts to blanket the land, remember there are simple things you can do to protect the respiratory health of both you and your pets.

This is a corrected version of a story originally published on Jan. 8, 2020. The earlier story included a photo that showed the breakdown of blood components instead of the inflammatory cells, debris and pollens in a horses lungs after exposure to bushfire smoke.

Stephanie Laura Bond, Postdoctoral Associate, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary; Laura Osborne, Adjunct associate, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, and Renaud Leguillette, Professor, Calgary Chair in Equine Sports Medicine, DVM, PhD, Dipl.ACVIM, Dipl. ACVSMR, University of Calgary

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license.

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Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) Market Strategies, Major Industry Participants, Marketing Channels and Forecast To 2015 2021 – Citi Blog…

§ January 12th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) Market Strategies, Major Industry Participants, Marketing Channels and Forecast To 2015 2021 – Citi Blog…

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As per the report, the Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) Market is poised to grow at a CAGR of ~XX% during the assessment period primarily driven by a growing focus on product innovation, a surge in demand for the Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) in the developed regions, and potential opportunities in the developing regions.

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Key players in the global nanomedicine market include: Abbott Laboratories, CombiMatrix Corporation, GE Healthcare, Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Johnson & Johnson, Mallinckrodt plc, Merck & Company, Inc., Nanosphere, Inc., Pfizer, Inc., Celgene Corporation, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., and UCB (Union chimique belge) S.A.

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Technion Researcher Seeks to Cure Cancer, and a Shrimp Plague – Algemeiner

§ January 12th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Technion Researcher Seeks to Cure Cancer, and a Shrimp Plague – Algemeiner

Metastatic Melanoma cancer cells: Photo: National Institutes of Health via Wikicommons.

CTech Avi Schroeders lab at the Technion Israel Institute of Technology is tiny but mighty. Thirty researchers crowd it daily, covering areas such as biology, chemistry, medicine, pharmaceuticals, and even mechanical engineering. The lab is part of the chemical engineering faculty, but the researchers here were handpicked from different departments to serve the labs interdisciplinary mission. The content of the multitude of test tubes here could one day result in life-saving medication for a variety of conditions. Until then, the lab has already birthed several innovations that matured into business ventures: Schroeder and his team are involved in four such companies based on the labs scientific breakthroughs, ranging from using elephant protein to cure cancer to personalizing chemotherapy.

At 43, Schroeder is a research phenomenon. He completed his chemical engineering PhD at the age of 33, continued to a post-doctorate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and by the age of 36 was one of Israels youngest professors. Seven years ago, he set up one of the countrys leading nano-medicine labs. His primary tools are liposomes vesicles that can be used as a drug delivery system thanks to their ability to encapsulate hydrophilic or lipophilic drugs.

His lifes work is to advance liposome-based cancer treatments. While theres still work to do on that front, Schroeders innovations to date have brought on a surprising twist for the kosher-keeping, yarmulke-wearing yeshiva graduate: for the past few years, he has been busy curing that very unkosher crustacean, the shrimp.

To his mother, Schroeder initially said he was working on a cure for cancer, which was a white lie in Hebrew, the same word is used for both cancer and crab. He considers himself a liberal person, one who doesnt care about what other people put on their plates, he said. The important thing for me is that I am saving a crucial food source for many people. Indeed, people here sometimes tease me about the fact that I dont know how tasty shrimp is and about what Im losing out on, but I dont care about that.

January 12, 2020 1:21 pm

The connection between Schroeder and shrimp was accidental, the result of his specialization in drug delivery methods. Six years ago, he gave a lecture at Israeli pharmaceutical company Protalix BioTherapeutics, where he met molecular biologist Shai Ufaz, then a Protalix employee and today a business partner and the CEO of their joint company ViAqua Therapeutics.

Ufaz found the lecture enlightening. He previously worked for a marine agriculture company and understood the span of the damage shrimp growers contend with. Hearing the lecture, it dawned on him that Schroeders direction could offer a solution to a very widespread problem.

The disease Ufaz was thinking about is white spot syndrome, a virus that affects a wide variety of crustaceans and is viral among shrimp, especially in east Asia, where most commercial farming an industry with an annual turnover of over $30 billion is located. An infected shrimp farming pond has a mortality rate of around 80%, with deaths occurring within hours of infection. To date, most attempts to control the virus and prevent it from spreading to other parts of the world focused on bettering sanitation and thinning out the animals, but these measures are only partly effective. The syndrome causes damages of around $6 billion a year, according to ViAquas data.

A week after the Protalix lecture, the scientists met. Ufaz and another eventual ViAqua co-founder, marine biologist Shai Einbinder, told Schroeder about the problem. There was a bit of squirming and skirting around the issue before they dared say the product they wanted to develop was for shrimp, Schroeder recalled. In 2014, they banded together to form the company.

In a little cabin at the edge of the Technions campus, a few dozen small aquariums have a great view of Haifa bay. Inside those containers, thousands of ViAquas test shrimps await their midday meal. There is one special ingredient inside the little food pellets they receive a food additive that should provide immunity to the virus. We created a substance that is made of a shrimps usual food sources, so it is defined as a food additive and not a drug, Ufaz explained. We want to reach the shrimp when theyre still young and inoculate them against the disease before they have a chance to catch it.

The Technion cabin only hosts ViAquas base trial, for the pellet formula. As Israel forbids bringing the white spot syndrome virus into the country, even for research purposes, the companys clinical trial is held in three locations in Europe, Asia, and the US. Company data shows inoculated shrimp experience a drop of over 50% in mortality rates.

ViAquas vaccine is based on RNAi. In 1998, American researchers Andrew Fire and Craig Mello discovered that RNA molecules can under certain circumstances, inhibit gene expression or translation. They won the 2006 Nobel Prize in medicine for their discovery, called RNA interference, or RNAi.

In 2012, when I arrived at MIT for my post-doc, the discovery of the RNAi mechanism was still completely new, and many people attempted to harness it for cancer-related applications, like the prevention of metastatic cancer, Schroeder said. When cancer cells leave the original tumor and invade the lungs, for example, they require a certain protein to attach themselves to lung tissue. It has been proven that if the production of that protein is delayed, there is less metastation, Schroeder said. We can synthesize a molecule called siRNA, which knows to replace the bodys original RNA. We can create this molecule with a certain sequence that will stop cells from becoming infected and metastating, and such a molecule with a different sequence will make the cell more vulnerable to drugs.

The process is the same in both humans and shrimp, Schroeder explained. For the virus to pass from one cell to another in shrimps, it needs certain proteins, the production of which we now know how to stop. In shrimps, though, there is only one protein responsible for the virus that needs targeting, while in cancer cells, there are multiple ones.

ViAquas product is currently in the process of receiving regulatory approval in 11 countries, and if all goes well, it will hit the market within the next 12 months. The company, which forecasts revenues of 5 million euros for the first year, has recently signed an exclusivity agreement with Nutreco, one of the industrys leading companies for animal nutrition and aquafeed. Nutreco NV also became a partner in ViAqua. Other company partners include the Technion, Israeli venture firm and accelerator Trendlines Group, and Singapore-based venture capital fund VisVires.

Before shrimps, however, there was cancer. Schroeders first run-in with the disease was during his BSc days, when he studied chemical engineering at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. At the time, he was a low-level employee at Teva Pharmaceutical Industries who dreamt of a career as a pharmaceutical engineer. He was sent to assist at the lab of Hebrew University biochemist Yechezkel Barenholz, a medical nanotechnology pioneer and one of the developers of breast cancer treatment Doxil, the first liposomal drug and nano-medicine approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Barenholz was working to develop liposome-based technology for the safe conduction of chemotherapy drugs in hopes of finding a way to bypass chemotherapys debilitating side effects. While the project failed to reach commercialization, it changed Schroeders life.

I had no intention of continuing in academia, I wanted to develop drugs, but when I understood the things research can accomplish I realized my place was in academic research and not the industry, he said.

Schroeders first study with liposomes involved childhood cancer patients. No one likes getting jabbed with a needle, but children receiving chemotherapy experience that all the time, making their situation even harder, he said. Parents receive a topical numbing agent to spread on the childs skin before leaving for the hospital, but traffic jams and patient backlog sometimes mean the numbing effect has passed by the time the staff gets to the child. To surpass that problem, Schroeder and his team worked to develop an ultrasound wave-based system that will lead the numbing agent directly to the needed location quickly. While they did manage to develop the system, they had no takers.

The project did not fail so much as it was ahead of its time, Schroeder explained, adding that his paper on the research was cited over a thousand times. It takes time for the scientific world to catch up to the technological and business world. When we approached the drug companies at the time and proved that the product works, they said thats nice, but we dont deal with ultrasound, and ultrasound companies said thats nice, but we dont sell drugs. Today, many of the new drugs integrate a technological system.

The next phase of Schroeders career was, again, accidental. In 2006, as a doctoral student at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the lab was approached by Hadassah University Hospital Ein Kerem regarding a child with a locked jaw. The hospital wanted to see if liposomes could be used to treat her. We took empty liposomes, played with their molecular structure, and managed to turn them into lube, like grease in a machines bearings. That development resulted in Moebius Medical, a joint venture between the Hebrew University, the Technion, and Hadassah, which leveraged the formulation to treat rheumatoid arthritis. In 2016, Moebius sold the licensing rights for the product to Mumbai-headquartered Sun Pharmaceutical Industries.

In 2015, another little girl led to another of Schroeders ventures. He was approached by Rambam Hospital in Haifa regarding a baby with a rare brain tumor that the doctors were uncertain how to treat. We collaborated with them to create a testing system reminiscent of an allergy test, he explained. When you test allergens, you inject a very small dose of allergen material and wait to see whether the skin reacts. Following the same principle, we took liposomes and filled each one with a minuscule dose of different chemotherapy drugs, 0.001 of the treatment dose, which we then injected the child with. That amount cannot cause harm, but was enough to understand which drug created the required reaction.

That innovative approach led to the babys complete recovery, and to the establishment of Barcode Diagnostics, which develops the method for wider application. At least a third of cancer patients receive an unsuitable drug, and it is very hard to predict how a drug will react once injected, Schroeder said. Our technology enables better treatment compatibility for every patient. Currently, were developing a tool that enables doctors to receive a clear indication of whether a drug works or not within 48 hours at most. After a few years of animal trials, well start a clinical trial with breast cancer patients in 2020.

Some may choose to rest on their laurels, but not Schroeder. He founded another company in 2015, PEEL Therapeutics, a collaboration between the Technion and the University of Utah to test the anti-cancer properties of a protein taken from elephants. For those who missed the pun, peel means elephant in Hebrew.

Elephants do not get cancer, Schroeder explained. When you look at their cells and compare them to ours, you see one difference related to a gene called P53, which is known to inhibit the development of cancer cells. As we age, that mechanism ages as well, which is why cancer becomes more common the older you get. Humans have to make do with two copies of this gene, one from each parent, but elephants have 40 copies, and with such a high number cancer simply cannot develop. The way the gene is built also makes the mechanism more durable. What we aim to do is take P53 from elephants and, using a liposome-based delivery system, lead that elephant gene directly into the tumor we want to kill.

PEEL now creates that protein artificially in a lab, but the first copy was taken from a blood sample of an elephant in a US zoo. The company is currently in a pre-clinical stage, having achieved proof of principle in 15 cancer types, including aggressive cancers such as brain and pancreas, Schroeder said, adding that the company expects to achieve a marketable drug within a few years.

Schroeders typical workday is 18 hours, and he tries to work some of it from home for the family. He has five children. A huge amount of his time, though, is spent on planes. This is to be expected for a man involved in the management of four cross-continent companies. In recent weeks, he made two short visits to the US and another unplanned one to India. His passport issued less than two years ago is already covered with multiple stamps.

He is still focused on cancer, Schroeder said, he just understands now that curing shrimp is faster than curing cancer. But he is optimistic. I feel, and this is supported by research data, that in the upcoming decade, we will solve most problems with cancer treatment, he said. By 2030, we will reach a place where most cancer patients will be cured. All developments are converging into personalized treatments, with a maximal delivery capability, that will enable a drastic reduction of chemotherapys side effects.

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Dangers of putting a suitcase on the bed – Gulf News

§ January 11th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Dangers of putting a suitcase on the bed – Gulf News

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It is unlikely that you come home from a trip and stand on top of your bed still wearing your street shoes. Why would you? Your shoes are covered in God-knows-what, and your bed is a sacred space.

For some travellers, putting their suitcase on their bed is just as offensive. The wheels of our luggage tread the same soiled path as our shoes, rolling through airport bathrooms, sidewalks and public transportation. To these travellers, the thought of plopping said suitcase atop the same place for sleeping is an affront to humanity.

While it might sound gross to put a worldly bag on your bed, is it actually harmful to your health? According to Phyllis Kozarsky, an expert travel health consultant for the Centres for Disease Control (CDC) and Preventions travellers health branch and the chief medical editor of the CDC reference guide Health Information for the International Traveler, most public health professionals dont consider luggage a major transmitter of disease.

We have not identified outbreaks related to dirty luggage, Kozarsky says.

- Natalie B. Compton, travel writer

Where travellers may benefit from cleaning their luggage is if theres a suspicion that their hotel room has a bedbug infestation.

Then they certainly would benefit by vacuuming out their luggage or cleaning it after they returned home, Kozarsky says. But otherwise, she says, the bag is not typically a source of transmission of illness.

Even if your luggage touching your bed wont hurt you, you might still be plain old revolted. After all, travel is a germ-addled experience.

You have people ... carrying all types of different germs. Some of them are sick, and you now have them populating these public travel places, says Colleen Costello, CEO of Vital Vio, a company that makes antibacterial LED lights.

Your fellow travellers have to touch all the same things you have to touch, from the TSA checkpoint to the aeroplane, the train ticketing machine to the handrail in your train car.

Touch points in travel

They have microscopic germs on them. And, realistically, (janitorial staff) may be getting to clean them rather infrequently, Costello says of the many touch points involved in travel. Everything you bring into these public spaces can basically pick up or drop off different germs, and you cant see them. Theres no way to really know when you or your personal belongings are exposed.

For your peace of mind, Costello recommends giving your bag a quick disinfection or storing it on a luggage rack. Technically speaking, you could go beyond disinfecting your luggage wheels and sanitise the rest of your travel experience the aeroplane tray table, entertainment screen, armrests, hotel room door and remote control. But Kozarsky, the CDC travel medicine expert, doesnt vouch for that lifestyle.

Its hard to keep up with every doorknob, every railing. Think of what you do between your home and your destination, Kozarsky says. You can become a little neurotic that way.

We live in a germ-filled world. Coming into contact with bacteria is part of life, and trying to sanitise every travel accessory or surface we touch can turn into a Sisyphean task.

Instead, make sure youre washing your hands with soap and water after using the restroom and before you eat. Carry hand sanitiser for the times you dont have access to soap and water. Avoid touching your eyes and mouth as much as possible. And remember: Dodging illness isnt a perfect science. Getting a cold from time to time is human.

Natalie B. Compton is a writer specialising in travel reporting.

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Innovative technology saving women’s lives in Cameroon – Anadolu Agency

§ January 11th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Innovative technology saving women’s lives in Cameroon – Anadolu Agency

BAMENDA, Cameroon

Technology invented by young doctor Conrad Tankou has made cervical and breast cancer screening easier in rural areas of Bamenda in northwestern Cameroon.

It will undergo more innovations in 2020 as its promoter recently unveiled to Anadolu Agency.

According to figures from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, breast cancer has the highest occurrence among women in Cameroon with an age-specific ratio of 2,625 new cases per 100,000 women per year.

Cervical cancer is second with an age-specific ratio of 1,993 new cases per 100,000 women per year.

Furthermore, 95% of cancer patients in Cameroon are diagnosed at an advanced or terminal stage of the disease, while treatment options are scarce and the prognosis not very optimistic. But screening techniques for some cancers are centralized and difficult to access for people in remote areas.

Called Gicmed, Conrad's technology project was developed to solve these problems.

It spans three phases. The first began in 2017. It is based on the use of a unique and atypical device.

In particular, a telemedicine and pathology reading platform. It enables a trained doctor to collect data from patients after screening. The data is then sent to a specialist based anywhere for confirmation of a diagnosis without having to travel long distances.

According to the promoter, its impact is positive. He reported that more than 4,000 women have benefited since its launch.

"We have brought a new solution adapted to the remote areas where we are established. We noticed that for many women, screening was something new. Many of them over the age of 50 were not aware of the screening. Others regretted having to go only to the big cities to get such medical assistance," he said.

A wonderful idea

Some doctors speaking to Anadolu Agency praised the technology.

"This is a very good idea. It's a real success in my hospital. Many women come for testing and they are surprised to know that they don't have to go to Yaounde or any far town for that. Before, they were discouraged to know that they had to go to the big cities for this kind of treatment," said Dr. Nformi Emmanuel, director of a hospital where Conrad's solution was implemented.

For Dr. Ayuvea Angelo, the idea is also "wonderful".

"Such a creation is a very good solution for people who don't have to go far to get tested. Since it was launched, women have been coming to get tested very often. It's easier," he added.

Conrad's goals remain the same. It is to improve remote diagnosis for people in remote areas and to raise awareness of the importance of screening for certain chronic diseases.

They are important because, he said, "in Africa, these diseases are poorly managed. So they gradually take hold in patients' bodies, yet the sooner they are detected, the sooner they are treated. Especially in troubled regions, where only cases such as maternity, HIV or tuberculosis are of the greatest concern."

He considers his project a Godsend. He told Anadolu Agency that 2020 will be devoted to improving it.

It will be the same technology but more developed in diagnosing other diseases easily.

"It is practically a question of upgrading the software and hardware to cover other pathologies which require microscopic diagnosis. Thus, to collect enough data to build applications that will use artificial intelligence in the third phase of the project. Because it will improve the medical services rendered," he said.

Research of solutions in medicine in Africa needs a step-by-step approach and takes prerequisites which are difficult or slowly acquired, he said.

"It is necessary to collect a maximum of data on pathologies and archiving systems to better integrate developed technologies. And we don't have enough of them on the continent. Dematerialization is still lagging behind in our medical centers. That's why we're moving forward in a progressive way," said Conrad.

But he is confident about the goods his innovation will bring.

He received several international awards for his social commitment.

In Cameroon, he is considered the doctor who serves the underprivileged. He said he is passionate about "the search for new technologies adapted to his environment and likely to solve health problems and save lives".

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God Willing, He Will Cure Cancer, and Shrimp – CTech

§ January 11th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on God Willing, He Will Cure Cancer, and Shrimp – CTech

Avi Schroeders lab at the Technion Israel Institute of Technology is tiny but mighty. Thirty researchers crowd it daily, covering areas such as biology, chemistry, medicine, pharmaceuticals, and even mechanical engineering. The lab is part of the chemical engineering faculty, but the researchers here were handpicked from different departments to serve the labs interdisciplinary mission. The content of the multitude of test tubes here could one day result in life-saving medication for a variety of conditions. Until then, the lab has already birthed several innovations that matured into business ventures: Schroeder and his team are involved in four such companies based on the labs scientific breakthroughs, ranging from using elephant protein to cure cancer to personalizing chemotherapy.

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BIRAC Supported Biotechnology Park And Incubation Centre In Rajasthan Soon – IndianWeb2.com

§ January 11th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on BIRAC Supported Biotechnology Park And Incubation Centre In Rajasthan Soon – IndianWeb2.com

A biotechnology park and incubation centre will be set up in Rajasthan for which a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) will be signed between the Centre and the state government, Union Secretary, Department of Biotechnology, Renu Swaroop said on Friday.

The park and incubation centre will provide an opportunity to conduct research in the field of biotechnology and employment to the youth, she said.

Swaroop was addressing the State Biotech Cohort Meeting, which was attended by vice chancellors, directors and deans of all universities having biotechnology courses, representatives from institutes conducting research in biotechnology and start-ups associated with it.

Swaroop said the Centre will provide full support and assistance to promote biotechnology in Rajasthan.

The biotechnology park and incubation centre will be set up with the support of Biotechnology Industry Research Assistance Council (BIRAC).

She said utility of biotechnology is increasing in every field, including health, agriculture and agriculture production, industry, edible food, among others. There is a need to promote biotechnology, and encouraging it will give pace to industrial development and research, she added.

Rajasthan Department of Science and Technology Secretary Mugdha Sinha said bio-informatics, biomedical engineering and nano medicine will be encouraged in the state.

The Rajasthan government recently launched Nirogi Rajasthan (Healthy Rajasthan) campaign and all possible assistance through bio-informatics will be provided to strengthen it, she added.

Biotechnology ecosystem and start-ups will be improved in the state with the help from Centre, she said. PTI AG

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Growing Demand for Eco-friendly Products to Bolster the Growth of the Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) Market during 2015 2021 – Primo…

§ January 10th, 2020 § Filed under Nano Medicine Comments Off on Growing Demand for Eco-friendly Products to Bolster the Growth of the Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) Market during 2015 2021 – Primo…

The comprehensive report published by Persistence Market Research offers an in-depth intelligence related to the various factors that are likely to impact the demand, revenue generation, and sales of the Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) Market. In addition, the report singles out the different parameters that are expected to influence the overall dynamics of the Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) Market during the forecast period 2015 2021.

As per the findings of the presented study, the Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) Market is poised to surpass the value of ~US$ XX by the end of 2029 growing at a CAGR of ~XX% over the assessment period. The report includes a thorough analysis of the upstream raw materials, supply-demand ratio of the Healthcare Nanotechnology (Nanomedicine) in different regions, import-export trends and more to provide readers a fair understanding of the global market scenario.

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Key players in the global nanomedicine market include: Abbott Laboratories, CombiMatrix Corporation, GE Healthcare, Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Johnson & Johnson, Mallinckrodt plc, Merck & Company, Inc., Nanosphere, Inc., Pfizer, Inc., Celgene Corporation, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., and UCB (Union chimique belge) S.A.

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